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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 41 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 33 1 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 31 1 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 22 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 20 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 1 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 14 14 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Bee or search for Bee in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
id the battalion do yeoman service. Posted upon the ridge, near the Henry House, they fought the batteries of Ricketts and Griffin, which were finally abandoned on the field. It was a case very similar to the description given by the Duke of Wellington to a lady, who asked him at a dinner party to describe to her the battle of Waterloo. The battle of Waterloo, ma'am? Why, we pommelled the French, they pommelled us, and we pommelled the hardest, so we gained the day. Stonewall Jackson and Bee's brigades supported and fought with our guns. During the heaviest of the conflict, when shell and bullet were falling thickest, General Beauregard and staff dashed down the line of battle, and reaching our position, halted and said, Colonel Walton, do you see the enemy? Yes. Then hold this position and the day is ours. Three cheers for Louisiana! The boys cheered heartily, and voice after voice caught up the cheer along the line. Thus, in the two engagements of July 18 and 21 the trial
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
id the battalion do yeoman service. Posted upon the ridge, near the Henry House, they fought the batteries of Ricketts and Griffin, which were finally abandoned on the field. It was a case very similar to the description given by the Duke of Wellington to a lady, who asked him at a dinner party to describe to her the battle of Waterloo. The battle of Waterloo, ma'am? Why, we pommelled the French, they pommelled us, and we pommelled the hardest, so we gained the day. Stonewall Jackson and Bee's brigades supported and fought with our guns. During the heaviest of the conflict, when shell and bullet were falling thickest, General Beauregard and staff dashed down the line of battle, and reaching our position, halted and said, Colonel Walton, do you see the enemy? Yes. Then hold this position and the day is ours. Three cheers for Louisiana! The boys cheered heartily, and voice after voice caught up the cheer along the line. Thus, in the two engagements of July 18 and 21 the trial
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The annual meeting of the Southern Historical Society. (search)
cted in honor of the Federal soldiers who fell there. The other, over the knoll where Fitz John Porter charged, commemorates the brave men of his corps who there died in the vain attempt to drive Jackson from the old railroad cut. At the Henry house I looked about for other memorials. Nothing is to be seen. The little shaft placed to mark the spot where Barton fell has been chipped away entirely by curiosity vandals. A little cedar bush alone enables the guide to point out the place where Bee poured out his blood, from which he baptized Jackson with his name of Stonewall. Nothing marks where Jackson and his men stood like a stone wall; and yet in all the ages to come the last memory of that first battle of Manassas to fade out of the knowledge and admiration of mankind will be that Stonewall! Understand me, comrades. Not one word have I to say in criticism of the monuments placed to commemorate the brave deeds of the Union soldiers who died on that field; but if these men be w