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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 13: England.—June, 1838, to March, 1839.—Age, 27-28. (search)
of whom were aged, and full of reminiscences of great orators; women, whose learning, cleverness, or grace enriched the thought and embellished the society of their day. He was received as a guest, sometimes with the familiarity of a kinsman, into the houses of Denman, Vaughan, Parke, Alderson, Langdale, and Coltman, among judges; of Follett, Rolfe (Lord Cranworth), Wilde, Crowder, Lushington, and D'Oyly, among lawyers; of Hayward, Adolphus, Clark, Bingham, Wills, Theobald, Starkie, and Professor Bell, among law-writers and reporters; of Hallam, Parkes, Senior, Grote, Jeffrey, Murray, Carlyle, Rogers, Talfourd, Whewell, and Babbage, among men of learning, culture, and science; of Maltby, Milman, and Sydney Smith, among divines; of Robert Ingham, John Kenyon, Monckton Milnes (Lord Houghton), Basil Montagu, and Charles Vaughan, among genial friends who wrote or loved good books; of Brougham, Durham, Inglis, Cornewall Lewis, Campbell, Labouchere, Hume, and Roebuck, among statesmen and pa
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
erybody was out of town, so that I saw only comparatively a few persons; but they were the élite. Among others, I saw Professor Bell, the venerable author of the work on Commercial Law. George Joseph Bell, 1770-1843. He came out to Lord Jeffrey's George Joseph Bell, 1770-1843. He came out to Lord Jeffrey's at dinner, though, poor man, he eat nothing, as his physicians had cut him off from dinner: he afterwards came to Sir William Hamilton's, where he eat nothing. I breakfasted with him; and he was so good as to go with me over the courts, and explain old friend. I shall not fail to write the Chancellor the agreeable inquiries which have been made with regard to him by Mr. Bell, and also by Pardessus at Paris. You are perhaps aware that Clark, the bookseller, has published a neat volume, contain with Reports of Decided Cases. the author of the Consistory Reports, who is a bland, noble gentleman, of seventy. He and Bell are both clerks of Session, as Scott was; so that they are entirely comfortable. Robertson, who has written a work on Per