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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for De Beck or search for De Beck in all documents.

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By leaving my baggage-train under a guard, in my last camp on the road, fourteen miles from McDowell, I was able to push forward so as to make the whole distance, thirty-four miles, in twenty-three hours. I added, however, but little numerical strength to the Army I was sent to relieve. My brigade, consisting of but three regiments, and with several companies then on detailed and other duty, brought into the field an aggregate of only about one thousand three hundred infantry, besides De Beck's battery of the First Ohio artillery and about two hundred and fifty men of the first battalion of Connecticut cavalry. With this help I reached Gen. Milroy at two o'clock A. M., on the eighth inst. I was, to use his own expression, just in time. I found his regiments of infantry partly in line of battle in the plain at McDowell, covering some of the various approaches from the mountain, and partly disposed as skirmishers on the heights in front, and his batteries in position, expectin
n I could, according to these instructions, in the direction indicated. I turned my artillery (De Beck's and Rigby's batteries) into and across the fields, supported by infantry, throwing the body oct of turning our right, as I had expected. A few shells thrown into the woods on that side by De Beck's battery, checked this movement and drove back the rebel infantry further to our left. The whcover to his retreat. But he was replied to with so quick and hot a return by Hyman, Rigby and De Beck, that his fire was very soon silenced, and as afterwards ascertained, both his guns dismounted.mith, of the Fifty-third; Col. Lee, of the Fifty-fifth; Col. Cantwell, of the Eighty-second; Capt. De Beck, of the First Ohio artillery, and Capt. Blakeslee, of company A, Connecticut cavalry, commanes are both at work. To the right, Gen. Schenck, with his characteristic energy, presses on. De Beck is shelling the woods, both to the right and in front. Captain Morgedant, of Gen. Schenck's st
our guns, which were turned on them, and must have done some execution. An hour after we received the order to move one brigade by the flank to the left and advance, which was done. We had obtained a good position for artillery, and stationed De Beck's First Ohio battery, which did excellent service, dismounting one of the enemy's guns, blowing up a caisson, and silencing their battery. Unfortunately, however, they were poorly supplied with ammunition, and soon compelled to withdraw. Our ttook position in the woods beyond. We here discovered that we were on the battle-ground of the night before, and found the hospital of Gibbon's brigade, who had engaged the enemy. The battery of the enemy still continued. We had no artillery, De Beck's and Schirmer's having given out, and Buell's battery, which had reported after a hot contest with the enemy, (who have every advantage in position and range,) was compelled to retire. It was now determined to flank the battery, and capture it
our guns, which were turned on them, and must have done some execution. An hour after we received the order to move one brigade by the flank to the left and advance, which was done. We had obtained a good position for artillery, and stationed De Beck's First Ohio battery, which did excellent service, dismounting one of the enemy's guns, blowing up a caisson, and silencing their battery. Unfortunately, however, they were poorly supplied with ammunition, and soon compelled to withdraw. Our ttook position in the woods beyond. We here discovered that we were on the battle-ground of the night before, and found the hospital of Gibbon's brigade, who had engaged the enemy. The battery of the enemy still continued. We had no artillery, De Beck's and Schirmer's having given out, and Buell's battery, which had reported after a hot contest with the enemy, (who have every advantage in position and range,) was compelled to retire. It was now determined to flank the battery, and capture it
onel Greisel, Colonel Dan McCook, and Lieut.-Colonel Laiboldt, behaved with great gallantry, leading their troops at all times. Neither can I speak too highly of Captains Hescock and Barnett, and the officers and men of their batteries. I respectfully bring to the notice of the General Commanding the excellent conduct of Surgeon Griffiths, Medical Director of the division, who was untiring in his care for the wounded on all parts of the field. Also the following officers of my staff: Captain Beck, A. D.C.; Lieut. George Lee, Acting A. A.G.; Lieut. Van Pelt, Division Commander, and Lieuts. Denning and Burton, for their alacrity in bearing orders and other valuable assistance rendered me during the day. The total casualties in my division were as follows: Killed,44 Wounded,274 Missing,12   Total,330 I enclose herewith a list of the same, giving names, rank, company and regiment. This report is also accompanied by the reports of brigade and battery commanders. I am