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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Battle or search for Battle in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
told him not to do such a thing again; that this was no ordinary war, and the brave and gallant Federal officers were the very kind that must be killed. The incident, it would appear, was reported to Dr. McGuire with something of misinformation. The point he makes as to General Jackson however is unaffected. A most estimable citizen of Richmond, Va., Colonel Edwin L. Hobson (late colonel of the 5th Alabama Infantry, and who, at the surrender at Appomattox Courthouse, was in command of Battle's Brigade), has given a different version to the editor. Its correctness is manifest, and will, it cannot be doubted, be gladly accepted by Dr. McGuire: The occurrence was at the battle of South Mountain, September 14, 1862. Colonel, then Major, Hobson was in command of the 5th Alabama, Rodes' Brigade. Colonel John B. Gordon had been placed by General D. H. Hill, the division commander, to prevent a flank movement by the enemy. The enemy was steadily advancing on the line of Rodes,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
ory of the 23d Regiment, which constantly shared its fortunes through it all—thence again to the lines at Petersburg, and down to the end. The next fighting done by the brigade was as a part of Early's command in that truly great march on Washington city. The brigade was in all the battles of that command, and made the flank movement with Gordon's Division at Bell Grove and Cedar Creek. In this battle it had a hand-to-hand conflict with the 6th Army Corps. It captured, with the aid of Battle's Brigade, of Alabama, six pieces of artillery, which were gallantly defended by the artillerymen, who died at their posts rather than surrender. The brigade was ordered to take position in front of Middleburg, where it remained during the day, having skirmished with cavalry in front. That evening General Sheridan, having taken command of the Federal troops, made his attack on the left flank of the Confederate line. The brigade was in position where it could see the line as it broke, firs