Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard or search for Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard in all documents.

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re he led. upon the struggle, then in its very inception. In that fiery baptism, a man still unknown to fame was to receive, at the hands of a gallant soldier about to surrender his soul to the Maker who gave it, the name which, to the world, was to supplant that conferred by his natural sponsors, and by which he will ever be known as among the great captains of his race and of history. The supreme effort of the Federal commander was directed against the left of the army of Johnston and Beauregard and upon the open plateau surrounding the Henry house. The battle was raging furiously, and seemingly the Southern line at that Point was on the verge of utter disaster, when the Carolinian, General Barnard E. Bee, rode from his shattered and wavering brigade over to where Jackson still held fast with his mountain men. General, he said in tones of anguish, they are beating us back. no, sir, was the grim reply; we will give them the bayonet. Bee rode back and spoke to his brigade: l
essee, Confederate generals full rank Beauregard and Johnston All the officers who held thong those killed in battle. Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard Beauregard received the SurreBeauregard received the Surrender of the First Federal Citadel—Fort Sumter; fought in Defense of the Last Confederate Citadel-thebout fifty-five thousand. General Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard (U. S.M. A. 1838) was borwith it. After the latter's death at Shiloh, Beauregard remained at the head of the army until after volunteer Confederate forces under Brigadier-General Beauregard into the First Corps, Army of the PStephen Dill Lee fought in five States; with Beauregard at Charleston, April, 1861, and with Hood atith General Johnston in command and General P. G. T. Beauregard second. Lieutenant-General Simonississippi on March 5, 1862, and to General P. G. T. Beauregard was given the command. The army wain South Carolina. James Chestnut, aide to Beauregard at Fort Sumter. Johnson Hagood, defender [3 more...]<
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), General officers of the Confederate Army: a full roster compiled from the official records (search)
ommands, and fully justified, were never legally confirmed. In such cases, as those of Joseph Wheeler and John B. Gordon, General Wright has followed the strictest interpretation of the Confederate records below. As for the body of this History it has been thought best to employ the titles most commonly used, and found in the popular reference works. The highest rank attained is given in every case together with the date of the commission conferring such rank. Generals, regular Beauregard, P. G. T., July 21, 1861. Bragg, Braxton, April 6, 1862. Cooper, Samuel, May 16, 1861. Johnston, A. S., May 30, 1861. Johnston, J. E., July 4, 1861. Lee, Robert E., June 14, 1861. General, provisional army Smith, E. Kirby, Feb. 19, 1864. Generals, provisional army (with temporary rank) Hood, John B., July 18, 1864. Lieutenant-generals, provisional army Buckner, S. B., Sept. 20, 1864. Ewell, Richard S., May 23, 1863. Forrest, N. B., Feb. 28, 1865. Hampton, Wade, Feb. 14, 1