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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 36 8 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 26 10 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 13 1 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 5, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Henry H. Bell or search for Henry H. Bell in all documents.

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R. Conway, afterward mayor; W. H. C. King, journalist; I. G. Seymour, editor of the Bulletin; Thomas Sloo, merchant; F. A. Lumsden, editor of the Picayune; W. O. Denegre, lawyer; E. T. Parker, sheriff of Orleans parish; and, to conclude with a war name, J. B. Walton, to be veteran major of the Washington Artillery when the bugle should sound for battle, and the gallant colonel of that superb battalion on fields not less hard-fought than glorious. At this meeting, with all their voices for Bell and Everett, appeared for the first time the Young Bell Ringers. These were a gallant band of marchers; young men, stepping jauntily and jesting while they stepped; evidently musically inclined, since in their bands, with a pleasantly conceived jeu d'esprit on their principal candidate's name, each bore and zealously rang a bell, great or small, with note sharp or mellow, as the need was. The Young Bell Ringers presented the picturesque element in the presidential campaign of 1860. Opposed
r Moore made haste to recommend provision for the election of members of the convention as soon as may be passed with due regard to time, to whom shall be communicated the responsibility of determining that position and shaping that policy, so far as affects the relations of Louisiana to the Federal government. Before the legislature met there had come, filtering through, the totals of the Louisiana election. A mere mention suffices here. Breckinridge and Lane had received 22,681 votes; Bell and Everett 20,204; Douglas and Johnson 7,625; Lincoln and Hamlin were voteless. Like Gallio, the supporters of the different candidates now cared for none of these things. The Lincoln election had wiped out, as by an all-spreading sponge, any solicitude for the votes in the various States of the South. With the meeting of the legislature the adjutantgen-eral of the State submitted his report. He looked at the matter gloomily, holding that the sum absolutely needed to organize and arm t
ve Mayor Monroe showed coolness, along with the dignity worthy of the chief magistrate of a city threatened. To Commander Henry H. Bell, the bearer of the letter, Mayor Monroe remarked: As I consider this a threat to bombard the city, and as this ihe street in front of those shining bayonets, the crowd, always silent and angry, waited for what was to come. Upon Captain Bell, Farragut's chief-of-staff, fell the burden of hoisting the flag. To his notification the mayor, strongly moved, repledly renegade as would be willing to exchange places with you. Upon receiving, well or ill, these words of the mayor, Captain Bell, accompanied by Lieutenant Kautz, proceeded to the roof. The crowd below, sullen and indignant, looked up from Lafayly in front of the howitzer pointing down St. Charles street. Here he continued, unmoving, until Lieutenant Kautz and Captain Bell had reappeared. The sailors, at a word from their officers, drew their howitzers back into the square; after them m
Atlanta, and Ezra Church, July 20th to 28th. During these operations Gibson's brigade was in the division commanded by General Clayton, Stewart having corps command until S. D. Lee arrived, July 27th. Gibson's brigade took part in the attack from the intrenchments on the 22d; and on the 28th, according to General Gibson's report, was led by Colonel Von Zinken against the enemy strongly posted, where the men fought gallantly and lost heavily. Lieut.-Col. Thomas Shields and Maj. Charles J Bell, of the Thirtieth, fell at the head of the regiment, the former with the colors in his hands within a few feet of the enemy's breastworks. Lieut. W. B. Chippendale, of the same gallant regiment, was killed and Captain Becnel mortally wounded. Lieut. W. J. Clark, Nineteenth, and Lieut. W. G. Jeter, Fourth, and Capt. W. H. Sparks, First, were killed, and Lieutenant Gladden mortally wounded. The brigade took position, intrenching on the west of the city, and was engaged in continual skirmish