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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 3,199 167 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2,953 73 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 564 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 550 26 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 448 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 436 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 390 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 325 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 291 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 239 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for G. T. Beauregard or search for G. T. Beauregard in all documents.

Your search returned 36 results in 11 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. Headquarters in the field, Swi former orders of movements. [Signed] G. T. Beauregard, General Commanding. P. S. I have jith two days cooked rations. [Signed] G. T. Beauregard, General Commanding. Ransom moved atully, your obedient servant, [Signed] G. T. Beauregard, General. A high private's sketch ofed officer who commanded the department, General Beauregard, was not idle, and nothing was left undoins would mark the spot. Here, however, General Beauregard gave splendid evidence of his readiness comb's dash became a household word. There, Beauregard's commendation is their reward, as it was thment not only the South, but the world. General Beauregard, in his report of the battle, says: The shell and bullet were falling thickest, General Beauregard and staff dashed down the line of battle into the details of this great battle. General Beauregard says, in his report: The remnant of the [2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of services in Charleston Harbor. (search)
us acquired proved of essential service to us. On this occasion the following dispatch from General Gilmore to Admiral Dahlgren had been intercepted, and in General Beauregard's possession hours before the assault: Continue the bombardment throughout the day; at sunset redouble it. The assault will commence at seven. Notwithsta Time was necessary to do this, however, and time was the salvation of Charleston, for upon our side the distinguished officer who commanded the department, General Beauregard, was not idle, and nothing was left undone for the defence, not only of the outworks, but of the inner harbor, and of adjacent islands and inlets. The batt masonry from the outer wall fell as each shot struck, and ere many days it seemed as though nought but a pile of ruins would mark the spot. Here, however, General Beauregard gave splendid evidence of his readiness to meet emergencies, and of his skill as an engineer. As soon as it became evident that the fort must yield to th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. (search)
nnessee, now stands revealed in equal glory with the Washington Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia, and henceforth it is a rivalry between them in devotion to a sacred cause in hallowing a common name. Shiloh's field has also revealed officers and men unto each other, and amid those undying impressions of a first battle none proved stronger than the mutual confidence that then arose. There, deeds of courage foreshadowed future fame, and Slocomb's dash became a household word. There, Beauregard's commendation is their reward, as it was that of the four companies at Manassas. Henceforth the Washington Artillery is linked in trial and in glory to the Army of Tennessee. Glorious and grand old army! Defenders of the heart of the Confederacy, the tests to which your virtues were put called forth the highest qualities that soldiers could display. Unfailing courage, patience, endurance, fortitude and devotion marked your every step. From that field on it bore the stamp of misfort
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
sponded, and with all the steadiness of veterans, men, till then unversed in the rudiments of war, beat back the trained batteries of the Federal army, and by their skill and prowess filled with amazement not only the South, but the world. General Beauregard, in his report of the battle, says: The skill, the conduct and soldierly qualities of the Washington Artillery were all that could be desired. The officers and men engaged, won for their battalion a distinction, which I feel assured will n the French, they pommelled us, and we pommelled the hardest, so we gained the day. Stonewall Jackson and Bee's brigades supported and fought with our guns. During the heaviest of the conflict, when shell and bullet were falling thickest, General Beauregard and staff dashed down the line of battle, and reaching our position, halted and said, Colonel Walton, do you see the enemy? Yes. Then hold this position and the day is ours. Three cheers for Louisiana! The boys cheered heartily, and voi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
ualities of him of whom they spoke. He raised his eyes and replied to them: If Albert Sidney Johnston is not a General, the Confederacy has none to give you. By forced marches, his number diminished by disease, he effected a juncture with General Beauregard at Corinth, Miss., and on the 6th day of April, 1862, twenty-one years ago, fought the last and greatest battle of his life, and laid down that life for the cause to which he had given his heart and his sword. I will not attempt to go into the details of this great battle. General Beauregard says, in his report: The remnant of the enemy's army had been driven into utter disorder to the immediate vicinity of Pittsburg Landing, under the heavy guns of the iron-clad gunboats. Like an Alpine avalanche, our troops moved forward, despite the determined resistance of the enemy, and at 6 P. M. we were in possession of all his encampments between Owl and Lick Creeks but one, nearly all of his field artillery, thirty flags, colors and s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 50 (search)
along the line of the Memphis and Charleston railroad, with Corinth as its center and base. Having organized his splendid troops, General Johnston, with General Beauregard as second in command, put in motion on the morning of the 3d of April, 1862, the Army of the Mississippi, to offer battle to the invaders of our soil. The d a bulwark between us and their destruction or surrender. Amidst the confusion of orders, some to advance, some to retreat, occasioned by the general order of Beauregard to retire for the night, we were in a fated hour repulsed, never again to enjoy the pleasure of having them so near in our grasp. Time, such as Wellington prayand General Bragg placed in command of the Army.—Shortly after the evacuation of Corinth by our forces, which was completed on the night of the 29th of May, General Beauregard's health having for a time failed him, he was granted a leave of absence by the Department at Richmond, and General Bragg placed in full command of the Army
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
had sensibly declined. The fall of General Joseph E. Johnston and the Oppor-Tunity of Lee. Meanwhile the Army of Northern Virginia had made a name in history under its famous commander, Joseph E. Johnston, and I cannot speak that name without bowing the homage of my heart to the illustrious soldier and noble gentleman who bears it. Under his sagacious and brilliant leadership, his forces had been suddenly withdrawn from Patterson's front near Winchester, and united with those of General Beauregard at Manassas; and there, led by those two Generals, the joint command had, on July 21st, 1861, routed the Army of the Potomac in the first pitched battle of the war; had given earnest of what the volunteers of the South could do in action, and had crowned the new-born Confederacy with the glory of splendid military achievement. Still later in the progress of events, Johnston had exhibited again his strategic skill in holding Mc-Clellan at bay on the lines of Yorktown, with a force so s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. (search)
e. Resolved, That the secretary of the meeting communicate copies of these and our former resolutions to Mrs. Lee. Thus was originated the movement which has so happily resulted in suitably decorating the grave of Lee. The Lee Memorial Association was formally organized October 24th, 1870, with the following officers: President—General John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky. Vice-Presidents—General J. E. Johnston, General J. A. Early, and Colonel W. H. Taylor, of Virginia; General G. T. Beauregard, Louisiana; General D. H. Hill, North Carolina; General Wade Hampton, South Carolina; General J. B. Gordon, Georgia; General W. J. Hardee, Alabama; General S. D. Lee, Mississippi; General R. S. Ewell, Tennessee; General J. B. Hood, Texas; General I. R. Trimble, Maryland; General J. S. Marmaduke, Missouri; General William Preston, Kentucky; General Tappan, Arkansas. Treasurer—C. M. Figgatt, Bank of Lexington. Secretary—Colonel C. A. Davidson, of Lexington, Virginia. The Assoc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Virginia campaign of 1864-1865. (search)
. This ended the campaign against Richmond from the north side of the James, and ten days later the Federal army was on its march to try the approach by way of Petersburg and the Appomattox, where Butler had for some time been bottled up by Beauregard. The losses in battle of Grant's army had by this time reached nearly 50,000 men, according to General Humphreys (other Federal accounts make it much larger), and the reinforcements sent him about 28,000. Lee, on the other hand, had received g. The explosion of 8,000 pounds of powder buried a regiment of Confederates and made a fearful gap in their lines. An assault was at once made by Burnside's corps, supported by Hancock, Warren, and Ord. Some preparations had been made by General Beauregard against such a contingency, but only skill of the highest order, and a courage that counted life as nothing worth on the part of the handful of Confederates within reach, enabled them to resist the immense force sent against them. The assa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
at the hotel. The quiet of this Sabbath morning is disturbed by the sullen boom of cannon in the direction of Tennessee river. The blood boils in my veins, and moves me to shoulder arms and march to the scene of the conflict. Trusting not in Beauregard, nor in the valor of our troops, but in God, victory must perch upon our banners. Six o'clock P. M..—Have just halted for supper and a little rest, after a walk of ten miles. The incessant roar of artillery is still heard, and from the sick ous enough for a furlough, and yet too serious to admit of my reporting for duty. Many of my personal friends were killed in the bloody battle of Shiloh. The One Hundred and Fifty-fourth Tennessee regiment lost 196 in killed and wounded. General Beauregard, for some reason, failed to follow up the success of Sunday's battle, and on Monday the army retreated in good order, leaving the Federals too badly crippled to follow in pursuit. April 14th.—Reported for duty, and spent the morning clea
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