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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 60 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 36 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 26 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 26 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 24 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 11, 1861., [Electronic resource] 23 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 17 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 3, 1860., [Electronic resource] 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John Bell or search for John Bell in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 5 document sections:

d, leaving the abolitionists of New England and the disunionists of the South to the harmless pastime of belching fire and fury at each other at a safe distance, protected by the patriotism and good sense of nine-tenths of their countrymen, against the evils they would bring on themselves. Can you doubt the success of such a reunion? Not an advocate of disunion, under any probable circumstances, can be found among the candidates for the presidency and vice-presidency. The supporters of Bell to a man, the supporters of Douglas to a man, and more than three-fourths of the supporters of Breckinridge, are staunch friends of the Union, and staunch adversaries of northern interference with southern institutions, When, convinced of the folly and madness of their warfare on each other, as they will be after the election, if not before, they band together in common cause, and that cause the preservation of our glorious Union and its invaluable Constitution, with their attendant blessings
subject in reference to my position. Mr. Breckinridge's friends presented him to the people as the Union candidate. I was one of Mr. Breckinridge's friends. The Bell men presented the claims of the Hon. John Bell of Tennessee for the Presidency, upon the ground that he was the best Union candidate. The Republican party, so farthe Hon. John Bell of Tennessee for the Presidency, upon the ground that he was the best Union candidate. The Republican party, so far as I understand them, have always :been in favor of the Union. Then here was the contest; between four candidates presented to the consideration of the people of the United States. And the great struggle between them and their advocates was, who was entitled to pre-eminence as a man in favor of the preservation of the Union of hem, to bring about the same result. Then what was the former contest? Bringing it down to the present times, there has been no disagreement between Republicans, Bell men, Douglas men, and Breckinridge men, as regards the preservation of the Union of States. Now, however, these measures are all laid aside — all these party qu
alse issue before the country. It implies that the Federal Government has committed some great wrong which ought to be remedied, before peace can be restored; when in fact the leaders in the South have controlled the legislation of the country for years, and the laws now in existence were made, or suggested, by themselves, when in power. The position of Virglnia is a peculiar one at this moment. Last November, at the Presidential election, it gave upwards of sixteen thousand majority for Bell and Douglas, both Union candidates for the presidency. Their principal competitor was loudly proclaimed as also true to the Union; and throughout the canvass, any imputation of favoring disunion was indignantly denied by the advocates of all the candidates. At the election for members of the Convention in February last, there was a majority of over sixty thousand votes given to the Union candidates; and the people, by an equal majority, determined that no act of that Convention should chang
be maintained. We have seen that so far the experiment has succeded well; and now we should make an effort, in this last ordeal through which we are passing, to crush out the fatal doctrine of Secession and those who are cooperating with it in the shape of rebels and traitors. I advocated the professions of a distinguished son of Kentucky at the late election, for the reason that I believed he was a better Union man than any other candidate in the field. Others advocated the claims of Mr. Bell, believing him to be a better Union man; others those of Mr. Douglas. In the South we know that there was no Republican ticket. I was a Union man then; I was a Union man in 1833; I am a Union man now. And what has transpired since the election in November last that has produced sufficient cause to break up this Government? The Senator from California enumerated the facts up to the 25th day of May, 1860, when there was a vote taken in this body for the protection of slave property in the
. That the Journal, Democrat, Anzeiger, Courier, and all the peace papers in the State are requested to publish the proceedings and resolutions of this meeting. The following gentlemen were appointed an Executive Committee: Wm. P. Campbell, Wm. Terry, J. S. Lithgow, Jas. Bridgeford, John Bell, Wm. Inman, B. H. Hornsby, A. A. Gordon, D. Spalding, Jr., D. B. Leight, Emanuel Lieberman, and E. S. Worthington. On motion, the meeting adjourned. James Trabue, President. John Bell, Secretary. 8. That the Journal, Democrat, Anzeiger, Courier, and all the peace papers in the State are requested to publish the proceedings and resolutions of this meeting. The following gentlemen were appointed an Executive Committee: Wm. P. Campbell, Wm. Terry, J. S. Lithgow, Jas. Bridgeford, John Bell, Wm. Inman, B. H. Hornsby, A. A. Gordon, D. Spalding, Jr., D. B. Leight, Emanuel Lieberman, and E. S. Worthington. On motion, the meeting adjourned. James Trabue, President. John Bell, Secretary.