Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Judah P. Benjamin or search for Judah P. Benjamin in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Remarkable record of the Haskells of South Carolina. (search)
this true old cavalier. It was Barnard E. Bee who christened Stonewall on Manassas field, just before his brave spirit went upward in the arms of the white-winged angels of glory. And Wade Hampton, wounded at Bull Run, and again severely on the retreat from Gettysburg, he was the same high-natured patriot in war and peace. One battle sadly proved the mettle of that race. Both of the general's boys were in his legion. Wade, his first-born, and handsome, sunny-hearted Preston, his very Benjamin. The latter rushed recklessly into the hottest of the charge, far in advance of the line. The father called to Wade: Bring the boy back! The elder brother spurred to the front, saw the other reel in the saddle and caught him as he fell, mortally wounded. At the moment a bullet tore through his shoulder and the father rode up to find one son dead and his bleeding brother supporting him. The general took the body tenderly in his arms, kissed the white face, and handed it to Tom Taylor.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.53 (search)
not yielded his life at Chancellorsville, if— But there is one sordid consideration which is little thought of,—if the South had had the money! Colonel James G. Gibbes, of this city, the present Surveyor-General, recalls an interesting fact bearing on this if. In 1862 he was sent out by the Treasury Department of the Confederacy to negotiate the famous cotton bonds. Mr. C. G. Memminger, of this State, was Secretary of the Treasury, but Colonel Gibbes was sent at the advice of Mr. Judah P. Benjamin, Attorney-General, who had, while an attorney in New Orleans, been a legal adviser of Colonel Gibbes. The latter ran the blockade out of Charleston the first week in November (parenthetically, Colonel Gibbes remarked that blockade running was far from an impossibility. John Frazier & Co. were famous blockade runners, and made 60 trips before a single vessel was attacked. However, pilots were paid fabulous prices, and a captain received $5,000 in gold for each trip). Arrived a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Warren Blues—Extra Billy's men: Roll of officers and men of a famous band of Veterans. (search)
, sharpshooter, captured at Fort Steadman (living). Bolen, Newton, private, wounded (living). Bolen, Franklin H., sergeant, wounded and captured. Beatty, W. A., private, captured. Brown, Henry J., private, wounded (living). Brown, Benjamin, private, wounded at Seven Pines (dead). Burner, James, private, wounded at Seven Pines (dead). Blackwood, Robert, nurse in hospital and died on duty. Cornwell, Alpheus, private, wounded at Seven Pines (dead). Cornwell, Inmann, privaastello, captured. Owens, Crede, captured. Powell, William, captured at Fort Steadman. Shelton, Austin. Shackleford, John. Snead, N. S. Shifflett, George M., surrendered at Appomattox. Tillman, Overton, captured. Woodson, Benjamin, wounded at Hatcher's Run. Wood, Ira G., wounded at Hatcher's Run. Wood, John W., wounded at Hatcher's Run. Walton, Rice, wounded at Hatcher's Run. Ward, Samuel, wounded at Hatcher's Run. Lieutenant John G. Brown and Sergeant Will
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of Company E, Nineteenth Virginia Infantry. (search)
1863. Goss, William Walker, second lieutenant; promoted first lieutenant in the fall of 1862; promoted captain early in 1863; mortally wounded in the battle of Gettysburg, July 3, 1863; died there in field hospital, July 18, 1863. Thurman, Benjamin W., third lieutenant; not re-elected at the reorganization. Taylor, Albert G., first sergeant; accidentally shot at Manassas, June 10, 1861, and died twelve hours afterwards: Foster, Anthony, second sergeant; discharged by conscript act oleg amputated; honorably discharged October 7, 1864, for this cause. Garnett, William J., wounded in right arm, at Gaines' Mill, June 27, 1862. Garnett, Milton, transferred to 39th Battalion Virginia Cavalry, December 19, 1864. Gregory, Benjamin F., enlisted March 15, 1862. Goss, John W., transferred Company K, 2nd Regiment, Virginia Cavalry, and from there to 39th Battalion, Virginia Cavalry. Gore, James, discharged 1862, by conscript act, over thirty-five years of age. Goss,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Hanover Grays. (search)
aw, Edwin (dead). Haw, John H. (sergeant). Haw, Richardson W. (twice wounded; dead). Haw, William (wounded). Hazelgrove, Andrew (died in prison). Hogan, William (dead). Home, Robert R. (died in prison). Home, Ralph R. Hott, William (wounded). Hughes, P. H. (wounded; dead). Johnson, P. L. Jones, Washington (killed). Jones, William Wingfield (wounded and dead) Kelley, James S. (dead). Kent, George W. (wounded). Lipscomb, Henry (wounded). Lorgan, Benjamin (dead). Mantlo, William (twice wounded). Mantlo, Cornelius (wounded). Mills, John T. (detailed; dead). Mosby, John S. (dead). Norment, William E. (dead). Nunnally, L. M. (dead). Otey, Thomas (wounded). Otey, William (wounded and dead). Pate, John W. (transferred and dead). Pate, William B. (dead). Richardson, Bowling (dead). Richardson, John (wounded). Richardson, Henry (dead). Richardson, Peter (dead). Short, William Neander. Smith, William