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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Manassas Beauregard or search for Manassas Beauregard in all documents.

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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: Maryland's overthrow. (search)
, the people had gathered to see the woman who was arming her husband's regiment, and they overwhelmed her with enthusiasm and hearty sympathy. At Petersburg a substantial sum of money was handed to her, and stopping at Richmond she procured from John Letcher, governor of Virginia, a supply of camp-kettles, hatchets, axes, etc., and with the money in her hands, ordered forty-one wall tents made at once. On the 31st of May she left Richmond with her arms, ammunition and supplies. At Manassas Beauregard gave her an order to take any train she might find necessary for transportation and to hold all trains subject to her orders. She rode in the freight car on her boxes of rifles. Companies A and B had during her absence been moved up to Harper's Ferry to unite with the rest of the command, and on June 3, 1861. after an absence of ten days from camp, she returned and delivered to her husband the results of her energy, devotion and enthusiasm. The following receipt from the chief of
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: Marylanders in the campaigns of 1861. (search)
1861, General McDowell moved out of Alexandria on Beauregard at Fairfax Court House. Beauregard retired behinBeauregard retired behind Bull Run. McDowell on the 19th made a heavy reconnoissance in force and found Beauregard's position. The lBeauregard's position. The latter called on Johnston for help. He left Winchester in the morning of the 18th and marched to Piedmont, on the meantime McDowell had thrown his right around Beauregard's left, turned his position, and at daylight of tlonel rode proudly down on the right of his line, Beauregard dashed up, filled with enthusiasm— Hail! Elzey, ria, and by night Stuart reported to Johnston and Beauregard that there was no organized force south of the Poas well of himself as any one ever thinks of him. Beauregard said they marched like Frenchmen. This set them ve ever marched or moved as brightly as they did. Beauregard's compliment was to his own people, not to ours. of battle. Variety is a virtue in a soldier. Beauregard wanted a line of Yankee posts along the Potomac o
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: Marylanders in 1862 under Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Stonewall Jackson. (search)
anders in 1862 under Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Stonewall Jackson. In November, 1861, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, then in command of the Confederate army of the Potomac, withdrew from the posts of Mason's and Munson's Hills, established by Beauregard, having information that McClellan was about to sweep them in. Beauregard had established a capital secret service, and his spies in Washington, in the departments and in McClellan's headquarters, kept his headquarters perfectly advised of the Beauregard had established a capital secret service, and his spies in Washington, in the departments and in McClellan's headquarters, kept his headquarters perfectly advised of the intentions of General McClellan. They had reported in time McDowell's projected movement on Bull Run, which resulted in the first battle of Manassas. In November Johnston withdrew from the line of Fairfax Court House to Centreville, in front of Bull Run, and in a month fell back to Bull Run, where he put his troops in camp for the winter. He made his men cover themselves in log huts, which were comfortable, but too warm and illventi-lated for troops in the field. During all this period the
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
f the almost victorious army of McDowell. For this gallant service he was complimented by General Beauregard, who styled him the Blucher of the field, and was promoted brigadier-general on the field he was promoted to brigadier-general April 16th, and General Van Dorn soon afterward wrote to Beauregard, I want Little as major-general. General Little commanded the rear-guard on the retreat from called to the aid of Albert Sidney Johnston, he embarked with his brigade for Memphis just as Beauregard was bringing Johnston's army back from Shiloh. Leading the advance of Price's division, he proceeded east of the Mississippi, and joined Beauregard at Corinth. Subsequently when Price was assigned to command the army of the West, with headquarters at Tupelo, Miss., he was given Price's old d, by the Federal army under Pope, on April 8th. He was exchanged later in the season, and General Beauregard, who had written to AdjutantGen-eral Cooper that he considered the services of Mackall as