Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for T. L. Bayne or search for T. L. Bayne in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ne here who know as I do of his action and gallantry, his devotion and bravery, signalized upon every field, who will fail to extend to him a hearty reception. The distinguished president of the Veterans' Association, Colonel Eshleman, and Colonel Bayne, the indefatigable and honored president of the Washington Artillery Association, will also give voice in answer to the toasts proposed to be drunk in honor of their respective charges. Now, Mr. Chairman, I desire to express my thanks for ttalion owes much. His superior qualities as a commanding officer, and as a diplomat, have done much both in war and in peace to keep the battalion intact, and to preserve our esprit de corps. And with such men as Eschleman, Richardson, Hero, Bayne, Dupuy, Kursheedt, McElroy, O'Brien, Fuqua, De Russey, Holmes, Palfrey, Leverich, and our whole host of veterans, the command will not lack backers and advisors for the future. And in the words of Coleridge, when These good knights are dust,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the history of the Washington Artillery. (search)
you like a true soldier, with fire and fancy, a soldier's story of the marches and battles, the trials and triumphs of a command whose name and fame is recognized in all parts of our common country. That he will do justice to his theme, there are none here who know as I do of his action and gallantry, his devotion and bravery, signalized upon every field, who will fail to extend to him a hearty reception. The distinguished president of the Veterans' Association, Colonel Eshleman, and Colonel Bayne, the indefatigable and honored president of the Washington Artillery Association, will also give voice in answer to the toasts proposed to be drunk in honor of their respective charges. Now, Mr. Chairman, I desire to express my thanks for the attention that has been bestowed upon my unworthy effort and to apologize for the time I have consumed in my weak endeavor to place before you a partial record of the Washington Artillery from its organization to the date of its departure for Vir
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
illery. You see around you men who have been in the fore-front of battle; you see the father of the command, Colonel Walton, who has devoted a life to the service and welfare of the Washington Artillery. To whose tact, coolness and decision, the battalion owes much. His superior qualities as a commanding officer, and as a diplomat, have done much both in war and in peace to keep the battalion intact, and to preserve our esprit de corps. And with such men as Eschleman, Richardson, Hero, Bayne, Dupuy, Kursheedt, McElroy, O'Brien, Fuqua, De Russey, Holmes, Palfrey, Leverich, and our whole host of veterans, the command will not lack backers and advisors for the future. And in the words of Coleridge, when These good knights are dust, And their good swords are rust; Their souls with God, we trust, they will leave you a precious legacy, of which you should be proud. Preserve it carefully without blemish, for it is purified by the blood of brave men; and should your country need y
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Our fallen comrades. (search)
Our fallen comrades. Speech of Colonel T. L. Bayne, of the Washington Artillery. [At the Reunion of the Washington Artillery in New Orleans, May 27th, 1882, Colonel T. L. Bayne made the following response to a toast to Our Fallen Comrades, which we cheerfully give a place with the other speeches on the occasion which have sketched the history of that famous old command:] Every heart in this company throbs with a response to this toast more eloquent than words: Our Fallen Comrades. Colonel T. L. Bayne made the following response to a toast to Our Fallen Comrades, which we cheerfully give a place with the other speeches on the occasion which have sketched the history of that famous old command:] Every heart in this company throbs with a response to this toast more eloquent than words: Our Fallen Comrades. I see in the faces of the veterans around me evidence of the emotion called forth by this reference to their brave companions, with whom they have marched, and bivouacked and fought. They recall the faces and forms of their comrades, whose names appear upon this roll of honor. They remember with what enthusiasm they joined them as members of this now historic command—with what patriotism and courage they followed its flag over more than forty battle-fields of the war, and finally gave up the