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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 2 2 Browse Search
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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 11: conferences after the battle of Manassas. (search)
his complete demoralization. As far as our cavalry went, no hostile force was met, and all the indications favored the conclusion that the purpose of invasion had for the time been abandoned. The victory, though decisive and important, both in its moral and physical effect, had been dearly bought by the sacrifice of the lives of many of our bravest and best, who at the first call of their country had rushed to its defence. When riding to the front, I met an ambulance bearing General Barnard Bee from the field, where he had been mortally wounded, after his patriotism had been illustrated by conspicuous exhibitions of skill, daring, and fortitude. Soon after, I learned that my friend, Colonel Bartow, had heroically sealed with his life-blood his faith in the sanctity of our cause. He had been the chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs in the Provisional Congress, and after the laws were enacted to provide for the public defence, he went to the field to maintain them.
played under the most furious fire, rendered inestimable service. To Maryland we owe also Snowdon Andrews, the brave and skilled artillery officer, who was so desperately wounded upon the field of Cedar Run that his surgeon reported hardly enough of his body left to hold his soul. South Carolina gave us Stephen Elliott, who remained in beleaguered Sumter, and when invited to take rest only did so because promoted and ordered elsewhere; the Hamptons, Kershaw, Hugers, Ramseur, M. C. Butler, Bee, Bonham, Bartow, Drayton, the Prestons, Dick Anderson, Jenkins, and Stephen D. Lee, commander of artillery in Virginia and corps commander in the Army of Tennessee, a body of fine gentlemen who illustrated the proverbial daring of their class. She also gave Colonel Lucius B. Northrop, a gallant soldier of the old army, and one who, as Commissary General, possessed Mr. Davis's confidence unto the end of our struggle. North Carolina sent Pettigrew, who commanded Heth's division in the cha
ed his complete demoralization. As far as our cavalry went, no hostile force was met, and all the indications favored the conclusion that the purpose of invasion had for the time been abandoned. The victory, though decisive and important, both in its moral and physical effect, had been dearly bought by the sacrifice of the lives of many of our bravest and best, who at the first call of their country had rushed to its defense. When riding to the front, I met an ambulance bearing General Barnard Bee from the field, where he had been mortally wounded, after his patriotism had been illustrated by conspicuous exhibitions of skill, daring, and fortitude. Soon after, I learned that my friend Colonel Bartow had heroically sealed with his life blood his faith in the sanctity of our cause. He had been the chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs in the provisional Congress, and, after the laws were enacted to provide for the public defense, he went to the field to maintain them.
T., 233, 236, 295, 299, 300, 301,302, 303, 305, 306,307, 308, 309, 312, 315, 317, 382, 386, 387, 396. Dispatches from Confederate Commissioners at Washington, 238. Correspondence concerning bombardment of Fort Sumter, 244-49. Bombardment of Fort Sumter, 252-53. Conference with Davis, 312-13. Letters from Davis concerning Manassas, 317-18. Plan for Manassas and endorsement, 319-21. Letter from Davis concerning organization of troops by states, 385-86. Beckham, Lieut., 325. Bee, Gen., Barnard, 310. Bell, John, 44, 45. Belmont (Mo.), Battle of, 345-46. Beltzhoover, —, 345. Benjamin, Judah P., 391. Selected as Attorney-General (Confederacy), 207-09. Berrien, —, 13-14. Bethel Church, Battle of, 297. Bigler, —, 58. Bingham, S. K., 215. Blair, Austin, 215. Col. F. P., 359, 364. Montgomery, 233-34, 238. Bonham, Gen. M. L., 260,307, 308, 309. Booneville, Battle of, 364. Boston Memorial Presentation to Congress, 140. Extract on equali<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Joseph E. Johnston. (search)
h which, one month later, he eluded Patterson's army of more than thirty thousand, and hurled his own from the mountains upon McDowell, was the master-stroke of Manassas—Johnston's rear column, under Kirby Smith, coming upon the field, just as Barnard Bee was falling, and Jackson's Stonewall the last Gibraltar. Just when the South Carolina Brigade was hardest pressed, an aide or courier of Bee, meeting Johnston, asked, Where are your Virginians? In the thickest of the fight, was the Spartan aBee, meeting Johnston, asked, Where are your Virginians? In the thickest of the fight, was the Spartan answer. It was a victory won by an army which itself barely grazed defeat, and one, therefore, difficult to pursue. But in this cursory glance one thing cannot be omitted—the full credit which Johnston everywhere gives Beauregard. The bold design submitted by the military officers, in a council of war, at Manassas in September, 1861, to concentrate at that point the strength of the Confederacy, even at the cost of leaving bare of defense points more remote, so that there might be taken an a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Strategic points. (search)
on, and go back to strategic points. McDowell moved out of Washington with the Grand Army, and developing Beauregard's outposts, soon pressed them back upon the reserves and precipitated the indecisive battle, 18th of July, 1861. Pausing then, McDowell took advantage of his information to study the situation and plan accordingly. Beauregard, finding his force inadequate, appealed to Johnston, then at Winchester, for assistance. His prompt response is too well known to detail here; how Bee and Bartow died; how Kirby Smith, coming into line almost on the run upon McDowell's flank, and Jackson standing like a stone wall, snatched victory from defeat, and turned the triumph of the foe into an utter rout. The plains of Manassas drank in the best blood of the South, but victory laid her crown of immortelles upon the banner of the stars and bars. Manassas, heretofore an insignificant railroad crossing, became the base of the Confederate army. Roads, both dirt and rail, radiated
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Gen. Turner W., how killed, 224. Association of Army of Northern Va., Virginia Division; Reunion of, 57; officers of, 103; Louisiana Division of, 160. Augusta Battery, 262. Avery, Hon. A. C., 110, 340. Badeau's History of Grant, cited, 61. Badger, Richard, 110. Baker, Hon. Richard H., 336. Baker, Sallie, 37. Barlow, U. S. A., Gen, 338. Barringer, Gen., Rufus, 340. Battaile, J. E., Poem of, 201. Battery Gregg, 77. Battery Lamb, 289 Beauregard, Gen. G. T., 376. Bee, Capt., Barnard, 115. Beecher, Rev., Henry Ward, 200. Beecher, Rev., Thos. K., 17. Bentonville, Battle of, 149. Bethel, Battle of, 118 Bibles Through the Blockade, 265. Bland, C. C., Heroism of, 271. Blanton, Corporal L. M., 109. Blockade Running, 263. Blocker, Capt. C. H , 280. Bloody Angle, The, 228. Bordunix, William, 343. Bowles, C. S. Navy, Surgeon R. C., 294. Bragg, Petition for the removal of Gen.; favored by President Davis, 143, 266, 325. Breckinridge, Gen. Jo