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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 60 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 36 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 26 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 26 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 24 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 11, 1861., [Electronic resource] 23 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 17 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 3, 1860., [Electronic resource] 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for John Bell or search for John Bell in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 8: (search)
but as we were Americans we had a kind of national privilege to have a private audience at a time when it is not commonly given, and no one went with us except Prof. Bell of Edinburgh, the famous anatomist. There was very little ceremony or parade about it, and in all respects it pleased me extremely. On entering, we knelt and old, but he received us standing, and was dressed with characteristic simplicity and humility as a friar, without the slightest ornament to distinguish his rank. Bell spoke no Italian, and therefore the conversation was chiefly with us, and, as we were Americans, entirely on America. The Pope talked a good deal about our univerto her societies which none others in Rome have. Besides these, I used to go to Sir Thomas Trowbridge's; sometimes to Mrs. Drew's, sister of Lady Mackintosh; to John Bell's, the famous surgeon; etc., etc. I have reserved the Bonapartes to the last, because I really do not know where to class them; for they belong, now at least
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 12: (search)
y the by, are in general more cultivated than the clergy at Madrid; and several families, both foreigners and Portuguese. Among the last was Mr. Stephens, an old English gentleman, at whose table I always had a plate, and where I met generally John Bell, Mr. Musgrave, and two or three other men of letters, and M. Lesseps, the French charged d'affaires, an uncommonly interesting man from his knowledge and vivacity, and remarkable as the only individual who escaped from La Peyrouse's last fatal ll Protestants are now buried there. I saw a few names that I knew, among others those of Mrs. Humpbrey's father and mother, and that of Dr. Doddridge; but I sought in vain for Fielding's, who died here in 1754, and the tradition of whose grave is preserved only by Mr. Bell, and two or three other Englishmen in Lisbon, who take an interest in letters. The preceding thirty-five pages consist of Journal made up from notebooks, at his first leisure after the dates, as was his wont. See p. 86.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
life, he would have been, I shall be satisfied . . . . Now and then I get a new book from England or from the Continent; but the embarrassments of the world and the troubles about money—which Lafontaine thought was chose peu necessaire—have been felt even in the marts of literature. There were never so few books printed in one season, within the memory of man, as the last, both at London and Paris. The Subaltern, written by Rev. Mr. Gleig, is a curious book, worth your reading; so is John Bell's fragment about Italy; but Head's Rough Sketches Rough Notes made during Journeys across the Pampas, etc., by Captain [afterwards Sir] Francis B. Head. is really one of the most spirited affairs I have looked into for a great while. . . . . Mr. Livingston sent me the two folios of his Code, and Chancellor Kent sent me his Commentaries, or I suppose I should not have ventured into them; but being obliged to do enough to make appropriate acknowledgments, I read the whole, and was much i
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
.), 177. Beaumont, Gustave de, 421. Beauvillers, M., 122. Beck, Dr., Professor at Harvard College, 351, 352. Beck, Professor, 108. Beckford, William, 246 and note. Bedford, Sixth Duke of, 268-270. Belem Church and Convent, 244. Bell, J., 248, 249. Bell, John, 173, 174, 180. Bell, Joseph, 7. Benci, 174. Benecke, Professor, 70, 76, 79, 82. Berchet, Giovanni, 450. Berg, President von, 122. Berlin, visits, 109, 493-503. Bernard, General, 350. Bertrand, Favre, 153, 155Bell, John, 173, 174, 180. Bell, Joseph, 7. Benci, 174. Benecke, Professor, 70, 76, 79, 82. Berchet, Giovanni, 450. Berg, President von, 122. Berlin, visits, 109, 493-503. Bernard, General, 350. Bertrand, Favre, 153, 155. Bigelow, Dr., Jacob, 12, 316 note, 319. Bigelow, Timothy, 13. Blake, George, 20. Bligh, President, 372. Blumenbach, Madame, 103. Blumenbach, Professor, 70, 71, 80, 85, 94, 103-105, 121. Blumner, Madame de, 481. Bohl von Faber, 236 and note. Bologna, visits, 166. Bombelles, Count H., 246, 247. Bonaparte, Christine (Countess Posse), 182, 183 note, 446 Bonaparte, Emperor Napoleon I., return from Elba, 49; Dr. Parr on, 50; Byron's feeling for, 60; anecdotes of, 61, 123. Bon