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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 1 Browse Search
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). Col. Samuel S. Sumner. 6th Cavalry, U. S. A. Capt. Leonard Wood, Assistant Surgeon, U. S. A. (Major-General, U. S. V.). Col. Robert H. Hall, 4th Infantry, U. S. A. (Brigadier-General, U. S. V.). Col. Robert P. Hughes, Inspector-General, U. S. A. (Brigadier-General, U. S. V.). Col. George M. Randall, 8th Infantry, U. S. A. (Brigadier-General, U. S. V.). Maj. William A. Kobbe, 3d Artillery, U. S. A. (Brigadier-General, U. S. V.). Brig.-Gen. Frederick D. Grant, U. S. V. Capt. J. Franklin Bell, 7th Cavalry, U. S. A. (Brigadier-General, U. S. V.). Continental army. On the morning after the affair at Lexington and Concord (April 20, 1775), the Massachusetts Committee of Safety sent a circular letter to all the towns in the province, saying: We conjure you, by all that is dear, by all that is sacred; we beg and entreat you, as you will answer it to your country, to your consciences, and, above all, to God himself, that you will hasten and arrange, by all possible means,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bell, James Franklin, 1857- (search)
Bell, James Franklin, 1857- Military officer; born in Lexington, Ky., in 1857; was graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1878; promoted to second lieutenant in the 9th Cavalry the saMcKinley directed that a congressional medal of honor should be presented to him. On Nov. 12, Colonel Bell took possession of Tarlac, where Aguinaldo had established his headquarters. The following ms. On the reorganization of the regular army in February, 1901, President McKinley appointed Colonel Bell one of the new brigadier-generals--an act that caused considerable surprise, as this officer , according to the rules of seniority, would have been entitled to precede him in promotion. General Bell is widely known in the army as a dashing cavalry officer, and when General Otis recommended t a dashing cavalry officer, and when General Otis recommended the presentation of the medal of honor, he said that it was a wonder that Colonel Bell still lived, because of his recklessness in action.