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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 26, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. F. Bates or search for J. F. Bates in all documents.

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ike ? No law, then, has been passed applying the Wilmot Proviso. Has any been enacted abolishing slavery in the District of Columbia? No. Even Mr. Lincoln assures us that he will approve no such law, except with the consent of the slaveholders of the District, and then not without compensation to the owners. Has any law been passed interfering with slavery in the States? Not at all. Such a doctrine is not even in the Chicago platform. Mr. Lincoln, Mr. Seward, Mr. Caleb B. Smith, Attorney-General Bates, Senator Wilson, and all the chief men of the Republican party repudiate it — none maintain it but professed and extreme Abolitionists, such as Gerritt Smith, Henry Ward Beecher, Wm. Lloyd Garrison, Arthur Tappan, Charles Sumner, and Wendell Phillips, whose fanatical and wicked efforts, backed by all the aid they can enlist from the rank and file of pure Abolitionism, can never any more disturb or harm the institution of slavery in the States than the zephyr's breath can unseat the e
sisted as follows. The exact strength of the different corps I am not at liberty to give, for obvious military precaution: Five companies First and Second Regiment Regulars, Major Sturgis. Five companies First Regiment Missouri Volunteers, Lieutenant-Col. Andrews. Two companies Second Regiment Missouri Volunteers, Major Osterhous. Three companies Third Regiment Missouri Volunteers, Colonel Siegel. Fifth Regiment Missouri Volunteers, Colonel Salamon. First Regiment Iowa Volunteers, Colonel J. F. Bates. First Regiment Kansas Volunteers, Colonel Deitzler. Second Regiment Kansas Volunteers, Colonel Mitchell. Two companies First Regular Cavalry, Captains Stanley and Carr. Three companies First Regular Cavalry (recruits), Lieut. Lathrop. Captain I. Totten's Battery Regular Artillery, six guns, six and twelve-pounders. Lieut. Dubois's Battery Regular Artillery, four guns, six and twelve-pounders. Captain Shaeffer's Battery Missouri Volunteer Artillery, six guns, six and twelve-pounders
bmit the following report of the part taken by the Iowa troops in the late hotly contested battle of Wilson's Creek. At 6 o'clock P. M., of the 9th inst., the First regiment of Iowa Volunteers, under command of Lieut.-Col. Wm. H. Merritt, Col. J. F. Bates being sick, united with the forces at Springfield, under command of Gen. Lyon, and commenced the march to Wilson's Creek, twelve miles distant. Arriving within three miles of the enemy's camp and in close proximity to their pickets, the ordetice. Among the latter, however, were Capts. Cavender and Miller, members of the ex-Legislature, Capt. Granger of the regulars, Major Porter of Iowa, Major Cloud of Kansas, Capt. Wood of the Kansas cavalry, and Capt. Wright of the Home Guards. Col. Bates, of the Iowa First, who had been confined for several days with a fever and diarrhea, mounted his horse and attempted to go to the field of battle on the evening preceding it, but was compelled to return to town, much to his regret, after march
themselves, that not less than two-thirds of them would have to bivouac under trees and by camp-fires for the night. Where so many daring acts and valorous deeds were performed, it were almost impossible to single any one as worthy of especial notice. Among the latter, however, were Capts. Cavender and Miller, members of the ex-Legislature, Capt. Granger of the regulars, Major Porter of Iowa, Major Cloud of Kansas, Capt. Wood of the Kansas cavalry, and Capt. Wright of the Home Guards. Col. Bates, of the Iowa First, who had been confined for several days with a fever and diarrhea, mounted his horse and attempted to go to the field of battle on the evening preceding it, but was compelled to return to town, much to his regret, after marching two or three miles with the column. On the march out many of those who now lie in their graves were joyously singing and feeling as gay as larks. Among the songs I heard were the Iowas' favorite, which relates the doings of Jackson and Price