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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 3,199 167 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2,953 73 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 564 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 550 26 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 448 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 436 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 390 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 325 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 291 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 239 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for G. T. Beauregard or search for G. T. Beauregard in all documents.

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force in the Mechanicsville road. We are ready for him there, and at all other points. Our army is large, full of valor, officered by the best talent, and the siege of Richmond — for such it will continue to be — will witness many desperate sorties. We hope much from the counter-irritation commenced by Jackson. A number of iron-clad gunboats are now not far from Drewry's Bluff, ready to participate in the assault, whenever made. We hear of Burnside's landing below Petersburgh, and of Beauregard's retreating thirty-five miles from Corinth, but the news lacks confirmation. The city is one vast hospital. Woman's ministering hands are not wanting to alleviate the sufferings of our wounded. Hermes. Memphis appeal account. Richmond, Tuesday, June 8, 1862. The ostensible reason for abandoning the line of the Chickahominy, in the retreat from Yorktown, was, that in the event of a general action, Gen. Joe Johnston did not desire a river of such magnitude in his rear, and,
Doc. 34.-Beauregard's orders. headquarters army of the Mississippi, Corinth, Miss., May 10, 1862. The following communication from the Commander of the forces is published for the information and guidance of this army. Let it respond to this emphatic command of Forward, and always forward, and the Northern horde now approaching us will fly as chaff before the wind. headquarters Western Department, Corinth, Miss., May 10. Immediately after any engagement with the enemy, you wilidly advance in the direction of the heaviest firing; for the art of war consists in concentration of masses. Moreover, our motto should be, Forward, and always forward! until victory may perch decisively upon our banners. The more rapid the attack the weaker, habitually, the resistance. Respectfully, General, your ob't serv't, G. T. Beauregard, Gen. Com'g. To Major-General Braxton Bragg, Com'g Army of the Miss. By command of General Bragg. George C. Garner, Assistant Adjutant General.
ny officers or soldiers of the United States, she shall be regarded and held liable to be treated as a woman about town plying her avocation. By command of Major-Gen. Butler. Geo. C. Strong, A. A.G. This order fell into the hands of Gen. Beauregard, who issued the following: For the information of the army, general order No. Twenty-eight of the Federal officer, Major-Gen. Butler commanding at New-Orleans, will be read on dress-parade. Men of the South, shall our mothers, wives, d No. Twenty-eight of the Federal officer, Major-Gen. Butler commanding at New-Orleans, will be read on dress-parade. Men of the South, shall our mothers, wives, daughters and sisters be thus outraged by the ruffianly soldiers of the North, to whom is given the right to treat at their pleasure the ladies of the South as common harlots? Arouse, friends, and drive back from our soil these infamous invaders of our homes and disturbers of our family ties. G. T. Beauregard, General Commanding.
aken for secesh. We hardly would have known them ourselves, as they had gathered hats and coats of confederate stock, and looked the rebel all over. I consider this feat of the cavalry as a feather in the cap of every man in the army that rides a horse; for heretofore I have never seen any very remarkably brave and daring movements from this arm of the service. Col. Elliott did not know Corinth was evacuated until he was a long way on his journey back. A large force was sent out by Beauregard to intercept and cut him off; but General Pope looked ahead, and ordered him to return by a widely different route. So winding our forces through woods and deep ravines, or daringly dashing through villages and over hedges of astonished planters, by the black harems of mass and massa's sons, the people generally, and the astonished negroes particularly, looked on, and saw and wondered, and rubbed their eyes, and as the horsemen vanished, believed it almost a dream. Now, to the readers
ng through extensive camps just vacated, soon reached Corinth and found half of it in flames. Beauregard and Bragg had left the afternoon before, and the rearguard had passed out of the town before d. Nothing surprised me more than the character of the rebel works. From the length of time Beauregard's army had been occupying the place, with a view to its defence, and from the importance the rhension. Here is a place commanding several important railroads; a place the seizure of which Beauregard confessed in his celebrated despatch to Davis, would open to us the Valley of the Mississippi;ll had their headquarters in houses — generally occupying the finest residences in the place. Beauregard's was on the east of the Purdy road, and at the outskirts of the place. The rebel chieftain wtwenty-seventh, an intelligent deserter came into camp, and on being questioned stated that Gen. Beauregard had been at Holly Springs, Miss., for several days, recruiting his health, as he alleged, b
go. At first, only a few companies of confederate soldiers were kept here ; but at the time of the surrender of Island No.10, the garrison was increased to five thousand, which has been drained down to about two hundred and fifty by the army of Beauregard at Corinth. The length of the bluff is about four miles, three of which are skirted by the river, Cole Creek running inland along its base. It is at the debouch of this creek that the fortifications commence. Commencing at Cole Creek, we fpears from the statements of some of the natives, that after the surrender of Island No.10 the garrison of Fort Pillow was about twenty thousand men. All of them but about one thousand five hundred were withdrawn some six weeks ago to reenforce Beauregard at Corinth. A week ago the garrison was further weakened by the withdrawal of the Twelfth Louisiana, the only full regiment in the Fort, and during the last two or three days not more than seventy-five men remained--barely enough to make sure
destruction of seven vessels of the rebel fleet, as follows: General Beauregard, blown up and burnt; General Sterling Price, one wheel carrienboats was continuous and exceedingly well directed. The General Beauregard and the Little Rebel were struck in the boilers and blown up. nt down in her, I have not been able to ascertain. The General Beauregard, blown up by her boilers and otherwise injured by shot, went downag-ship,) Gen. Price, Gen. Bragg, Jeff. Thompson, Gen. Lovell, Gen. Beauregard, Sumter, and Little Rebel, all rams, commanded by Commodore J.up to meet her. They come together, the Queen of the West ramming Beauregard a glancing lick near the stern. The Monarch is after another rebGeneral Price, General Bragg, Jeff. Thompson, General Lovell, General Beauregard, Sumter, and Little Rebel, all rams, and was under the comman Here the narrative of the fight terminates. The Jeff. Thompson, Beauregard, Sumter, and Bragg were respectively disabled, run ashore, or set
to evade the blockade, it was necessary to make some limitations to secure good faith. Indeed, gentlemen, you will remember that all rules and regulations are made to restrain bad men, and not the good. For instance : if I allowed the protections given now to avail for this purpose, that Prussian Consul might give them to the whole of his militia company that live to get back; and they might come, claiming to be neutral, as did that British guard who sent their arms and equipments to Beauregard. The naturalization laws of the United States were in abeyance for want of United States courts here. These provisions permitted all foreigners who had resided here five years and not claimed the protection of their government, who felt disposed to avail themselves of them, and thus become entitled to the high privileges of an American citizen, which so many foreigners value so greatly that they leave their own prosperous, peaceful, and happy countries to come and live here, even altho
artment, and a strong wish expressed for a change in the commanding officers. The South-Carolina troops are anxious to defend Charleston, and will do so successfully if they are permitted to. A report that we were to have the great services of Beauregard spread universal joy omong the troops. If, however, we cannot have Beauregard, we would be glad to get Huger, Magruder, Hill of North-Carolina, Whiting, Gregg, Joseph R. Anderson, or any other first-class general. A change of some kind is nec commanding officers. The South-Carolina troops are anxious to defend Charleston, and will do so successfully if they are permitted to. A report that we were to have the great services of Beauregard spread universal joy omong the troops. If, however, we cannot have Beauregard, we would be glad to get Huger, Magruder, Hill of North-Carolina, Whiting, Gregg, Joseph R. Anderson, or any other first-class general. A change of some kind is necessary to restore confidence to the troops and people.
Doc. 73.-the retreat from Corinth, Miss. General Beauregard's letter. the following was published in the Mobile News of the nineteenth of June. headquarters of Western Department, June 17, 1862. gentlemen: My attention has just been callfteen thousand stand of arms captured. Thousands of the enemy are throwing away their arms. A farmer says that when Beauregard learned that Col. Elliott had cut the railroad on his line of retreat, he became frantic, and told his men to save themrd story of that farmer. He ought to know that the burning of two or more cars on a railroad is not sufficient to make Beauregard frantic and ridiculous, especially when I expected to hear every moment of the capture of his marauding party, whose des to be seen whether his government and people are of the like opinion. I attest that all we lost at Corinth, and during the retreat, would not amount to one day's expenses of his army. Respectfully, your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard.
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