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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
n of associations. Plain Speaker, 1.23. Chace had, however, a partner in Ms. Aug. 15, 1841, G. W. Benson to W. L. G. husbandry, Christopher A. Greene, with whom he lived in a sort of community; and s, one of which, yet in the bud, would approach him from the side of his brother-in-law. George W. Benson, early in 1841, having disposed of the family property in Brooklyn, Conn.: Where do you sete a tomahawk sort of Cf. ante, p. 5. man myself. On the other hand, Abby Kelley, writing to G. W. Benson, censures Charles Burleigh for not Ms. Sept. 13, 1841. wanting S. S. Foster sent to lecture en his house had for a week been turned into a hospital. Its Ms. Dec. 17, 1841, W. L. G. to G. W. Benson. formal tone was a menace: Isaac Knapp to W. L. Garrison. Boston, Dec. 8, 1841.Ms. etter of transmission, Mr. Garrison wrote thus to his brother-in-law: W. L. Garrison to G. W. Benson, at Northampton, Mass. Cambridgeport, Dec. 17, 1841. Ms. You will see, by the accompan
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
Lib. 12.31. This conviction had now complete possession of him. W. L. Garrison to G. W. Benson at Northampton, Mass. Boston, March 22, 1842. Ms. If all be well (and, so mutable are on which Lib. 12.75. date he wrote as follows to his brother-in-law: W. L. Garrison to G. W. Benson. Boston, May 13, 1842. Ms. You will see, by the Liberator of to-day, that I did not goacting as General Agent, pro tempore, of the National Society (Ms. July 8, 1842, W. L. G. to G. W. Benson). Abby Kelley did not get along till the next day at noon. She came Nov. 15. from Waterloo, f. Ms. the small-pox in its most malignant form. His family has been Dec. 19, 1842, Anna to G. W. Benson. in much trouble the past year. His brother James, a poor drunken sailor, was upon his handscircumstances made the last a very trying year to him. Announcing his brother's demise to G. W. Benson, Mr. Garrison wrote: As his case had long been hopeless, his release from the Ms. Oct. 1
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 3: the covenant with death.1843. (search)
th Lib. 13.10. was far from restored. He struggled on till June, when a mysterious distress in the left side again caused him Ms. Apr. 15, 1843, W. L. G. to G. W. Benson. grave apprehensions that he had not long to live. His latest residence in Cambridgeport, though very healthfully situated, was associated with an extraordina among the freest and best spirits of the age, Lib. 12.143. when publishing their manifesto. Organization was effected on April 8, Noyes's Am. 1842, and as George W. Benson was one of the founders, Socialisms, p. 155. the progress of the enterprise was constantly reported to his brother-in-law. The subject of social reorganiza regards his opinion with infinite scorn and contempt, having on the other side the opinions of certain homoeopathists June 12, 1843, Mr. Garrison writes to G. W. Benson (Ms.): Last Tuesday [June 6] Dr. Warren made a careful examination of my side in the presence of Dr. [Henry I.] Bowditch. He says it is neither a tumor nor an
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
ompson and Webb and H. C. Wright swelled the cheering led by Frederick Douglass. More than twenty years would elapse before the voyager's eye should again behold the pleasant English shores now vanishing behind him. From Halifax on the eleventh Ms. Nov. 15, 1846. day he pencilled a line to Elizabeth Pease, informing her of the smooth and safe passage, attended, nevertheless, with more than the ordinary discomforts for his overtaxed system. On December 11, 1846, Mr. Garrison wrote to Geo. W. Benson (Ms.): The Garrisonian ranks are filling up. This morning, dear Helen presented me with a new-comer into this breathing world,—a daughter,—and the finest babe ever yet born in Boston! On Dec. 19 he informed S. J. May (Ms.) that the little girl had been named Elizabeth Pease. Wendell Phillips wrote to her namesake on Jan. 31, 1847 (Ms.): Garrison's child is a nice, healthy, dark-eyed little thing, much like his other little one, Helen. I am glad he has called it E. P., for you will fee
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
er of them foreseeing how long a time would elapse before the editor could resume his chair. Nor, happily, could Mrs. Garrison realize that her husband, whose health latterly had been far from good, was taking Ms. June 26, 1847, W. L. G. to G. W. Benson. leave of her at a risk surpassing that of the voyage to England the year before. The progress of his tour, in which he was to have the companionship of Frederick Douglass, can best be show n from his letters to her: W. L. Garrison to hite incapacitated Oct. 28, 1847. up to the end of the year from taking any part in the conduct of the Liberator. Moreover, the finances of the paper, Ms. Dec. 17, 1847. owing to an ill-advised reduction of the subscription price W. L. G. to G. W. Benson; Lib. 17.2, 202. at the opening of the volume, were a weight upon his spirits. On the other hand, the state of the abolition cause gave no occasion for despondency. The war with Mexico had greatly enlarged the freedom of utterance in Congr
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
e, Maria W. Chapman, Charles K. Whipple, Samuel Philbrick, Loring Moody, Edmund Quincy, S. S. and Abby Kelley Foster, G. W. Benson, Andrew Robeson, Parker Pillsbury, James and Lucretia Mott, Edward M. Davis, C. C. Burleigh, H. C. Wright, J. Miller M0: 71, 90, 91; Pierce's Life of Sumner, 2: 294). and Theodore Parker; with supplementary ones by Charles K. Whipple. George W. Benson presided over the two days session in the Melodeon—an ill-lighted hall used on week-days for secular entertainments, for him the water-cure. At Bensonville, near Northampton, Mass., the seat of the lately defunct Community of which George W. Benson had been a leading spirit, Ante, pp. 81, 83. and still his home, a hydropathic establishment had been instituted byople, and urging upon them the importance of sending delegates to the meeting. Bro. George drove down to the depot a G. W. Benson. few minutes after my arrival, and carried me and my baggage, with Mr. Child and Mrs. Hammond Eliza P. Hammond, for
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 13: the Bible Convention.—1853. (search)
ose remains were lying beneath the sod. They are buried on a rising elevation in a large wheat field, which is seen conspicuously at a considerable distance—half a dozen young and thrifty oak trees standing in a row on one side of the enclosure. To me it was hallowed ground, and, while standing there, I renewed my pledge of fidelity to the cause of the enslaved while life continues. Thomas reminds me somewhat of dear brother George. His heart was well-nigh buried in Elizabeth's grave, G. W. Benson. and his reverence for her memory carries an air of solemnity about it, as though she had been an angelic visitant from another sphere. . . . This afternoon I leave for Detroit, where I am to speak to-morrow afternoon and evening. There is a good deal of excitement in that place, caused by the recent meetings held there by S. S. and Abby K. Foster. The Detroit papers are full of pro-slavery slang, especially the Free Soil paper, which Free Democrat. has assailed our friends after th