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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 41 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 33 1 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 31 1 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 22 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 20 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 1 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 14 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Bee or search for Bee in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 2 document sections:

going to fight Banks if he has a million of men! Walker's division occupied the right of the road facing Pleasant Hill, with Buchel's and Terrell's cavalry, under Bee, on the right. On the left of the same road was Mouton's superb division of Louisianians, with Major's division of cavalry (dismounted) on Mouton's left. Each divd the fate of the Thirteenth. Nothing could arrest the astonishing ardor and courage of our troops. Green, Polignac, Major, Bagby and Randal, on the left; Walker, Bee, Scurry and Waul, on the right, swept all before them. Flight on the part of the Thirteenth and Nineteenth corps, dropping curses with the booty—on our part, puf the 10th found us in possession of Pleasant Hill. The enemy had retreated stealthily in the night, leaving his dead unburied and some 400 wounded in our hands. Bee took up the pursuit and held it for 20 miles without receiving a check, capturing prisoners, and finding at every step the same evidences of rout as had marked the
reating army could not but enter. The small end of the bag was at the ferry. Taylor had ordered Bee, a valued lieutenant, to hold the ferry before the arrival of the enemy. Apparently, Bee misapprBee misapprehended precisely why he was to be at the crossing. Before the Federals appeared, he had already withdrawn his troops from the gate. General Bee, who reported that his 2,000 men were in line undGeneral Bee, who reported that his 2,000 men were in line under seven hours continuous fire before giving up the ferry, said in his defense: That I was not successful was because success was impossible. ... I claim for my troops (Gould's, Wood's, Terrell's, Liantry, patient endurance of fatigue, and never-failing enthusiasm. Gen. John A. Wharton wrote to Bee, June 30th, From an examination of the ground, and from a full knowledge of your force and that os, there where Banks' campaign had opened two months before in pride, it now closed in disaster. Bee's blunder cost Taylor Banks' army. Wharton's blunder cost him Smith's division. With the Federa