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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 5 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 22: prisoners.-benevolent operations during the War.--readjustment of National affairs.--conclusion. (search)
erms, while contemplating the majestic plant. On the day April 15, 1861. when the President called for seventy-five thousand men to suppress the Slave-holders' insurrection, women of Bridgeport, Connecticut, organized a society for the purpose of affording relief and comfort to the volunteers. This was the first in all the land. In Charlestown, Massachusetts, on the same day, a woman took steps for the formation of a society, for the same purpose; On the afternoon of that day, Miss Almena Bates, of Charlestown, Massachusetts, read the President's call for men, and the idea at once occurred to her that some of the men must go from Charlestown, and that they would need aid and comfort from home. She suggested the formation of a society for the purpose of affording such aid, and it was done.--The Tribute Book, by Frank B. Goodrich, page 112. and a few days later, the women of Lowell did the same. Goodrich says that the first subscription-list to which the Rebellion gave birt
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sanitary commission, the United States (search)
sailors during the American Civil War, the other body being the United States Christian commission (q. v.). The corporate names of the two organizations indicate their respective spheres of operation. On the day that President Lincoln issued his call for 75,000 men, the women of Bridgeport, Conn., organized a society for the purpose of affording relief and comfort to the volunteers. This was the first in all the land. On the same day (April 15, 1861) a woman in Charlestown, Mass. (Miss Almena Bates), took steps to form a similar organization, and a few days later the women of Lowell did the same. They proposed to supply nurses for the sick and wounded, and provisions, clothing, and other comforts not furnished by the government; also to send books and newspapers to the camps, and to keep up a constant communication with their friends in the field. On the 19th the women of Cleveland, O., formed an association for the purpose of taking care of the families of the volunteers. E
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Siboney, (search)
ingent were on shore. The Spanish troops made but little resistance. On the 23d General Lawton's division reached Siboney, and on the following day pushed forward so that General Kent's division might immediately occupy the place. In these early movements the Americans were greatly assisted by a body of Cubans. General Shafter planned that General Lawton's division should take a strong defensive position on the road from Siboney to Santiago; Kent's division was to be held near Santiago; Bates's brigade was to support Lawton; and Wheeler's cavalry division was to be in the rear on the road from Daiquiri to Siboney. On the 23d-24th, however, General Young's brigade, of Wheeler's division, passed Lawton, and was therefore in the advance early the next morning. This brigade consisted of part of the 10th United States Cavalry and two battalions of the 1st Volunteer Cavalry (Rough Riders). On the road to Santiago, and about 3 miles from Siboney, was the strong natural position called
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Spain, War with (search)
estructive artillery fire or an overwhelming force of troops, or by flank manoeuvres. Our troops, under the skilful and conspicuous leadership of the subordinate commanders directly in charge of them on the fighting-line, displayed in a marked degree dauntless intrepidity, fortitude, and gallantry. Lawton exhibited most excellent generalship and the same tenacity and activity which he had displayed on other fields. Chaffee was conspicuous for his courage, for which he was already noted. Bates, one of the veterans of the Civil War, moved his division to the support of Lawton, and again returned in time to take part in the closing scenes about San Juan Hill. Wheeler, who had taken part in the affair at Las Guasimas and had become ill from overexertion, which compelled his absence during the principal fighting at San Juan Hill, yet, on hearing of the engagement, with more martial spirit than physical strength, joined his command later in the day. During his temporary absence, the c