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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Madison Bell or search for Madison Bell in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
strong sentiment against disunion. The vote for presidential candidates in Georgia is a fair criterion of the sentiment in the State prior to the election of Mr. Lincoln. There were three electoral tickets: One for Breckinridge and Lane, one for Bell and Everett, one for Douglas and Johnson, but none for Lincoln and Hamlin. The vote stood as follows: Breckinridge and Lane, 51,893; Bell and Everett, 42,855; Douglas and Johnson, 11,580. As the Breckinridge ticket was favored by the most pronouBell and Everett, 42,855; Douglas and Johnson, 11,580. As the Breckinridge ticket was favored by the most pronounced Southern rights men, the vote in Georgia showed a small majority against immediate secession by separate State action. But the election of Mr. Lincoln by a purely sectional vote set the current toward secession, causing the tide of disunion sentiment to rise with steadily increasing volume, and strengthening the views and fears of those who could see relief only by withdrawing from a union which had fallen under the control of a party favoring a policy so antagonistic to the rights and in
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
s, which ended with the capitulation of General Johnston. The Eleventh Georgia cavalry regiment had as officers: Col. A. Young, Lieut.-Col. H. W. Barclay, Maj. Madison Bell; Capts. (A) M. Bell, (B) E. P. Bedell, (C) J. Reid, (D) D. M. West and J. M. Crawford, (E) J. Kelly, (F) W. C. Price, (G) D. M. West, (H) W. S. Erwin, (I) J.M. Bell, (B) E. P. Bedell, (C) J. Reid, (D) D. M. West and J. M. Crawford, (E) J. Kelly, (F) W. C. Price, (G) D. M. West, (H) W. S. Erwin, (I) J. N. Dorsey, (K) N. T. Taber. This regiment was formed in the fall of 1864 from the Thirtieth battalion of cavalry, which had been serving in Virginia, by adding four new companies. It was with Gen. Wade Hampton in the campaign of the Carolinas, in the spring of 1865, and surrendered with the rest of the army near Goldsboro, Aprilk part in the defense of Savannah in December, 1864. The Thirtieth battalion Georgia cavalry, Lieut.-Col. A. Young, was composed of the companies of Capts. (A) M. Bell, (B) E. P. Bedell, (C) J. Reid, (D) D. M. West and J. M. Crawford, (E) J. Kelly, (F).W. C. Price, (H) W. S. Erwin, (I) J. N. Dorsey, (K) N. T. Taber. This batta