Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Barnard E. Bee or search for Barnard E. Bee in all documents.

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a few hours' rest. A little after sunrise on Sunday morning, the lamentable Gen. Bee sent for me to his quarters, and informed me of the approach of the enemy, andive miles we met the infantry of the brigade, who had gone by a nearer route. Gen. Bee, in person, then joined the battery, and rode with us about a mile and selecteediately loaded with spherical-case shot, with the fuze cut for 1,500 yards. General Bee ordered me not to fire till they opened on me, as he had sent the Fourth Alaand exploded near the top of the hill. We instantly returned the compliment. Gen. Bee then directed me to hold my position till further orders, and observe the enemposition near Stone Bridge; here I was ordered to halt and await orders from General Bee. Shortly after half-past 8 o'clock A. M., I detached two rifle guns, under ance. We had lost numbers of our most distinguished officers. Gens. Bartow and Bee had been stricken down; Lieut-Col. Johnson, of the Hampton Legion, had been kill
e were led on by Colonel Jackson, Colonel Bartow, General Bee, and General Jones. The conflict went on in a finset, but recovering they began to bear him back. Gen. Bee, with his brigade, then came to his support. Thatlance, which, he said, contained the late lamented Gen. Bee. The General lay prostrate, and almost expiring, left breast. Nor less lamented is the death of Gen. Bee. He has been regarded as one among the best milit of the road, and had opened a most galling fire. Gens. Bee and Bartow, and Hampton's Legion, rallied to sustaown the hill. Against the first of these it was that Bee and Bartow fought and fell, and at length, at fearfulAt the crisis of this contest, it happened also to Gen. Bee to have contributed, in a special way, to the resuthe attack of the enemy was met by the brigade of General Bee, composed of Mississippians and Alabamians, and o Georgia regiment, commanded by Colonel Gartrell. General Bee's brigade could not withstand the fierce tornado
ion in which the importance and splendor of the victory prompts us to indulge. And the death of those noble men causes us to realize our increased obligation to Him who ruleth in the armies of heaven and earth, and to fall down in adoring gratitude, and give the honor of the success to the God whom we serve. His right arm won the victory for our arms, and to Him would we ascribe the glory.--Charleston Courier, July 23. While we rejoice for our success, many homes have the shadow of death round about, and the voice of weeping, the wail of widowhood, the sharp cry of orphanage, are in our land. We have bought our victory dearly, paid for it the purchase-blood of the brave. While we drop a tear for the noble, the manly, the gallant heroic, for our Bartow, and Bee, and Johnson, and Stovall, and the whole long list of glory's children, and while we mourn with their families and friends, let us thus be nerved all the more to strike, strike again.--Atlanta (Ga.) Sentinel, July 23.
2. Leonidas Polk, La., Episcopal Bishop of La. Brigadier-Generals in the Provisional army. 1. P. T. G. Beauregard, Capt. Engs. U. S. A. 2. Braxton Bragg, La., Capt. Art. U. S. A. 3. M. L. Bonham, S. C., Congressman from S. C. 4. John B. Floyd, Va., U. S. Sec. of War. 5. Ben. McCullough, Texas, Maj. Texas Rangers. 6. Wm. H. T. Walker, Ga., Lieut.-Col. Inft. U. S. A. 7. Henry A. Wise, Va., late Gov. of Va. 8. H. R. Jackson, Ga., late Minister to Austria. 9. Barnard E. Bee, S. C., Capt. Inft. U. S. A. 10. Nathan G. Evans, S. C., Major Inft. U. S. A. 11. John B. Magruder,, Va., Major Art. U. S. A. 12. Wm. J. Hardee, Ga., Lieut.-Col. Cav. U. S. A. 13. Benj. Huger, S. C., Major Ordnance U. S. A. 14. Robert S. Garnett, Va., Major Inft. U. S. A. There have been other appointments made, but they are not yet known outside of the War Office. Gens. Fauntleroy, Winder, Cocke, Ruggles, and Holmes are in the Provisional Army of Virginia. Gens. Theophi
ay by numbers of the wounded, dying, and retiring, who declared that the day had gone against us; that Sloan's regiment, the 4th, was cut to pieces; that Hampton's Legion, coming to the rescue, and the Louisiana battalion, were annihilated; that Gen. Bee and Col. Hampton were mortally wounded, and Col. Ben. Johnson killed; and that the Confederate forces were out-flanked and routed, and the day lost. This was the unvarying tenor of the words that greeted us from the wounded and dying and the fu day won, and the long bright Sabbath closed, a lovely full moon looking down calmly and peacefully upon the bloodiest field that the continent of America ever witnessed. Our loss is fully two thousand killed and wounded. Among the killed are Gen. Bee, of South Carolina; Gen. E. K. Smith, Gen. Bartow, of Georgia; Col. Moore and all the Alabama field officers; Col. Fisher and the North Carolina field officers; Adjutant Branch of Georgia, and a host of other leading men. Thomas G. Duncan, of