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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 3,199 167 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2,953 73 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 564 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 550 26 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 448 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 436 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 390 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 325 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 291 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 239 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for G. T. Beauregard or search for G. T. Beauregard in all documents.

Your search returned 29 results in 15 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Ocean Pond, Florida. (search)
were not printed by the Confederate Government, and so far as we know, were never before in print. They will be read with interest, and will be received as a valuable contribution to the material for the future historian: Report of General Beauregard.Headquarters Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, Charleston, S. C., March 25th, 1864. General,--In transmitting detailed reports of recent operations in East Florida, I have to accompany them, for the information of the Wanumbers at Ocean Pond, and I commend them to the notice of the government; they are, in all respects, worthy comrades of those who, on other fields, have done honor to Southern manhood. Respectfully, Your obedient servant, (Signed) G. T. Beauregard, General-Commanding. To General Samuel Cooper, Adjutant-and Inspector-General C. S. A., Richmond, Virginia. Report of General Joseph Finnegan.Headquarters District East Florida, in the field, twelve miles from Jacksonville, February 26,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The concentration before Shiloh-reply to Captain Polk. (search)
., and, on arriving, I was informed that General Beauregard desired to see me immediately. I rode fgg was present during his interview with General Beauregard. This is a significant fact, in connectaff of General Johnston's army, of which General Beauregard was the second in command; and still anoisti, Texas, I received a letter from General G. T. Beauregard, the second in command of the Confedelsewhere. * * * * * * * * * (Signed) G. T. Beauregard. Applying Colonel Johnston's logicalh, from Monterey, to General Johnston or General Beauregard, forms an important incident in the hist General Polk's version of an interview with Beauregard, near 4 o'clock P. M., would warrant the infhave been quite superfluous to have troubled Beauregard with such an unimportant narrative — especiaresent and had, doubtless, already stated to Beauregard the essential particulars of the march! A in it his own version of his interview with Beauregard on the field of Shiloh. This recalls the de
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Expedition into Maryland-battle of Monocacy and advance on Washington. (search)
ailroad westward, and also to destroy the coal mines and furnaces around Cumberland, unless I get different orders. I am sorry I did not succeed in capturing Washington and releasing our prisoners at. Point Lookout, but the latter was impracticable after I determined to retire from before Washington. There was intense excitement and alarm in Washington and Baltimore, and all over the North, and my force was very greatly exaggerated, it being reported that you were in command, having left Beauregard at Petersburg. Washington can never be taken by our troops, unless surprised when without a force to defend it. Please send me orders by telegraph to Winchester. Respectfully, J. A. Early, Lieutenant-General. General R. E. Lee, Commanding A. N. V. P. S.--I was compelled to leave about 400 wuonded men in Frederick, because they could not be transported. J. A. Early, Lieutenant-General. Since writing the above your letter of 11th received. A part of enemy's force has foll
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
al times called into line of battle on false alarms, the private soldier was forming his own plan of campaign when our great commander received information that Beauregard was being attacked at Manassas, and determined at once to hasten to his relief. Accordingly, about noon on the 18th of July Johnston left a cordon of Stuart' Gap and Manassas. As soon as we had gotten about two miles from Winchester there was read to us a ringing battle order from our chief, in which he stated that Beauregard was being attacked at Manassas by a greatly superior force — that this was a forced march to save the country, and that he expected us to step out bravely, to cdid not reach Piedmont until late that night. Incidents of the march were the wading of the Shenandoah — the cheers with which we greeted the announcement that Beauregard had defeated the attack upon him at Bull Run — the frequent raids we made on blackberry patches (a witty surgeon of our brigade remarked that our bill of fare o<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The concentration before Shiloh-reply to General Ruggles. (search)
as saying anything to wound the feelings of General Ruggles. My desire was to show that Polk was not responsible for the delay, as his movement was dependent on that of troops in his front. I had to show when and how those troops moved, but not a single word was written that could be twisted into a reflection upon them. For fear that some one might feel hurt, I even took pains to repudiate every intention of casting blame, claiming that the delay was due to the elements, and quoting General Beauregard in proof. Finally, the quotation from General Polk's official report was made in order to show that if there was an issue, it was, as General Polk distinctly made it, between General Bragg and General Polk. The General must, therefore, pardon me if I insist that he keep his place. His issue is with Colonel Johnston and Colonel Munford, who remove the responsibility from General Bragg's shoulders, where General Polk placed it, and put upon his General Ruggles's. I have no desire to fo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
a soldier of such decided ability, that he was destined to rise to the rank of lieutenant general, and give to Stonewall's quarter-master, (Gen. Banks) on his Red River expedition the additional sobriquet of Dick Taylor's commissary. Gen. Trimble rose to the rank of Major-General, lost a leg at Gettysburg and gave most untiring service to the cause he came from Maryland to expouse. Gen. Elzey was also a Marylander who had won a fine reputation in the old army, who had been called by Beauregard at First Manassas, the Blucher of the day, who became also a Major-General, and who was recognized as an accomplished and gallant soldier. Besides there were then serving in the division, J. A. Walker, J. E. B. Terrill, Geo. H. Steuart, B. T. Johnson, Hays, York, J. M. Jones, Posey, Canty and others, who afterwards won the wreath and stars. While watching Banks, and awaiting Jackson's movements, we luxuriated in the green fields, the beautiful groves the clear streams, the magnificen
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 7.50 (search)
succeeding days — the ovation given to Mrs. Jackson and Miss Julia, and General Lee, the drives, the reception, the superb dinners, the various entertainments, the lavish kindness of everybody — we have not space to speak. But we must say that Captain Charles Minnigerode, late of Richmond, who served on General Fitz. Lee's staff during the war, took naturally to his old vocation in serving General Lee, and also extended his kindness to us — that we received appreciated courtesies from General Beauregard, Dr. Jos. Jones, the first secretary of our Society, and others — and that the following committee were untiring in their efforts to entertain their guests, and to make the whole affair a grand success: Tomb Committee: W. R. Lyman, I. L. Lyons, L. A. Adam, F. A. Ober, J. H. Murray, J. B. Sinnot, J. B. Richardson, Joe. Buckner, D. R. Calder, E. D. Willett. We were most reluctantly compelled to tear ourselves away, (for it. did really seem that the Confederates had re-captured New
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Raid of Captain Wm. Miles Hazzard on St. Simon's Island. (search)
through your deserted allies, that the graves of our family and friends had been desecrated by your forces after the unsuccessful attempt to capture me some months ago. This rumor I could not believe, as the custom, even of the savage, has been to respect the home of the dead. But the sight I now behold convinces me of the truth of the report. I shuddered to think of the practice of bushwhacking, shooting sentinels on post, &c., which has always been discountenanced by my commander (General Beauregard), and my chief has spared many of your men. But let me tell you, sir, that beside these graves, I swear by heaven to avenge their desecration. If it is honorable for you to disturb the dead, I shall consider it an honor, and will make it my ambition, to disturb your living. I shall fancy, sir, the voice of the departed ones from their desecrated homes, exclaiming that such a nation may truly say to Corruption, thou art my father; to Dishonor, thou art my mother; Vandalism, thou art m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notice. (search)
ion that the South was the aggressor in the conflict which ensued. It is hard to see how Mr. Seward can be freed from the charge of flagrant bad faith in his dealings with the Confederate Commissioners sent to Washington for the purpose of negotiating an amicable transfer of the forts and other Federal property in the seceding States. Nor will reasonable men deny, now that nothing is to be gained by quibbling, that the first overt act of hostility was not the attack on Fort Sumter by General Beauregard, but the attempt to reinforce that post made in violation of the pledges repeatedly given by Mr. Seward to the Commissioners. We think no candid person can fail to be convinced by the simple documentary testimony brought forward by Mr. Davis that the seceding States were sincerely anxious to live on terms of peace and amity with those who adhered to the old Union, and that with very few exceptions, among which Mr. Davis must be counted, the leading men of the Confederacy believed up t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
eview:--In your issue of 31st ult. I note a communication signed Confederate, which unjustly claims for my old battery the distinguished honor of firing the last shot in the army of Northern Virginia. Your correspondent is mistaken. This honor has never been claimed by myself or any member of the battery as far as I know, and I think it an act of justice to correct any such impression. While the old battery was more than once named in general orders and frequently complimented by Generals Beauregard, Hoke, Pettigrew and others, and I feel proud of its record, I cannot claim for myself what is due some other gallant commander. Respectfully, Jas. D. Cumming. But the following from our gallant friend, Major Parker, seems to show that the honor really belonged to Johnson's Battery of Richmond: * * * * * * The last artillery shot was not fired by a battery stationed in the yard of Mr. Peers, but by a Richmond battery known as Johnson's battery, and once commanded by t
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