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John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 22 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 6 0 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 6 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
epartment. Secretary of the Navy: Gideon Welles (Conn.) Treasury Department. Secretary of the Treasury: Salmon P. Chase (Ohio) Secretary of the Treasury: W. P. Fessenden (Maine), appointed July 1, 1864 Secretary of the Treasury: Hugh McCulloch (Ind.), appointed March 7, 1865. Interior Department. Secretary of the Interior: Caleb B. Smith (Ind.) Secretary of the Interior: John P. Usher (Ind.), appointed January 8, 1863. Department of justice. Attorney-General: Edward Bates (Mo.) Attorney-General: James Speed (Ky.), appointed Dec. 2, 1864. Post-office. Postmaster-General: Montgomery Blair (Md.) Postmaster-General: William Dennison (Ohio), appointed September 24, 1864. The United States War Department. Secretary of War: Joseph Holt (appointed Jan. 18, 1861); Simon Cameron (appointed March 5, 1861) Secretary of War: Edwin M. Stanton (appointed January 15, 1862). Assistant secretaries of War: Assistant Secretary of War: Thomas A. Scot
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Recollections of Foote and the gun-boats. (search)
re finished and accepted. January 15th, 1862, and put in commission the next day. The delay was in part due to lack of funds and in part to the necessity of alteration in the design of the vessels. Had they been completed in the time specified, the Mississippi campaign, from Island Number10 to Vicksburg, would probably have been over before Farragut passed the forts at New Orleans. Editors. Soon after the surrender of Fort Sumter, while in St. Louis, I received a letter from Attorney-General Bates, dated Washington, April 17th, in which he said: Be not surprised if you are called here suddenly by telegram. If called, come instantly. In a certain contingency it will be necessary to have the aid of the most thorough knowledge of our Western rivers and the use of steam on them, and in that event I have advised that you should be consulted. The call by telegraph followed close upon the letter. I hurried to Washington, where I was introduced to the Secretary of the Navy, the H
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Appendix D: the struggle for pay. (search)
il their share of a contract where the Government has openly repudiated the other share. If a year's discussion, however, has at length secured the arrears of pay for the Northern colored regiments, possibly two years may secure it for the Southern. T. W. Higginson, Colonel 1st S. C. Vols. (now 33d U. S. August 12, 1864. Justice not done yet. To the Editor of the New York Tribune: Sir,--An impression seems to prevail in the newspapers that the lately published opinion of Attorney-General Bates (dated in July last) at length secures justice to the colored soldiers in respect to arrears of pay. This impression is a mistake. That opinion does indeed show that there never was any excuse for refusing them justice; but it does not, of itself, secure justice to them. It logically covers the whole ground, and was doubtless intended to do so; but technically it can only apply to those soldiers who were free at the commencement of the war. For it was only about these that th
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Index. (search)
Index. Adams, C. F., Hon., 25. Aiken, William, Gov., 170. Allston, Adam, Corp., 93. Andrew, J. A., Gov, 3, 71, 224, 225, 289. Bates, Edward, Hon., 290. Beach, H. A., Lt., 271, 272. Bearregard, W. T., Gen., 22, 57. Beecher, II. W., Rev., 256. Bell, Louis, Col., 236. Bennett, W. T., Gen., 265, 269. Bezzard, James, 83. Bigelow, L. F., Lt., 2. Billings, L., Lt.-Col., 269. Bingham, J. M., Lt., 176, 270. Brannan, J. M., Gen., 98. Brisbane, W. H., 40. Bronson, William, Sergt., 273. Brown, A. B., Lt., 272. Brown, John, 4, 22, 41, 60. Brown, John (colored), 274. Brown, York, 275. Bryant, J. E., Capt., 230, 231. Budd, Lt., 68. Burnside, A. E., Gen., 33,34. Butler, B. F., Gen., 1. Calhoun, J. C., Capt., 151, Chamberlin, G. B., Lt., 185, 270. Chamberlin, Mrs., 242. Cheever, G. B., Rev., 293. Child, A., Lt. 271, 272. Clark, Capt., 70, 76, 92. Clifton, Capt., 90, 91. Clinton, J. B., Lt., 170. Corwin, B. R., Maj., 115, 122. Crandall, W. B., Surg., 269. C
r election he again writes: I advise you privately that Mr. Douglas would be the strongest candidate that the Democratic party could present for President; but they will not present him. The old leaders wouldn't endorse it. As he is doomed to be slaughtered at Charleston it is good policy to fatten him meantime. He will cut up the better at killing time. An inquiry for his preference as to Presidential timber elicited this response, December 4th. As to President, my present judgment is Edward Bates, with John M. Read for Vice; but I am willing to go anything that looks strong. I don't wish to load the team heavier than it will pull through. As to Douglas, he is like the man's boy who (he said) didn't weigh so much as he expected, and he always knew he wouldn't. I never thought him very sound coin; but I didn't think it best to beat him on the back of his anti-Lecompton fight, and I am still of that opinion. The letters of Lincoln at this period are the best evidence of his fe
ted in which to hold its sessions, and it was estimated that ten thousand persons were assembled in it to witness the proceedings. William H. Seward of New York was recognized as the leading candidate, but Chase of Ohio, Cameron of Pennsylvania, Bates of Missouri, and several prominent Republicans from other States were known to have active and zealous followers. The name of Abraham Lincoln had also often been mentioned during his growing fame, and, fully a year before, an ardent Republican esubsided, and the chairman announced that balloting would begin. Many spectators had provided themselves with tally-lists, and when the first roll-call was completed were able at once to perceive the drift of popular preference. Cameron, Chase, Bates, McLean, Dayton, and Collamer were indorsed by the substantial votes of their own States; but two names stood out in marked superiority: Seward, who had received one hundred and seventy-three and one half votes, and Lincoln, one hundred and two.
s. Of these he would take at least three, perhaps four, to compose one half of his cabinet. In selecting Seward, Chase, Bates, and Cameron, he could also satisfy two other points of the representative principle, the claims of locality, and the elem Pennsylvania, Chase from Ohio, and himself from Illinois, the four leading free States had each a representative. With Bates from Missouri, the South could not complain of being wholly excluded from the cabinet. New England was properly represenby your leave, this place in the administration. Seward asked a few days for reflection, and then cordially accepted. Bates was tendered the Attorney-Generalship on December 15, while making a personal visit to Springfield. Word had been meanwhonsumed, another cabinet complication found its solution. It had been warmly urged by conservatives that, in addition to Bates, another cabinet member should be taken from one of the Southern States. The difficulty of doing this had been clearly f
e relieved by supplies or reinforcements; and this information was accompanied by the written opinions of the officers that to relieve the fort would require a well-appointed army of twenty thousand men. The new President had appointed as his cabinet William H. Seward, Secretary of State; Salmon P. Chase, Secretary of the Treasury; Simon Cameron, Secretary of War; Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy; Caleb B. Smith, Secretary of the Interior: Montgomery Blair, Postmaster-General; and Edward Bates, Attorney-General. The President and his official advisers at once called into counsel the highest military and naval officers of the Union to consider the new and pressing emergency revealed by the unexpected news from Sumter. The professional experts were divided in opinion. Relief by a force of twenty thousand men was clearly out of the question. No such Union army existed, nor could one be created within the limit of time. The officers of the navy thought that men and supplies mi
memorandum of protest, to be signed by the members of the cabinet, which drew a gloomy picture of present and apprehended dangers, and recommended the immediate removal of Mc-Clellan from command. Chase and Stanton signed the paper, as also did Bates, whom they immediately consulted, and somewhat later Smith added his signature. But when they presented it to Welles, he firmly refused, stating that though he concurred with them in judgment, it would be discourteous and unfriendly to the Presd therefore probably unwilling to give their assent. The refusal of Mr. Welles to sign had evidently caused a more serious discussion among them about the form and language of the protest; for on Monday, September I, it was entirely rewritten by Bates, cut down to less than half its original length as drafted by Stanton, and once more signed by the same four members of the cabinet. Presented for the second time to Mr. Welles, he reiterated his objection, and again refused his signature. T
Chapter 34. Blair Chase chief justice Speed Succeeds Bates McCulloch Succeeds Fessenden resignation of Mr. Usher Lincoln's offer of $400,000,000 the second inaugural Lincoln's literary rank his last speech The principal concession in the Baltimore platform made by the friends of the administration to their opponents, the radicals, was the resolution which called for harmony in the cabinet. The President at first took no notice, either publicly or privately, of this rct the mischievous tendencies of the President toward conciliation and hasty reconstruction. The reorganization of the cabinet went on by gradual disintegration rather than by any brusque or even voluntary action on the part of Mr. Lincoln. Mr. Bates, the attorney-general, growing weary of the labors of his official position, resigned toward the end of November. Mr. Lincoln, on whom the claim of localities always had great weight, unable to decide upon another Missourian fitted for the plac
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