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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley. You can also browse the collection for Gordon Bennett or search for Gordon Bennett in all documents.

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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.15 (search)
e; and in two cases, especially the Chicago Republican, most handsomely. I then came over to New York, and the Tribune and Times likewise paid me well. John Russell Young, the Editor of the New York Tribune, was pleased to be very complimentary, and said he was sorry he knew of nothing else in which he could avail himself of the services of such an indefatigable correspondent. Bowing my thanks, I left the Tribune, and proceeded to the Herald office; by a spasm of courage, I asked for Mr. Bennett. By good luck, my card attracted his attention, and I was invited to his presence. I found myself before a tall, fierce-eyed, and imperious-looking young man, who said, Oh, you are the correspondent who has been following Hancock and Sherman lately. Well, I must say your letters and telegrams have kept us very well informed. I wish I could offer you something permanent, for we want active men like you. You are very kind to say so, and I am emboldened to ask you if I could not offe
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.16 (search)
derstand Caesar's saying to the sailors, Nay, be not afraid, for you carry Caesar and his fortunes! I could say the same: My body carries Stanley and his fortunes. With God's help, I shall succeed! A telegram called him to Paris, to meet Mr. Bennett in person; and there, October 16, 1869, he received a commission of startling proportions. He was to search for Livingstone in earnest,--not for an interview, but to discover, and, if necessary, extricate him, wherever he might be in the hearis the use of a sailing-boat in the tropics? My back aches with pain, my mind becomes old, and all because of these dispiriting calms. December 31st, 1870. Eighty days from Bombay, and Zanzibar, at last! But to find what? No letters from Bennett, nor his agent; so, of course, no money. No news of Livingstone since his departure, years before; and of him, then, this cheerful gossip:-- ----gave me a very bad opinion of Livingstone; he says that he is hard to get along with, is cross
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.17 (search)
rations, to show from his private Journal something of the workings of his own heart and mind, in the solitude of Africa. Though fifteen months had elapsed since I had received my commission, no news of Livingstone had been heard by any mortal at Zanzibar. According to one, he was dead; and, according to another, he was lost; while still another hazarded the conviction that he had attached himself to an African princess, and had, in fact, settled down. There was no letter for me from Mr. Bennett, confirming his verbal order to go and search for the traveller; and no one at Zanzibar was prepared to advance thousands of dollars to one whom nobody knew; in my pocket I had about eighty dollars in gold left, after my fifteen months journey! Many people since have professed to disbelieve that I discovered the lost traveller in Africa! Had they known the circumstances of my arrival at Zanzibar, they would have had greater reason for their unbelief than they had. To me it looked for
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.19 (search)
t I will endeavour to be even with my word, must be accepted by you as sufficient. Well, well! I will cable over to Bennett of the New York Herald, and ask if he is willing to join in this expedition of yours. Deep under the Atlantic, the question was flashed. Gordon Bennett tore open the telegram in New York City, and, after a moment's thought, snatched a blank form and wrote, Yes! Bennett. This was the answer put into my hand the same day at 135, Fleet Street. You may imagine my Bennett. This was the answer put into my hand the same day at 135, Fleet Street. You may imagine my feelings, as I read the simple monosyllable which was my commission: bales, packages, boxes, trunks, bills, letters, flowing in a continuous stream; the writing, telegraphing, and nervous hurry and flurry of each day's work, until we sailed! Followan escort. With these we travelled west from the north-west comer of Lake Victoria and discovered the giant mountain Gordon Bennett, in the country of Gambaragara, and halted near Lake Muta-Nzige. But as the Wanyoro gathered in such numbers as to m
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.23 (search)
lassic names like those should be displaced by modern names, and-- I humbly beg your pardon, Mr. Gladstone, but Crophi and Mophi, if they ever existed at all, were situated over a thousand miles to the northward. Herodotus simply wrote from hearsay, and-- Oh, I can't stand that. Well, Mr. Gladstone, said I, will you assist me in this project of a railway to Uganda, for the suppression of the slave-trade, if I can arrange that Crophi and Mophi shall be substituted in place of Gordon Bennett and Mackinnon? Oh, that will not do; that is flat bribery and corruption ; and, smiling, he rose to his feet, buttoning his coat lest his virtue might yield to the temptation. Alas! said I to myself, when England is ruled by old men and children! My slave-trade discourse must be deferred, I see. Turning now to the extraordinary charges made against me, on my return to Europe, that I deliberately employed slaves on my expedition, I would point out that every traveller, before