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Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 2, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Steam navigation. (search)
curing the exclusive use of the Hudson for steam navigation under grant of legislature made in 1798Aug., 1807 Phoenix, a single-screw propeller built by John Stevens, makes the first sea voyage of a steam-vessel from New York to Philadelphia1808 First steamboat on the St. Lawrence River, the Accommodation, runs from Montreal to Quebec1809 First steamboat on the western rivers, a stern-wheeler, is built by Fulton at Pittsburg1811 Comet, first passenger steamboat built in Europe, by Henry Bell, runs on the Clyde 7 1/2 miles per hour. Jan. 18,1812 Steam ferry between New York and Jersey City1812 First steam-vessel on the Thames, brought by Mr. Dodd from Glasgow1815 First steamboat on the Great Lakes, the Ontario, built at Sackett's Harbor, N. Y.1816 Walk-in-the-Water, a steamboat for Lake Erie, launched at Black Rock (now part of Buffalo, N. Y.)May 28, 1818 Savannah, Capt. Stevens Rogers, a steamboat of 350 tons, built in New York City, crosses the Atlantic from Savannah to
nd my little comprehension, and I was careful never to disturb him by question or remark. The books ranged around filled me too with a solemn awe. On the lower shelves were enormous folios, on whose backs I spelled in black letters, Lightfoot Opera, a title whereat I wondered, considering the bulk of the volumes. Above these, grouped along in friendly, social rows, were books of all sorts, sizes, and bindings, the titles of which I had read so often that I knew them by heart. There were Bell's Sermons, Bonnett's Inquiries, Bogue's Essays, Toplady on Predestination, Boston's Fourfold State, Law's Serious .Call, and other works of that kind. These I looked over wistfully, day after day, without even a hope of getting something interesting out of them. The thought that father could read and understand things like these filled me with a vague awe, and I wondered if I would ever be old enough to know what it was all about. But there was one of my father's books that proved a min
most beautiful children I ever saw, whose little hands literally deluged us with flowers. At the village of Helensburgh we stopped a little while to call upon Mrs. Bell, the wife of Mr. Bell, the inventor of the steamboat. His invention in this country was at about the same time as that of Fulton in America. Mrs. Bell came to Mr. Bell, the inventor of the steamboat. His invention in this country was at about the same time as that of Fulton in America. Mrs. Bell came to the carriage to speak to us. She is a venerable woman, far advanced in years. They had prepared a lunch for us, and quite a number of people had come together to meet us, but our friends said there was not time for us to stop. We rode through several villages after this, and met everywhere a warm welcome. What pleased me was,Mrs. Bell came to the carriage to speak to us. She is a venerable woman, far advanced in years. They had prepared a lunch for us, and quite a number of people had come together to meet us, but our friends said there was not time for us to stop. We rode through several villages after this, and met everywhere a warm welcome. What pleased me was, that it was not mainly from the literary, nor the rich, nor the great, but the plain, common people. The butcher came out of his stall and the baker from his shop, the miller dusty with flour, the blooming, comely young mother, with her baby in her arms, all smiling and bowing, with that hearty, intelligent, friendly look, as if
ried, 55; letter to, 61; accompanies sister to Europe, 269; letters from H. B. S. to, on love for New England, 61; on visit to Windsor, 235. Beecher, Roxanna Foote, mother of H. B. S., 1; her death, 2; strong, sympathetic nature, 2; reverence for the Sabbath, 3; sickness, death, and funeral, 4; influence in family strong even after death, 5; character described by H. W. Beecher, 502; H. B. S.'s resemblance to, 502. Beecher, William, brother of H. B. S., 1; licensed to preach, 56. Bell, Henry, English inventor of steamboat, 215. Belloc, Mme., translates Uncle Tom, 247. Belloc, M., to paint portrait of H. B. S., 241. Bentley, London publisher, offers pay for Uncle Tom's Cabin, 202. Betty's bright idea, date of, 491. Bible, 48; Uncle Tom's, 262; use and influence of, 263. Bible Heroines, date of, 491. Bibliography of H. B. S., 490. Biography, H. B. S.'s remarks on writing and understanding, 126. Birney, J. G., office wrecked, 81 et seq.; H. B. S.'s sym
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, C. S. A. From the Lexington, Ky. Herald, April 21, 1907. (search)
, Ky., in 1824, the son of William L. Hickman and Sarah Pearson, his wife, both of whom were born in Virginia. He was the grandson of Richard Hickman, who was Governor of Kentucky during the war of 1812. Through his mother he was American Rebel, the leader of what is called Bacon's Rebellion, in Virginia in 1676. Billy Hickman, as his friends fondly called him, was educated in the Winchester schools, and went into the mercantile business there at an early age. In 1847 he was partner with Henry Bell in a mercantile house in Lexington. A few years later he went to St. Louis. He was the founder of the Lodge of Odd Fellows in Winchester, which is called Hickman Lodge, in his honer. When the war began he was in St. Louis, and enlisted in a body of Confederate troops that was raised there, but he was captured by General Seigle, and imprisoned. He escaped from prison and made his way to his home in Winchester, where he was again arrested, and paced in prison in Lexington, but escaped fr
eal, Mordecai Taylor. Killed4 Wounded40 Total44 Total number engaged in the tow days' fight, 273. Wm Broun, 1st Lieut., Acting Adjutant 47th Virginia Reg. Casualties in the 44th Virginia regiment, ( Lt. Col. A. C Jones, commending,) Elzey's Brigade, in the Statute of of Friday, 27th inst: Killed is 1st Serg't John F Hagby, Company C.--Wounded: Lt. Col. A C Jones, Adj't C Y Steptoe, C H Harises, co H; Capt Wm Gilliam, co I; Lt co B, Lt H G Richardson, co G; Henry Bell, Co F, Fabert Armistond, co G; Allen Blanton, co H; J A W co H; Charles Rutcheson, co I, Wm J H co H Beverely wounded. Privates Alace and bb co. D. List of killed and wounded is the 11st Alabama regiment in of the 27th June Lieut Col. S F wounded. L. W. B Young, slightly; Privates A F Wayne, and rely; L B Hackaby, T R Johnson, do; A A Johnson, seriously; F E Safety, J R Conts, Wm Griffith, Wm Worthington. Total wounded, 10. Company B.--Killed Jar F Allen, H T Ciml