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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 24, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memorial address (search)
vy fire to congratulate and praise a member of the Palmetto regiment, who was behaving under fire most gallantly. For his services on that day he received honorable mention from his immediate commanders and also from Colonel McGruder, commanding a light battery, which battery Lieutenant Hill offered to support when it was menaced by a body of Mexican lancers. He received the brevet appointment of major, and was considered a loss to the service when he resigned. Your obedient servant, Bernard Bee, Captain U. S. Army. From the scores of her surviving heroes of the Palmetto regiment and in the regular army the committee appointed by the State authorities selected Hill to receive one of the three swords awarded, and it is still preserved by his family. After the close of the late war a Federal soldier wrote to General Joseph E. Johnston asking the name of a Confederate officer who, on the right of our army at Seven Pines, had made himself most conspicuous for his daring and in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
army joined us. The imperturbable coolness of a great commander was preemi-nently his. He was always calm and self-controlled. He never lost his balance for one moment. At the First Manassas, when we reached the field and found our men under Bee and Bartow falling back—when the confusion was greatest, and Bee in despair cried out, They are driving us back—there was not the slightest emotion apparent about him. His thin lips were compressed and his eyes ablaze when he curtly said: Then, siBee in despair cried out, They are driving us back—there was not the slightest emotion apparent about him. His thin lips were compressed and his eyes ablaze when he curtly said: Then, sir, we will give them the bayonet. At Port Republic, where he was so nearly captured, as he escaped he instantly ordered the 37th Virginia Regiment, which was fortunately near at hand and in line, to charge through the bridge and capture the Federal piece of artillery placed at its mouth. In the very severe engagement at Chantilly, fought during a heavy thunder storm, when the voice of the artillery of heaven could scarcely be told from that of the army, an aide came up with a message from A<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.37 (search)
Professor of Mathematics by remain as you are. Next year he went off to the great war between the States, and won fame at once. Rumors of a great victory came. His wife and friends were anxious for the news. It came by a courier, who spurred in hot haste to his home, in Lexington. These were the words: My subscription to the negro Sunday-school is due—it is fifty cents—which I send by the courier. Nothing more. At the First Manassas his fame was made, when that noble soldier, Bernard Bee, cried out to his wavering men, See where Jackson, with his Virginians, stands like a stone wall! Let us form behind them. After the repulse at Malvern Hill, General Lee and other generals were discussing the situation, and what we were to do in the morning. Jackson was lying upon the ground, apparently slumbering, his cap lying over his face. He was aroused and asked his opinion of what was to be done in the morning. Removing the cap from his face, he said: They won't be there in
The distinguished dead. --The Central train, which arrived in this city at eight o'clock last night, brought down the bodies of Col. (acting Brig. Gen.) Francis S. Bartow, of Georgia, Gen. Bernard Bee, of South Carolina, and Lieut. Col. Johnson, of Hampton Legion, who fell in the battle at Manassas on Sunday last. Three hearses were in readiness, and the remains of the brave dead were conveyed, (escorted by the Armory Guard, Lieut. Kerr, preceded by their band playing a funeral dirge,) to the Capitol, where the bodies were attended during the night by a guard of honor specially detailed for that purpose. They will be carried South this morning. Colonel. Bartow died a noble and brave death. He first received a shot which shattered one of his feet; but even in this disabled condition he maintained his place at the head of his men. He had reached a fence which crossed the direction of his charge, and was supporting himself, waving his sword and cheering his gallant band on t