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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 28 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 14 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 6 2 Browse Search
John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life 4 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life. You can also browse the collection for Henry W. Benham or search for Henry W. Benham in all documents.

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John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life, XX.
Army road
and bridge Builders. (search)
end and one in the centre. It was the longest bridge built in the war, of which I have any knowledge, save one, and that the bridge built across the James, below Wilcox's Landing, in 1864. This latter was a remarkable achievement in ponton engineering. It was over two thousand feet long, and the channel boats were firmly anchored in thirteen fathoms of water. The engineers began it during the forenoon of June 14, and completed the task at midnight. It was built under the direction of General Benham for the passage of the wagontrains and a part of the troops, while the rest crossed in steamers and ferry-boats. But ponton bridges were not always laid without opposition or interference from the enemy. Perhaps they made the most stubborn contest to prevent the laying of the bridges across the Rappahannock before Fredericksburg in December, 1862. The pontoniers had partially laid one bridge before daylight, but when dawn appeared the enemy's sharpshooters, who had been posted i
Alexander, E. Porter, 406-7 Alexandria, Va., 48,121,331 Allatoona, Ga., 400-401 Ambulances, 302-15 Anderson, Robert, 22 Andrew, John A., 23, 25 Antietam, 71,176,253, 286,287, 378 Ashby, Mass., 274 Atkinson, D. Webster, 392 Atlanta, 400,403,405 Avery House, 402 Baltimore, 116 Banks, Nathaniel P., 23, 71 Beale, James, The Battle Flags of the Army of the Potomac at Gettysburg, 338-39 Beats, 94-102, 174,312 Bell, John, 16 Belle Plain, Va., 369 Benham, Henry W., 391 Big Shanty, Ga., 404 Birney, David B., 157,255-56,261, 345,353 Blair, Francis P., 264, 383 Borden's Milk, 125 Boston, 25,29-30,51, 199,226 Bounty-jumpers, 161-62,202 Bowditch, Henry I., 315 Boxford, Mass., 44 Boydton Plank Road, 313 Bragg, Braxton, 262 Brandy Station, Va., 113, 180,229, 352-53 Bristoe Station, Va., 367 Brown, Joseph W., 403 Buchanan, James, 18-19,395 Buell, Don Carlos, 405 Bugle calls, 165-66, 168-69, 172, 176-78,180-97,336-3