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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 7 1 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book. You can also browse the collection for Beaconsfield or search for Beaconsfield in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XII (search)
range world from which they came, he yet could not utter a word of their language, till at last he thought of a mode of greeting. Stretching forth his hands reverently, he cried, Mohammed! Joy flashed over their dark faces, and assuming a reverent posture, they answered, Bonaparte!It matters not whether either of these heroes was a false prophet, he stood for a personal ideal, such as no mere king or nobleman can represent; and such an influence may exist equally under any government. Beaconsfield and Gladstone, Cleveland and Blaine, represent hosts of sincere and unselfish admirers, and, on the other hand, of bitter opponents. If the enthusiasm be greater in England, so is the hostility; no American statesman, not even Jefferson or Jackson, ever was the object of such utter and relentless execration as was commonly poured on Gladstone in England a year or two ago in what is called the best society, where Sir Edwin Arnold's ideals are supposed to be most prevalent. No class dis
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XIX (search)
not very different from theirs should also have his practical side. It must be remembered that the supposed prejudice against educated men in practical affairs is not confined to our own country, but exists in England, in France, in Germany; and in each case with the additional condition which I have pointed out, that it is found more among other educated men than in the general public mind. We think of England as a place where they put authors forward in public life; and we instance Beaconsfield, Gladstone, Morley, and Bryce, by way of illustration. But the acute Sir Frederick Elliot wrote to the poet Sir Henry Taylor, in 1876: I think that literati, when they have not been exercised in practical affairs (note that exception!) are the worst of politicians. He has especially in mind historians, and makes the point, which is worth noticing, that they are a little apt to confound the dead and the living. Look at Freeman; he digs into forgotten records and finds that the ancestor
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, Index (search)
Sarah, 144. B. Background, the need of a, 113. Bacon, Lord, 114, 175. Bailey, P. J., 57. Bain, Alexander, 202. Balzac, H. de, 114. Bancroft, George, 107, 155. Bancroft, H. H., 172. Barker, Lemuel, 184. Bartlett, J. R., 216. Beaconsfield, Lord, 110, 167, 179, 180. Beecher, H. W., 60. Besant, Walter, 74. Bigelow, 54. Billings, Josh, 59. Black, William, 202. Blaine, J. G., 110. Blake, William, 218. Bonaparte, Napoleon, 28, 52, 109, 188, 234. Book catalogue, a Westminstercle, answer of, to Cicero, 4. Demosthenes, 69. Descartes, Rene, 71. Dickens, Charles, 12, 93, 183, 184, 206. Dickinson, Emily, 16. Digby, K. H., 116. Donnelly, Ignatius, 175. Dime novel, the test of the, 198. Disraeli, Benj., see Beaconsfield. Drake, Nathan, 187. Dryden, John, 195. Dukes, acceptance of, 12. Doyle, J. A., 33. E. Eckermann, J. P., 97, 188, 228. Edwards, Jonathan, 155. Eggleston, Edward, 11. Equation of fame, the, 88. Eliot, Charles, 174. Eliot, G