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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 41 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 4 0 Browse Search
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rnor Moore, of Louisiana, and Major-General Lovell, at New Orleans; Lieutenant A. N. T. Beauregard, to Governor Pettus, of Mississippi; and Major B. B. Waddell, who wDorn, the location of whose headquarters had not yet been ascertained. General Beauregard also wrote to General Cooper, at Richmond, asking for any instructions th that it interfered with the War Department's own recruiting operations. General Beauregard answered that the call was to be made by each governor, in the name of hisboroa, reorganizing his troops, on his way towards Stevenson, acceded to General Beauregard's request, and, some days later, upon completing his reorganization, chan, and Huntsville. General Bragg referred the question of compliance with General Beauregard's request to the War Department, which, as he informed General BeauregardGeneral Beauregard, left it to his own discretion. He decided to go at once, and furnish about ten thousand men, including three regiments that he had already sent to Chattanooga, to
nger of isolation for General Johnston. General Beauregard's letter to him. the great battle of thar Corinth. General Johnston accedes to General Beauregard's request, and begins a movement to join him. General Beauregard assumes command. arrival of General Bragg's forces at Corinth. Corinth tcentration, as originally decided upon. General Beauregard appeals to the War Department for the Geremembered that one of the conditions of General Beauregard's departure for the Mississippi Valley wief of Staff. On the 20th of that month General Beauregard called for Captains Wampler and Fremeaux of February. The next day he requested General Beauregard to join him there, but this the latter wwest bank of the latter stream, and kept General Beauregard well informed of the movements of the enns for an offensive movement had reached General Beauregard from the Federal rendezvous at Cairo, Paely isolating General Johnston's forces, General Beauregard, who now had the assurance of being soon[3 more...]
Cannot telegraphic line be established between Humboldt or Union City, and Island No 10? G. T. Beauregard. New Orleans, Feb. 24th, 1862. To General G. T. Beauregard: Mississippi three regiments in six days; balance (seven) shortly. A. N. T. Beauregard. Jackson, Tenn., Feb. 24th, 1862. To A. N. T. Beauregard, New Orleans: All right; will prepare for them. G. T. Beauregard. New Orleans, Feb. 28th, 1862. To General G. T. Beauregard: Are you authorized to take any troops under AA. N. T. Beauregard, New Orleans: All right; will prepare for them. G. T. Beauregard. New Orleans, Feb. 28th, 1862. To General G. T. Beauregard: Are you authorized to take any troops under Act 21st August? Are you authorized, under that Act, to specify the length of time for which you will take them? If you are, please state shortest time. I am doing everything I can. Answer quickly. It is useless to expect war men. T. O. Moore. Jackson, Tenn., Feb. 28th, 1862. To Governor T. O. Moore, New Orleans: Will accept all good, equipped troops under Act 21st August, that will offer for ninety days. Let people of Louisiana understand here is the proper place to defend Louisiana.
vor to have the prisoners removed in the course of the day or to-night. Should, meanwhile, the enemy bombard Sumter, and you have not enough cover for your command, you will expose the prisoners, instead of your troops, to the enemy's fire. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, A. N. T. Beauregard, A. D. C. The events succeeding those we have just related—but which are, relatively, of minor importance—are sufficiently explained by the following letters and instructions of General Beauregard to his subordinate officers, to the War Department, and to generals and citizens of note in South Carolina and elsewhere: Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 10th, 1863. Brig.-General R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,—I am instructed to inform you of the arrival from Richmond of a party of one hundred and thirty officers and men, under the command of Lieutenant Rochelle, C. S. N. These men were ordered here for ha<
assis for six 10-inch columbiads. Respectfully, your obdt. servt., Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., July 15th, 1863. Lieut.-Col. D. B. Harris, Chf.-Eng., Dept. S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C.: Colonel,—The General Commanding directs me to instruct you to have Shell Point Battery constructed for three guns, instead of two, as at first contemplated, provided it can be accomplished. Also to ask that a copy of General Beauregard's letter of yesterday morning be furnished him for his files. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, A. N. T. Beauregard, A. D. C. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., July 15th, 1863. Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, Commanding First Mil. Dist., Charleston, S. C.: General,—The Commanding General suggests that several hundred rice and other casks shall be furnished the troops on Morris Island, for the construction of rat-holes. It will be well also,