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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 3,199 167 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2,953 73 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 564 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 550 26 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 448 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 436 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 390 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 325 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 291 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 239 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for G. T. Beauregard or search for G. T. Beauregard in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The true story of the capture of Jefferson Davis. (search)
t Lee to have to surrender. His preparations for defence at Danville would have been wholly inconsistent with such an expectation. Breckinridge was not sent to confer with Johnston, nor did he find him only in time to assist in drawing up the terms of his celebrated capitulation to Sherman. On the contrary, he arrived at Greensboroa on the 12th or 13th of May, in time to take part in a conference already in progress between President Davis and some of his Cabinet, Generals Johnston and Beauregard. Several days afterward he again met General Johnston, in response to a telegraphic request from the latter, in full time to take part in the negotiations with General Sherman, which resulted, on the 18th, not in the final capitulation, but in the armistice which the Government of the United States declined to ratify. General Breckinridge was not present and took no part in the celebrated capitulation. [See Johnson's Narrative, pages 396-407.] There was no such change of plan , fatuou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Torpedo service in the Harbor and water defences of Charleston. (search)
Torpedo service in the Harbor and water defences of Charleston. by General G. T. Beauregard. [The following article from the distinguished engineer and accomplished soldier who made the heroic defence of Charleston, has been delayed much longer than we had intended by circumstances over which we had no control.] Letter from General Beauregard. Rev. J. W. Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Virginia: Dear sir: During last summer several articles appeared nthly in the Southern Historical Society Papers, so ably conducted by you. I remain, dear sir, yours very truly, G. T. Beauregard. Narrative by General Beauregard. On my return to Charleston in September, 1862, to assume command of the DeGeneral Beauregard. On my return to Charleston in September, 1862, to assume command of the Department of South Carolina and Georgia, I found the defences of those two States in a bad and incomplete condition, including defective location and arrangement of works, even at Charleston and Savannah. Several points-such as the mouths of the Ston
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Flanner's North Carolina battery at the battle of the Crater. (search)
d of Mahone, arrived, and were placed in position preparatory to making the final charge, which resulted in the recapture of the works about 2 o'clock in the day. The fire of the enemy, from nearly one hundred guns, was concentrated upon my company for two hours; but amid this terrible rain of deadly missiles these brave North Carolinians stood to their guns and repulsed every advance made by the enemy, holding them in check alone, and without infantry support, until the arrival of General Beauregard with the troops commanded by Mahone before mentioned. We claim the honor of saving the day, and preventing what might have been a very serious disaster and probable loss of Petersburg. No onre save those who went through the fiery ordeal can form the slightest conception of the fury of this attack. Not less than fifty shell a minute were hurled at the company; and but for the protection fforded them by the sides of the road, they would have been swept off the face of the earth.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
egram, the boy artillerist, whose record lives in the hearts of the whole army, and whose last words were: I have done my duty, and now I turn to my Savior ; John H. Pegram, whose brave young life was sacrificed at the post of duty he always coveted; General Ed. Johnson, who so loved to go in with the boys, musket in hand; General Henry A. Wise, the fearless tribune of the people, who claimed no exemption from hardship and danger on account of his age or long service; Colonel D. B. Harris, Beauregard's great engineer officer, whose merit was only equalled by his modesty ; Commodore Maury, whose brave devotion to the right was not eclipsed by his world-wide fame as a scientist, and many other men of mark whom we may not now even mention. The following beautiful letter from ex-President Davis was read at the recent laying of the corner-stone of the Confederate monument at Macon, Ga., and so appropriately gives voice to the sentiments of the people of the South generally that we print