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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 3,199 167 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2,953 73 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 564 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 550 26 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 448 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 436 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 390 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 325 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 291 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 239 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War. You can also browse the collection for G. T. Beauregard or search for G. T. Beauregard in all documents.

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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 1 (search)
, with General Lee and the Confederate authorities. General Beauregard assigned to command of Confederate army at Manassas.s on Manassas. Precautions preparatory to assisting General Beauregard. The composition of the convention assembled in R. (See fourth and fifth paragraphs of that report.) General Beauregard came to Manassas Junction and assumed command on tha . Should you move so far as to make a junction with General Beauregard, the enemy would be free immediately to occupy the Vfrom Leesburg to seize the Manassas Gap road and to turn Beauregard's position.... In that event, if your scouts give you acuntain-passes to make a flank attack in conjunction with Beauregard's column, and with God's blessing to achieve a victory afrom General Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General: General Beauregard is attacked; to strike the enemy a decisive blow, a your discretion. A half-hour later, a telegram from General Beauregard informed me of his urgent need of the aid I had prom
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 2 (search)
three-fifths of the army. We reached General Beauregard's position about noon. The Seventh and under the command of naval officers. General Beauregard pointed out, on his map, five roads convhose preceding them, were distributed by General Beauregard's staff-officers, because they were addret out at a rapid gallop, accompanied by General Beauregard, to give such aid as we could to our trode afterward fought. After assigning General Beauregard to the command of the troops immediatelh the help of my own staff and a part of General Beauregard's. The largest of these bodies, about eqciated the manoeuvre, executed it well. General Beauregard promptly seized the opportunity thus aff do likewise; their immediate commander, General Beauregard, was requested to give them orders, howe See previous Narrative, and Johnston's and Beauregard's reports. The only collision in the transpoent. to its price. Efforts were made by General Beauregard and myself, by correspondence with the G[18 more...]
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter3 (search)
E. Lee, from June 14th; fourth, J. E. Johnston, from July 4th; and, fifth, G. T. Beauregard, from July 21st, the date of the appointment previously conferred upon himnston (colonel U. S. A.); fourth, R. E. Lee (lieutenant-colonel U. S. A.); G. T. Beauregard (captain U. S. A.). The change in the legal arrangement was made by my rem several hours on the matter in question, the evening of the next day, in General Beauregard's quarters, with that officer, Major-General G. W. Smith, and myself. uch a campaign might be commenced. He replied, Fifty thousand soldiers. General Beauregard answered, Sixty thousand; and I the same number. Each of the three expla brigades and divisions. The organization then existing had been made by General Beauregard and myself, necessarily without reference to States. The four or five reanded by Major-General Jackson; the District of the Potomac, commanded by General Beauregard, and extending from the Blue Ridge to the Quantico; and that of the Acqui
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 4 (search)
l not hold me to that responsibility while the corresponding control is not in my hands. Let me assure your excellency that I am prompted in this matter by no love of privileges of position, or of official rights, as such, but by a firm belief that, under the circumstances, what I propose is necessary to the safety of our troops and cause. The suggestion made in this letter was not accepted. Early in the month the army lost Major-General Van Dorn, and in the latter part of it General Beauregard, who held the first place in the estimation of much the larger number of the troops; both were sent by the Government to the valley of the Mississippi. What was known in the army as the bounty and furlough law went into effect on the first day of the year. It was intended to encourage engagement in the service by those who had volunteered for but one year. Either from defects in the law itself, or faults in the manner in which it was administered, it had the effect of weakening t
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 6 (search)
iving to those in the field, as far as practicable, the encouragement and benefit of your personal direction. Arrange to take for temporary service with you, or to be followed without delay, three thousand good troops who will be substituted in General Bragg's army by a large number of prisoners returned from the Arkansas Post capture, and reorganized, now on their way to General Pemberton. Stop them at the point most convenient to General Bragg. You will find reenforcements from General Beauregard to General Pemberton, and more may be expected. Acknowledge receipt. I replied at once: Your dispatch of this morning received. I shall go immediately, although unfit for field-service. I had been prevented, by the orders of the Administration, from giving my personal attention to military affairs in Mississippi The reader's attention is called to this fact, because I have been accused of neglecting Mississippi, to give my time to Tennessee. at any time since the 22d of January.
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
t Hudson to Raymond, and W. H. T. Walker's, just arrived at Jackson, from General Beauregard's department, to join him there. On the 12th, McPherson with his corps e Hudson. I had learned, on the way, that reenforcements were coming from General Beauregard's department, and that the foremost of them, under Brigadier-General Gistailroad transportation. On the 20th and 21st, Gist's brigade, sent by General Beauregard, and Ector's and McNair's, from General Bragg's army, joined me. Loring'sn's, nine thousand seven hundred; of Bragg's, eight thousand four hundred; of Beauregard's, six thousand; not including irregular cavalry, nor Jackson's command Aboune; from General Bragg, seven thousand nine hundred and thirty-nine; from General Beauregard, six thousand two hundred and eighty-three. Brigadier-General Jackson's cake on your part is, that all your numbers are too large; in reference to General Beauregard, nearly as ten to six. The troops you mention, including Jackson's, just
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
derate Government had been unable to prevent a siege, it was certain that it could not break one. As the capture of the place could not be prevented, the army should have been saved by leading it away. If I and the reinforcements sent from Beauregard's department had been ordered to Mississippi in April, in time to join General Pemberton's army, I could have directed the Confederate forces, and would have been responsible for events; but, by hesitating to transfer troops and send a new commn of Bragg's cavalry to aid Pemberton in April, transferring a large brigade of cavalry into Mississippi on the 5th of May, and applying for reinforcements for Pemberton on the 7th, suggesting that the withdrawal of Foster's troops might enable Beauregard to furnish them, prove the contrary. In paragraph XXI.,your Excellency refers to the constant desire shown in my correspondence, beginning early in January, that you should change the order placing Tennessee and Mississippi in one command u
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 10 (search)
untry would be more than doubled, I think, by the promotion and assignment I recommend. Should the movement in question be made, Lieutenant-General Longstreet's command would necessarily take part in it. Other troops might be drawn from General Beauregard's and Lieutenant-General Polk's departments. The infantry of the latter is so small a force that what would remain after the formation of proper garrisons for Mobile would be useless in Mississippi, but a valuable addition to the Army of Tved, will be available, if nothing shall occur to divert them, viz.: Infantry.Artillery.Cavalry.Total. Your own command33,0003,0005,00041,000 General Martin's cavalry, now en route to you3,0003,000 From Lieut.-Gen. Polk5,0005,000 From Gen. Beauregard10,00010,000 From Gen. Longstreet's command12,0002,0002,00016,000 60,0005,00010,00075,000 It is proposed to hold the reenforcements ready, and to put them in motion just as soon as you may be able to use them. To throw them to the fro
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 11 (search)
ection for a commander, or to place more implicit reliance on one, than that army did for you. I believe the last man of them would have willingly died at your bidding. You know how I felt when you showed me the order relieving you-when, after the fall of Atlanta, President Davis visited us at Palmetto Station, he asked me whom the army preferred as its commander. My reply was, in substance, they prefer General Johnston; next to him, of those available for the command, they prefer General Beauregard. He then inquired as to the grounds of their preference for General Johnston. Another officer present advanced the opinion that it was because they believed General Johnston would take care of them and not expose them to danger. I interrupted, and asserted emphatically that such ideas did great injustice to the army; that the true reason of their confidence in General Johnston was, they trusted his skill and judgment, and believed that, whenever he issued an order for battle, they w
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 12 (search)
Tennessee in North Carolina. interview with General Beauregard. movement of the Federal forces in North Carng the command thus assigned to me, I visited General Beauregard in Charlotte, where his headquarters then wereneral Sherman's army invaded South Carolina, General Beauregard ordered those remaining on duty to repair to to, and at Columbia; and had been directed by General Beauregard to march thence to Charlotte. The second, leunt to six or eight thousand men. Leaving General Beauregard to protect the line of railroad from Charlottan was moving from Columbia toward Charlotte, General Beauregard instructed Lieutenant-General Hardee to direc o'clock in the morning, on the 12th, and was General Beauregard's guest. His quarters were a burden-car nearrt of the surrender of the army in Virginia. General Beauregard and myself, conversing together after the inttleman fulfilled his engagement promptly; and General Beauregard and myself were summoned to the President's o
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