hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 41 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 33 1 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 31 1 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 22 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 20 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 1 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 14 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 14 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 25, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Bee or search for Bee in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

winds are rapidly laying bare the few remaining boughs of the trees around poor old Mrs. Henry's house, where she was shot in her bed, and where her remains now die interred in the yard close by. A dull and dreary day it was, befitting the harrowing scenes that presented themselves. The wind was sighing among the pine trees, and whistling through the perforated roof of the shattered dwelling. A marble shaft marks the spot where Col. Bartow received his mortal wound. The place where Gen. Bee fell is within a hundred yards, and not far off 250 of the enemy lie buried. In another spot on the opposite hill another heap of invaders were placed beneath the sod. The water all around has been so tainted by their mortal remains that it cannot be used by the occupants of the neighboring farm houses — a just retribution, if it is true that those same people were the means of guiding the invaders to the ground, as has been inferred. Near this place the Fourth Alabama regiment encoun