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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Helen Eliza Benson or search for Helen Eliza Benson in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 2: Boyhood.—1805-1818. (search)
s just entering his teens, and to understand the love and reverence in which he ever held the memory of his parent. I always feel like a little boy when I think of Mother, he used to say in after years; and he never doubted that he had her strengthening and inspiring influence, and her constant approbation, through all his stormy career. Many years after her death he thus wrote of her to his betrothed: You speak of a mother's love, and ask, What love is Ms. June 21, 1834, to Helen E. Benson. comparable to hers? An allusion like this dissolves my heart, and causes it to grow liquid as water. I had a mother once, who cared for me with such a passionate regard, who loved me so intensely, that no language can describe the yearnings of her soul—no instrument measure the circumference of her maternal spirit. As to her person, I sum up my panegyric of it in the following original verse: She was the masterpiece of womankind— In shape and height majestically fine; Her cheeks the
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 12: American Anti-slavery Society.—1833. (search)
ce more—but more particularly under the hospitable roof of your father. I confess, in addition to the other delightful attractions which are there found, the soft blue eyes and pleasant countenance of Miss Ellen are by no means impotent Helen Eliza Benson. or unattractive. But this is episodical. The Young Men's Anti-Slavery Association of Boston are driving ahead with even a better spirit than that of ‘76. They have now upwards of 90 members! Their example cannot be lost. I trust o be less than eight. It was in fact six, viz.: Mr. Garrison, Joshua Coffin, Amos A. Phelps, James G. Barbadoes, Nathaniel Southard, and Arnold Buffum. Whether we shall get any from the State of Maine is uncertain. . . . At the City Hotel Mr. Benson found not only his Atlantic Monthly, Feb., 1874, p. 166. correspondent but the Quaker poet, for Whittier (thanks to the generosity of S. E. Sewall) had been enabled to join his old friend in Boston. These three, with John Prentice and what
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?—George Thompson.—1834. Garrison marries Helen Eliza Benson, of Brooklyn, Conn., after the Liberator has been barely saved from going under. In the same month, September, George Thompson arrives from England, come at Garrison's request to aid the anti-slavery agitation in this country. Foreign interference is resented, and he is mobbed in sundry parts of New England. Freedom's Cottage, Roxbury, is the superscription of a letter addressedpportunity to visit the Bensons at Brooklyn, and every interview confirmed him in his admiration of her. She was a plump and rosy creature, with blue eyes and fair brown hair, just entering, when first seen by him, her twenty-third year. Helen Eliza Benson was born in Providence, R. I., February 23, 1811. The family removed to Brooklyn, Conn., in 1824. Peace and Plenty, they sometimes called her, not more in allusion to her uniformly placid disposition than to her easily aroused and irrepre<