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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 78 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 12 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 9 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 7 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 4 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bates, Joshua, 1788-1864 (search)
Bates, Joshua, 1788-1864 Financier; born in Weymouth, Mass., in 1788; went to England as the agent of William Gray & Son, Boston, and was thrown into intimate relations with the Hopes, Barings, and other great commercial firms. In 1826 he entered into partnership with John Baring, and afterwards became the senior partner of the firm of Baring Brothers & Co. In 1854 he was appointed umpire between the British and American commissioners in the adjustment of claims between citizens of Great rship with John Baring, and afterwards became the senior partner of the firm of Baring Brothers & Co. In 1854 he was appointed umpire between the British and American commissioners in the adjustment of claims between citizens of Great Britain and the United States growing out of the War of 1812. In 1852 Mr. Bates offered $50,000 to the city of Boston for the establishment of a free public library, and afterwards gave the library some 30,000 volumes. He died in London, England, Sept. 24, 1864.
, I feel, he says, a degree of happiness in being in a position similar to that of the judge who congratulated himself that it was his privilege not to have any opinion on a complicated question of fact, on which it was the duty of the jury to make up their minds. The Governor said, however, that he should not run counter to Mr. Chase's system in regard to our national currency, but should decidedly favor it; that he had seen, a few days before, a letter, written to a friend in Boston by Joshua Bates, of London, concerning the conduct of our finances during the war, which he deemed to have been on the whole to our credit, although he criticised the issue of legal-tender notes, thinking we should have first resorted to borrowing on long loans; yet it was his opinion that it would have been absolutely impossible for us ultimately to avoid resorting to them. We have already spoken of a sum of money collected in San Francisco, Cal., by citizens of that place, and forwarded to Governor
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 22: England again, and the voyage home.—March 17 to May 3, 1840. —Age 29. (search)
Earl was succeeded on his death by his eldest son,—Sumner's friend, Lord Morpeth. Sumner met Lady Carlisle at Castle Howard, in Oct. 1857. and the next day with Bates. Joshua Bates, American banker, 1788-1864. Mr. Bates invited Sumner to attend, Feb. 12, 1839, his daughter's marriage to Sylvain Van de Weyer, the Belgian stateJoshua Bates, American banker, 1788-1864. Mr. Bates invited Sumner to attend, Feb. 12, 1839, his daughter's marriage to Sylvain Van de Weyer, the Belgian statesman. Morpeth wishes me to see the Lansdownes and Hollands, but I decline. Yesterday, I fell upon the last North American. North American, Jan., 1840, Vol. L. Felton's article on Longfellow's Hyperion, pp. 145-161. Cleveland's article on Hillard's edition of Spenser's Poetical Works, pp. 174-206. It was precious to me, for Mr. Bates invited Sumner to attend, Feb. 12, 1839, his daughter's marriage to Sylvain Van de Weyer, the Belgian statesman. Morpeth wishes me to see the Lansdownes and Hollands, but I decline. Yesterday, I fell upon the last North American. North American, Jan., 1840, Vol. L. Felton's article on Longfellow's Hyperion, pp. 145-161. Cleveland's article on Hillard's edition of Spenser's Poetical Works, pp. 174-206. It was precious to me, for it reflected four dear friends. There I saw in the lucid page yourself and Cleveland, Longfellow and Felton. Beautifully written and turned was Cleveland's article; well-poised and careful, Felton's criticism. I jumped as I read them. I am proud of all of you, and rejoice that you are my friends. I have seen something of the t
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
e negotiations of the Treaty of Washington, again pressed this view. Letter of Aug. 1, 1842. Works, Vol. VI. p. 303. See Wheaton's International Law (Dana's edition), pp. 165-167. The British Government refused to restore the slaves; but Mr. Joshua Bates, as umpire under the Convention of Feb. 8, 1853, held that the owners had a just claim against it for pecuniary indemnity. The reasons which he gave for his decision are open to the same criticism as are the arguments of Mr. Webster's letteite you to breakfast. I often dined with Senior, or met him at dinner. He has remarkable powers, but is cold and logical. Who would have thought that he was the most interesting reviewer of Walter Scott's novels? Perhaps you have letters to Mr. Bates, You will find him a person of sterling honesty and sense. His son-in-law, Mr. Van de Weyer, the Belgian Minister, has a great deal of talent.. . . Julia is still young enough to be happy. She has a bright, cheerful nature, from which I ex
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 48: Seward.—emancipation.—peace with France.—letters of marque and reprisal.—foreign mediation.—action on certain military appointments.—personal relations with foreigners at Washington.—letters to Bright, Cobden, and the Duchess of Argyll.—English opinion on the Civil War.—Earl Russell and Gladstone.—foreign relations.—1862-1863. (search)
His cordial understanding with Welles appears in the latter's book on Lincoln and Seward. From Bates he obtained a decisive opinion as to the pay of colored troops. Sumner's only reference to the rt intervals, he was fortified by letters from John Bright and the American banker in London, Joshua Bates. In a letter to R. Schleiden. March 16, Sumner wrote: I took to the President last evening this step, requested him to see the members individually. The senator found Welles, Blair, and Bates receptive to his views; but Chase remained firmly against him. He had an unpleasant interview wierty. This is his mystery. Both were needed. There is no doubt here about Hooker. He told Judge Bates, at the time of the visit with the President, that he did not mean to drive the enemy, but tonition of the South by England on the basis of negro slavery had become an impossibility. Joshua Bates, in his letter to Sumner, May 13, testified to this change of public opinion. Adams recogniz
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 49: letters to Europe.—test oath in the senate.—final repeal of the fugitive-slave act.—abolition of the coastwise slave-trade.—Freedmen's Bureau.—equal rights of the colored people as witnesses and passengers.—equal pay of colored troops.—first struggle for suffrage of the colored people.—thirteenth amendment of the constitution.— French spoliation claims.—taxation of national banks.— differences with Fessenden.—Civil service Reform.—Lincoln's re-election.—parting with friends.—1863-1864. (search)
to rectify his action, but without avail; and Stanton became very impatient under their persistency. The question was then carried into Congress, on a joint resolution reported by Wilson. The Senate was favorable to equality of pay; but Fessenden and some other senators were indisposed to a retrospective provision. Feb. 10, 29, and June 11, 1864. Works, vol. VIII. pp. 84-102. Finally the controversy, after lasting for some months, was settled by a reference to the attorney-general, Mr. Bates, who decided in favor of the claim of the colored troops to equality of pay. Many letters on the subject passed between Governor Andrew and Sumner, and the former thanked the senator for his constant advocacy of a just measure. Neither Stanton nor Whiting intended injustice to the colored troops; but the different statutes raised a doubt which they gave in favor of the government, while fuller discussion led the attorney-general to an opposite conclusion. At this session began the cont
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1852. (search)
ou, that my name has been mentioned in connection with the Thirty-fourth [a new regiment then forming]. I am obliged to my friends that may have suggested it; but I really do not wish to leave the Fifteenth. There is already evidence of too much desire on the part of officers to get leave of absence for the sake of procuring higher appointments in new regiments. He was soon after rewarded for his constancy by being promoted to the surgeonship of his own regiment, on the resignation of Dr. Bates. His personal adventures at Antietam cannot be made more interesting than in his own words, under date of September 24, 1862:— As our brigade advanced in line of battle, under fire from the Rebel batteries, General Gorman (why I know not) ordered me to the left of the line, thus bringing me with the Thirty-fourth New York Regiment. This regiment became first engaged with the enemy, and partly from the deadly fire, and partly from the breaking of the regiment on its left (of anot
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1861. (search)
land several centuries. . . . . The branch of the family from which I am descended has lived for the most part in the town of Braintree. I have lived in Boston all my life; and previous to entering college I had attended only the public schools of that city. I began my education at a primary school, kept in the basement of the Warren Street Chapel, from which I passed successively through the higher grades of public schools. In 1846 I entered the Brimmer Grammar School, taught by Mr. Joshua Bates; in 1852, the English High School, taught by Mr. Thomas Sherwin; and in 1855, the public Latin School, taught by Mr. Francis Gardner. After spending two years in this last institution, I entered Harvard College in September, 1857. At the Brimmer, the English High, and the Latin Schools I received Franklin medals. I also received a Lawrence prize each year of my attendance at the High School, for proficiency either in scientific or the literary department; and in the second year of m
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, Biographical Index. (search)
, A. W., Capt., I. 245. Bartlett, W. F., Gen., I. 119; II. 91, 92;, 99. Batchelder, Capt., II. 154. Batchelder, G. W., Capt., Memoir, II. 1-11. Batchelder, Jacob, II. 1. Batchelder, Mary W., II. 1. Batcheler, Samuel, II. 427. Bates, J., II. 207. Bates, J. N., Dr., I. 185. Bean, Richard, II. 451. Beauregard, G. T., Maj.-Gen. (Rebel service), II. 271. Bell, John, I. 418. Bell, Joseph, Maj., I. 195. Bigelow, G. T, Judge, I. 85. Bigelow, H. G., Lieut., I. 4Bates, J. N., Dr., I. 185. Bean, Richard, II. 451. Beauregard, G. T., Maj.-Gen. (Rebel service), II. 271. Bell, John, I. 418. Bell, Joseph, Maj., I. 195. Bigelow, G. T, Judge, I. 85. Bigelow, H. G., Lieut., I. 444. Bigelow, H. J., Dr., I. 134. Bigelow, John, Capt., II., 235, 236. Billings, Dr., II. 407, 408;. Birney, D., Lieut., II. 424. Birney, D. B., Maj.-Gen., II. 98, 419;, 420, 424. Birney, Fitzhugh, Capt., Memoir, II. 415-424. Birney, J. G., II. 415, 424;. Birney, William, Brig.-Gen., II. 420, 424;. Blake, C. F., II. 105. Blenker, Louis, Maj.-Gen., I. 111. Blight, Atherton, I. 311. Bliss, Capt., I. 146. Boardman, Mr., I. 336. Bodisco, M. de. I. 356.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 8: (search)
), to pass a couple of days there; and then went to Sir Francis Doyle's, whom I found much changed, by severe and long-continued disease, but still with the same distingue, gentlemanlike air he had when I knew him three years ago. I dined with Bates, the banker. Van De Weyer, Soon afterwards Mr. Bates's son-in-law. the Belgian Minister, was there,—an acute and pleasant person, talking English almost perfectly well,—and Murray, formerly secretary to Lord Lyndhurst, and now the Secretary oMr. Bates's son-in-law. the Belgian Minister, was there,—an acute and pleasant person, talking English almost perfectly well,—and Murray, formerly secretary to Lord Lyndhurst, and now the Secretary of the great Ecclesiastical Commission, —a very good scholar and a very thorough Tory, who talks with some brilliancy and effect. In the evening I had an engagement to go to Lord Holland's, who is now passing a few days at his luxurious establishment in South Street. I found there Lord Albemarle, Pozzo di Borgo, Lord Melbourne, the Sardinian Minister, Young Ellice and his beautiful. highbred wife, Allen, and some others. Pozzo di Borgo was brilliant, and Lady Holland disagreeable. Lord
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