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headquarters Army of the Mississippi, Corinth, Miss., May 15, 1862. Capt. A. N. Toutant Beauregard, Aide-de-Camp, &c.: Captain: Please say to the general that I ams Army of the West, In Camp, near Corinth, Miss., May 15, 1862--12 p. m. [General Beauregard:] General: Your message in regard to my picket just received. I have direction. Reply, if any, not found. Yours, very respectfully, A. N. Toutant Beauregard. Charleston, S. C., March 31, 1863. Col. Jacob Thompson, Jackson, M1st. Do you recollect about what time Generals Bragg and Polk arrived at General Beauregard's headquarters? Was it not then so dark that the general did not at firsor the desperate struggle then going on? These facts being historical, General Beauregard hopes you will find no objection to answer them as well as your recollecty not have seen them, and he desires them returned after being read. Reply, if any, not found. Respectfully, your obedient servant, A. N. Toutant Beauregard.
hin about 20 miles of Tuscumbia. Having discovered and repaired the burnt bridge already alluded to, if it be possible to capture Tuscumbia and Florence I shall then be able to open communications with the main body of the army under your command. We have no news of any fighting since the battle of the 8th. O. M. Mitchel. headquarters Third Division, Huntsville, April [14], 1862. General D. C. Buell, Care General Dumont: We captured to-day the inclosed dispatch in cipher from General Beauregard. The-cipher has proved as little effectual in holding back the Third Division of your army as the destruction of bridges. We have deciphered the cipher and we read as follows: Corinth, April 9. General S. Cooper, Richmond, Va.: All present probabilities are that whenever the enemy moves on this position he will do so with an overwhelming force of not less than 85,000 men. We can now muster only about 35,000 effectives. Van Dorn may possibly join us in a few days with about
advisability of abandoning the work. In attempting to reach the fort the General desires that a proper regard should be had to your own safety. You must not undertake the trip, if too dangerous. Respectfully, your obedient servant, A. N. Toutant Beauregard, A. D. C. Colonels Gilmer and Harris complied with these instructions, and, the next day, presented the following report to Department Headquarters: In compliance with the above letter, a council of officers, consisting of of the day or to-night. Should, meanwhile, the enemy bombard Sumter, and you have not enough cover for your command, you will expose the prisoners, instead of your troops, to the enemy's fire. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, A. N. T. Beauregard, A. D. C. The events succeeding those we have just related—but which are, relatively, of minor importance—are sufficiently explained by the following letters and instructions of General Beauregard to his subordinate officers, to the W
eneral Commanding directs me to instruct you (as already verbally informed) to alter the two mortar batteries at Fort Johnson into gun batteries for one heavy rifled gun or 10-inch gun in each. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, A. N. T. Beauregard, A. D. C. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., July 15th, 1863. Lieut.-Col. D. B. Harris, Chf.-Eng., Dept. S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C.: Colonel,—In addition to the works ordered in my communicree guns, instead of two, as at first contemplated, provided it can be accomplished. Also to ask that a copy of General Beauregard's letter of yesterday morning be furnished him for his files. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, A. N. T. Beauregard, A. D. C. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., July 15th, 1863. Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, Commanding First Mil. Dist., Charleston, S. C.: General,—The Commanding General suggests that several hundred rice