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hot in several places. Capt. Coles, company I, Forty-sixth Virginia, shot in the breast. Lieut. William R. Selden, C. S. A., shot in head. Lieut. Neill T. Monroe, company E, Eighth North-Carolina, shot in breast. James D. Horn, Eighth North-Carolina. Corporal Lane,do. do.  R. W. Cameron,do. do.  Thomas P. Mulleneaux, Second North-Carolina. Johnston Williams,do. do. Sergeant John H. Talley,do. do. S. J. Claiborne,do. do. Alfred B. Scott,do. do. John S. Turpin,do. do. William Bennett, Forty-sixth Virginia. William Wilson, North-Carolina State Guards. Charles Bailey,do. do. Total killed,  16 Wounded. Fifty-Ninth Virginia.--Lieut. Walker, slight, in the leg; George Collin, severe, in elbow; Thos. Robbins, company B, severe, in knee; William David, severe, in thigh and abdomen; John Ray, flesh wound, in hand; Lieut. Edgar Miller, slight, in shoulder; John Lawson, in arm; James A. Snell, in arm; Dennis Cussick, finger shot off; John Smith, severe, left e
l strength would enable him to perform. Upon moving out from camp, the following field, staff and line-officers were in their respective proper positions; Colonel C. C. Dodge, Lieut.-Colonel B. F. Onderdonk, Majors Wheelan and Schiefflin, Surgeon Bennett, Assistant Surgeon Wright, Adjutant M. A. Downing; Captains Terwilliger, Poor, Gregory, Sanger, Masston, Ellis, and Dean; Lieutenants Harman, Penny, Freeborn, Adams, Disosway, Varick, Simmonds, Wheelan, Warren, Ball, Wright, Ergelke and Cronmplished, Col. Dodge reluctantly gave the order to recross the river at Joiner's Ford, moving over just before dark to a position a mile or two beyond, where men and horses were allowed a few hours' rest, which they much needed. Our surgeons, Bennett and Wright, were exceedingly attentive to their duties, and were accompanied by the gallant and accomplished first assistant surgeon of the One Hundred and Twelfth New-York regiment of infantry, Dr. Boyd, of Chautauque County, a volunteer on the
eneral along both lines. The Ninth Kentucky rebel infantry, Captain T. J. Morehead, commanding, fought against the One Hundred and Fourth Illinois, the Second Kentucky against the One Hundred and Sixth Ohio, while a cloud of Duke's, Gano's, and Bennett's cavalry, mounted and dismounted, assailed the One Hundred and Eighth Ohio, and enveloped our extreme left wing. The piece of artillery brought into action did excellent service, and at the second fire one of the enemy's caissons was explodertillery. The cavalry was mostly made up of Tennessee and Kentucky men, with the exception of three companies of Texan Rangers under the command of Col. Gano. The three cavalry regiments were commanded respectively by Cols. Duke, Chenault, and Bennett, and the other battalion by Major Stoner. The two infantry regiments were commanded by the infamous Kentucky traitor, Roger W. Hanson, and the artillery was partly attached to his brigade, partly to the cavalry, and partly independent. The ent
another instance of equal daring. The forces engaged in the affair on our side were the Ninth and Second Kentucky infantry, commanded by Col. Thomas H. Hunt, numbering six hundred and eighty men, and the cavalry regiments of Chenault, Cluke, Bennett, and Huffman, with Cobb's Kentucky battery. All told, our forces were about one thousand three hundred. The enemy was the Thirty-ninth brigade of Dumont's division, composed of three regiments, one battalion, a squadron of cavalry, and sectionsave at Shiloh. David Watts, a private of this battery, who was killed, was an intelligent and promising young man, the son of the well-known merchant of Paducah. The town of Hartsville and some four hundred of the enemy were captured by Colonel Bennett's command. To John Blazer, of company C, Ninth Kentucky regiment, belongs the honor of capturing the battery flag of the enemy. It is a beautiful piece of silk bunting, with the letter B upon it. The Ninth regiment also had the flag o
should reenforcements be required on either side. I also telegraphed Gen. Boyle all the information of importance and asked him for additional ammunition for infantry, and sponges, rammers, sights, elevating screws, etc., for the siege-guns. On the twenty-fourth, I had taken all pains to learn the real strength of the enemy, which I found variously estimated at from three thousand to four thousand five hundred, commanded by Major-Gen. Morgan, the regiments by Duke, Gano, Cluke, Chenault, Bennett, Stoner, and Breckinridge, with White's battery of eight guns, the largest a twelve-pounder. White's name is supposed to be Robinson, formerly of Kentucky. At five o'clock A. M., December twenty-fifth, I again ordered the Twelfth Kentucky cavalry, Col. Shanks, to Cave City and beyond to Bear Wallow, with the first and second battalions; the third, under Major Stout, being ordered on the Greensburgh road to Burnt Bridge Ford, north of (Green River, and two companies each, Fourth and Fift
nsley, Matthew Armone, David Briston, Fred. W. Becker, Nathaniel Chapman, Samuel Caldwell, Joseph Chapman, John G. Hertle, Chas. B. Horse, Joseph Hill, George Johnston, Jefferson Lincoln, Arthur Mitchell, James McKown, Alonzo R. Palmer, Charles Wilson. Third infantry, company K.--Killed: Privates John E. Barker, Samuel W. Thomas. Seriously wounded: Sergeant A. J. Austin, E. C. Hoyt; privates John Hensley, Thos. B. Walker. Frozen feet: Sergeants C. J. Herron, C. F. Williams; Corporals Wm. Bennett, John Lattman, John Wingate; privates Joseph German, James Urquhart, Wm. S. John, Algeray Ramsdell, James Epperson, A. J. F. Randell, William Farnham, John Baurland, Giles Ficknor, Alfred Peusho, B. B. Bigelow, J. Anderson, F. Bouralso, F. Brouch, A. L. Bailey, William Charleton, D. Donahue, C. H. Godbold, J. Heywood, C. Heath, J. Manning, Wm. Way. recapitulation. Co.Regiment.Killed.Wounded.Feet frozen.Total. A,Second cavalry,25714 H,Second cavalry,2111629 K,Second cavalry,
st a more formidable attack. As soon as the retiring enemy had regained the main body, the attack was renewed with redoubled fierceness, but, meeting with such continued and well-directed volleys from us, he fell back under cover of the houses again. I then continued to fight the enemy, who was concealed behind logs, fences, and houses, and some perched upon the tree-tops, until my ammunition was beginning to run out, and many of the guns became unfit for use, when I was relieved by Colonel Bennett, of the Sixty-ninth Indiana, and ordered to retire. I then fell back to the second ravine in the rear of me, replenishing the empty cartridge-boxes with ammunition from the boxes of their comrades who were killed and wounded. I remained in that position until late in the afternoon. I saw the charge made on the left, when I quickly formed my regiment, marching it toward the charging column, in order to support them, if necessary, but before reaching them the enemy fled in confusion.
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
r; in 1863, John F. Woodward, Andrew Gleason, M. C. Wheeler; in 1864, John F. Woodward, Lyman Greenwood, M. C. Wheeler; in 1865, H. Underwood, A. Gleason, M. C. Wheeler. The town-clerk during the years 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865 was William Bennett. The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was Benj. D. Phelps; in 1863 and 1864, William Bennett; in 1865, Moses Greenwood. 1861. May 1st, A town-meeting was held to take measures to raise a military company for active service, and to provideWilliam Bennett; in 1865, Moses Greenwood. 1861. May 1st, A town-meeting was held to take measures to raise a military company for active service, and to provide for the comfort of the families of those who should enlist. A committee of five was appointed to raise money by private subscription, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow not exceeding three thousand dollars for these purposes. Each recruit was to receive one dollar a day for ten days while engaged in drilling, and his wife and family one dollar a day for three months while in active service. The company was never completed. 1862. July 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred
The Daily Dispatch: December 16, 1861., [Electronic resource], Ex-Governor Stewart knocked down and his hands tied behind him. (search)
Death of prominent Unionists in St. Louis. --Phocian K. McCreery, of the firm of Crow, McCreery & Co.; Benj. F. Crane, the well known jeweller; and William Bennett, of the firm of Russell & Bennett, died on Sunday, the 8th inst. Death of prominent Unionists in St. Louis. --Phocian K. McCreery, of the firm of Crow, McCreery & Co.; Benj. F. Crane, the well known jeweller; and William Bennett, of the firm of Russell & Bennett, died on Sunday, the 8th inst.
Capt. O. Jennings Wise, 46th Va.; shot in several places. Capt. Coles, Company I, 46th Va.; shot in breast. Lieut. William B. Selden, C. S. A.; shot in head. Lieut. Neill T. Monroe, Company E, 8th N. C.; shot in breast, James D. Horn, 8th N. C. Corporal Lane, 8th N. C. R. W. Cameron, 8th N. C. Thos. P. Mulleneaux, 2d N. C. Johnston Williams, 2d N. C. Serg't John H. Talley, 2d N. C. S. J. Claiborne, 2d N. C. Alfred B. Scott, 2d N. C. John S. Turpin, 2d N. C. Wm. Bennett, 46th Va. Wm. Wilson, N. C. State Guards. Chas Bailey, N. C. State Guards. Total killed....16 Wounded. Fifty-ninth Virginia.--Lt. Walker, slight, in the leg; Geo. Collin, severe, in elbow; Thos. Robbins, Co. B, severe, in knee; William David, severe, in thigh and abdomen; John Ray, flesh wound, in hand; Lt. Edgar Miller, slight, in shoulder; John Lawson, in arm; Jas. A. Snell, in arm; Dennis Cussick, finger shot off; John smith, severe, left eye; Wm. E. Quigley, in head;
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