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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 34 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 0 Browse Search
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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
. March to Nashville, Tenn., October 22-November 7, and duty there till December 26. Advance on Murfreesboro December 26-30. Lavergne December 26-27. Wilkinson's Cross Roads December 29. Battle of Stone's River December 30-31, 1862, and January 1-3, 1863. Overall's Creek December 31, 1862. Lavergne January 1, 1863. Lytle's Creek January 5. At Murfreesboro till March, 1863. Mustered out March 24, 1863. Lost during service 1 killed and 5 by disease. Total 6. Bell's Independent Company Militia Cavalry Organized at Altoona June 30, 1863. Mustered out August 9, 1863. Brown's Independent Company Militia Cavalry Organized at Harrisburg June 19, 1863. Mustered out August 1, 1863. Comley's Independent Company Militia Cavalry Organized at Harrisburg July 19, 1863. Mustered out July 30, 1863. Dick's Independent Company Militia Cavalry Organized at Pittsburg July 9, 1863. Mustered out October 5, 1863. Hammill's Independent Co
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States Colored Troops. (search)
ssippi Heavy Artillery (African Descent). Designated 5th Heavy Artillery March 11, 1864, and 6th Heavy Artillery April 26, 1864. Attached to Post of Natchez, Miss., District of Vicksburg, Miss., Dept. of Tennessee, and Dept. of Mississippi to February, 1865. Post of Natchez, Dept. of Mississippi, to April, 1865. Dept. of the Gulf to May, 1866. Service. Duty at Natchez, Miss., and Vidalia, La., till May, 1866. Skirmish near Vidalia, La., July 22, 1864. Attack on Steamer Clara Bell July 24, 1864 (4 Cos.). Expedition from Natchez to Gillespie's Plantation, La., August 4-6, 1864. Concordia Bayou August 5. Expedition from Natchez to Buck's Ferry and skirmish September 19-22, 1864. Expedition from Natchez to Waterproof and Sicily Island September 26-30, 1864. Expedition from Natchez to Homichitto River October 5-8, 1864. Expedition from Vidalia to York Plantation, La., October 26-27, 1864. Skirmish at Black River October 31 and November 1, 1864. M
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the Third winter. (search)
rrest arrives at Jackson without having been molested. Colonel Bell was waiting for him there with a small body of troops rove of livestock, and all men without arms, escorted by Colonel Bell and his troopers. About five hundred combatants under e the Federals await him. In the morning of the 25th, while Bell causes the wagons, the drove of live-stock, and the recruit the attention of the enemy to La Grange. During this time Bell started out with an equal force to take possession of the Le wagons. On the 27th, at eleven o'clock in the morning, Bell reached, without being perceived, the approaches to the bri vessels that have remained at sea under the orders of Commodore Bell will be joined to the expedition that Banks, after a lstructions of General Banks to the former and those of Commodore Bell to the latter were definite. The naval commander, havay have since then said, his instructions and those of Commodore Bell were positive: the naval forces were to commence by de
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the war in the South-West. (search)
y from that town to West Point, and, taking with him Bell's brigade, he marched rapidly on the tracks of the lbus by the left bank of the Tombigbee, he had caused Bell's brigade, then commanded by Colonel Barteau, to passon on the morning of the 11th of April, followed by Bell's brigade and a battery of artillery. In the afterntack until he heard the musketry fire on the north. Bell, who follows him closely, is to land on this side, g to him, driving the enemy's skirmishers before him, Bell on his march meets unforeseen difficulties, and the soon as his reconnoissance is ended, Forrest causes Bell to occupy the heights situated north-east of the fors the Confederates are already masters of the rest. Bell, having taken possession of the heights pointed out the entrance of Coal Creek and had fired briskly on Bell's right wing. It had been agreed between him and Boposition: the Hastings had broken her rudder; the Clara Bell and the Emerald were trying in vain to drag the A