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The Daily Dispatch: October 28, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 0 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Your search returned 11 results in 6 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The surrender of Harper's Ferry. (search)
under the general command of the senior officer, Colonel Arno Voss, of the 12th Illinois. Under the inspiration and immediate direction of the two Davises, who rode together at the head of the column, the escaping force accomplished the brilliant achievement of reaching the Union lines without the loss of a man, capturing on the way a Confederate ammunition train of 97 wagons and its escort of 600 men. Graphic accounts of this daring and successful exploit have been published by Major Thomas Bell of the 8th New York, Major W. M. Luff of the 12th Illinois, and Sergeant Pettengill of the 1st Rhode Island Cavalry--all of whom were participants, and I regret that the limits of this article do not permit the recital here. There were other incidents in the history of the events under consideration highly creditable to the troops constituting the garrison of Harper's Ferry. General Kershaw's report to General McLaws of the capture of Maryland Heights, on the 13th, states that he me
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
Assistants, F. P. Seavy and Charles Metzger. Steam-tug Myrtle. Acting-Ensign, I. N. Goldsmith; Acting Master's Mate, Charles Lyon; Engineer: Acting-Second-Assistant, Thompson Guernsey. Steam-tug Dahlia. Acting-Ensign, W. H. Strope; Acting-Master's Mate, Thomas Roach; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, J. H. Everhart; Acting-Second-Assistant, John Cook. Steam-tug Hyacinth. Acting-Ensign, J. B. Hiserman; Acting-Master's Mate, James Nelis; Engineer: Acting-Second-Assistant, Thomas Bell. Steam-tug Ivy. Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, Eugene Callahan; Acting-Third-Assistant, T. H. Neely. Naval stations at Cairo and Mound City. Captain Alex. M. Pennock, Fleet-Captain and Commandant of Station; Commander Fabius Stanley, Ordnance Officer; Fleet-Paymaster, E. W. Dunn; Paymasters, W. B. Boggs and A. H. Gilman; Assistant-Fleet-Paymaster, John Reed; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. H. Harvey; Surgeon, J. W. Shively; Acting-Chief-Engineer, Wm. D. Faulkner; Acting-Ma
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union, Company B. (search)
ster. Sept. 4, 1862. Disch. May 20, 1865. Henry D. Allard, Lawrence, 28, m; shoemaker. Sept. 4, 1862. Disch. disa. Oct. 19, 1863. Edward baker, Lawrence, 45, m; dresser. Aug. 12, 1862. Died Aug. 12, 1863, Raton Rouge, La. James F. Barnes, Clinton, 27, m; blacksmith. Jan. 5, 1864. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865. Alexander Barrie, Lawrence, 21, s; weaver. Aug. 8, 1862. Disch. disa. July 2, 1863. John Bean, Lawrence, 45, m; peddler, Aug. 2, 1863. Disch disa. June 1, 1863. Thomas Bell, Lawrence, 25, s; spinner. Dec. 26, 1862. Disch. Aug. 8, 1865. Lewis R. Benton (VEAZlE), Alden, 21, s; laborer. Oct. 5, 1864. M. O. Sept, 28, 1865. Joseph Bethel, Lawrence, 40, m; spinner. Aug. 11, 1862. Disch. May 20, 1865. George F. W. Billings, Methuen, 28, m; carpenter. Aug. 11, 1862. Disch. disa. Feb. 20, 1863, Baton Rouge, La. Charles Blank,. Boston, 21, s; carpenter. April 6, 1864. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865. Robert Blumenthal, Boston, 23, s; farmer. Jan. 2, 186
1861. Its first colonel was John J. Seibels, who had commanded a battalion in the Mexican war. Its first service was at Corinth. It was soon ordered to Virginia, and during the winter of 1862 was stationed far in front of the army, at Manassas Junction. Its first serious battle was at Seven Pines, May 31 to June 1, 1862, where the regiment was greatly distinguished, losing 102 officers and men killed and wounded, including Lieut.-Col. James J. Willingham, Maj. S. Perry Nesmith, and Capts. Thomas Bell, Matthew Fox, W. C. Hunt, Augustus S. Flournoy and John B. McCarty. The Sixth served in nearly all the battles of the army of Northern Virginia, including Mechanicsville, June 26, 1862; Cold Harbor or Gaines' Mill, June 27th and 28th; Malvern Hill, July 1st to 5th; Boonsboro, September 5th; Sharpsburg, September 17th; Fredericksburg, December 13th; Chancellorsville, May 1-4, [863; The Wilderness, May 5, 6 and 7, 1864; Spottsylvania, May 8th to 18th; Winchester, July 24th, and all th
Passengers per Steamship Yorktown, Parrish, Master, from New York. Jas. M. Griffin, Geo. S. Ferriss, H. B. Ferrise, Geo. W. Ross. Thos. Bell, W. C. Gifford, John Stemmitz. Jno. Wynant, Mrs. Fisher and child, Thos. W. Lyon, A. H. Godwin, Thos. Crelin. W. A. Miller, R. S. Kellong, D. Petty, Mrs. Crowley, Mrs. Rosenburg, F. R. Surfleet, Mrs. Taggett, Mrs. Capt. Cope. Mrs. R. H. Veghte, John H. Smack, Geo. Gifford, N. Dayton, and 4 in steerage. Also, from Norfolk — Thos. Nash, Jr., R. M. Taylor, Sidney Strother, E. Bolbringer.
n, of Paducah, were brutally murdered by the commander of the Lincoln troops at that point, for no crime of their own, but simply in retaliation for the hooting of some rascal pickets near Paducah. The victims of the Lincoln Government were Mr. Thomas Bell and Capt. J. Davis. They were both shot, and our informant states, as a positive fact, that the brutal wretches who perpetrated the deed first nailed Bell to the wall, with large spikes, through the palms of his hands and his flesh. Men of their own, but simply in retaliation for the hooting of some rascal pickets near Paducah. The victims of the Lincoln Government were Mr. Thomas Bell and Capt. J. Davis. They were both shot, and our informant states, as a positive fact, that the brutal wretches who perpetrated the deed first nailed Bell to the wall, with large spikes, through the palms of his hands and his flesh. Men of Kentucky ! the blood of these martyrs cries aloud to you for vengeance ! Let it be swift and terrible !