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The Daily Dispatch: June 3, 1864., [Electronic resource], The Federal Excursion into Florida. (search)
Birney on his march and rendered valuable assistance as guides and cattle drivers. The following details of the raid we are permitted to copy from a private letter written by Hen A G Browne U S Treasury agent, who accompanied Gen Bieney as a volunteer aid and also to look after captured and abandoned rebel property: The expedition started from Jacksonville a little before midnight on Tuesday, April 26th The gunboat Ottawa led the way up the river, by the transport steamer very Benton and Herriet Weed. The Mary Benton carried a considerable force of negro troop and had six large boats in low. At Picolata the Harriet Weed took on board a detachment of the 75th N Y, and some mounted infantry. As we went up we took possession of every boat on the west side of the Johns, including a small stoop which, no doubt, was the boat used by the rebels in laying torpedoes in the river. At Welaka, which is on the east bank of the river, about 90 miles above Jacksonville, we arrived o
ereft Polly of her senses. The terrible cannonade of that awful day was forever after in her ears. To every term of coaxing and endearment she ever after could be brought to answer nothing but "Bom." So it is with the quadrilateral of the Times. The bullet that gained the battle of Austerlitz, in Moravia, killed Pitt in London. The bullet that gained the battle of Solferino made Raymond a madman for life. It served him as Gen Andrew Jackson said the explosion of the Peacemaker served Col Benton. It blew out the few brains he had without destroying his life. "Guns, bombs, bastions, batteries, bayonets, bullets," now form the everlasting staple of his talk. He has never forgotten, and he never will forget, that awful race of Solferino, in which he so far distanced all competitors as to entitle the result of the race to be recorded, as that of Eclipse was, "Raymond first and the rest nowhere." We are told by Raymond that from this time forward "our raids are to bear direct
enough to last him in. Later in the day, steering east by south, we fell in with the schooner Spokens, of Maine, bound to New York, with a cargo of laths. She hoisted the United States flag as we came up, and was ordered to heave to. Lieutenant Benton boarded, and after removing chronometer and charts, cut away the masts and scuttled her. Two hours after — about 5 o'clock P. M.--captured brig Billow, of Salem, Massachusetts, loaded, also, with laths. The captains of these two vess Cape Breton with a cargo of coals. This vessel, it will be remembered, was captured by the "Florida" about six weeks ago, and bonded by Captain Morris to take sixty-three prisoners to New York. This bond did not protect her, however, and Lieutenant Benton was sent on board to remove stores and set her on fire. She was a magnificent vessel, the cabin elegantly fitted up with passenger accommodations, and everything about her clean and in excellent order. When we left her, the flame had reac
co. The crews of the prizes Lamot Du Pont, James Littlefield, and Mercy A. Howes, were sent off, with three boat loads of baggage and personal effects. At 9 o'clock, captured schooner Howard, belonging to Bridgeport, Connecticut, and just from Cape Breton with a cargo of coals. This vessel, it will be remembered, was captured by the "Florida" about six weeks ago, and bonded by Captain Morris to take sixty-three prisoners to New York. This bond did not protect her, however, and Lieutenant Benton was sent on board to remove stores and set her on fire. She was a magnificent vessel, the cabin elegantly fitted up with passenger accommodations, and everything about her clean and in excellent order. When we left her, the flame had reached the masthead. Midday.--Very warm, considering the cold chilly nights and days just past. The sea is as smooth as a river. Captured the fishing schooner Floral Wreath, of Georgetown, Maine, just returned from four months fishing in the Gulf
and Raleigh. Generals Sherman, Schofield and Terry are in hourly communication with each other, and are pressing the enemy closely. The prisoners taken admit that they are unable to successfully resist this combination, and that Raleigh must certainly fall. General Sherman's wagon trains have arrived at Kinston. The movement against Mobile. A New Orleans dispatch of the 18th instant says: The grand military movement against Mobile was commenced yesterday by General Benton's Third division, Thirteenth corps; Colonel Bertram's First brigade, Twenty-second corps; Generals Viech's and Stokes's brigades are also moving in the direction of Bonsecour. General Andrews also moved from Barrancas with two brigades, and took possession of Pensacola, which he now holds. The rebel guard boat Anna Dale, with one gun, was recently captured in Matagorda bay. Several vessels were blown ashore in a recent gale at the mouth of the Rio Grande. The steam lighte
Affairs in Washington. Washington, Dec. 18, 1865. Among the visitors to the White House, Saturday, were Hons. Daniel S. Dickinson, of New York, and James Humphrey, of Brooklyn; Generals Butler and Benton, and Senators Lane, Foot, Cowan, Raimsay, Fowler and Nesmith. The two daughters of the President returned from New York on Friday. These announcements are a part of the court news, which is gradually increasing in particularity and detail as the Government grows in consequence and power. Hon. Thomas Corwin, who was stricken with paralysis a few days since, was reported as in a dying condition yesterday, at the residence of Mr. Wetmore, the Ohio military State agent. [A press telegram, received last night, announces his death.] The Southern people, in the midst of the desolation which exists throughout their beautiful country, are exciting much public sympathy here even amongst their enemies, and some efforts are being made to render them some assistance. Some s
near by at the time, was so badly burned that he is not expected to live. He, with the mule and cart, were thrown a short distance, and the mule was also badly torn and burned. John Crane was severely burned about the head, hands and feet. One of his feet is badly injured by a splinter. Hopes are entertained of his recovery. The deceased, as well as those injured, have all been in the army and discharged, preference being given, in employing men, to those from the army. Colonel Benton was promptly on the ground, and superintended the operations to stay the flames, and the Two Hundred and Fourteenth Pennsylvania regiment, on duty at the post, rendered valuable assistance. Small-Pox. The small-pox is prevailing to a considerable extent among the colored population, and a number of deaths have occurred. Several have been picked up in the streets in an advanced stage of the disease. The Freedmen's Bureau is energetically attending to the matter, and adopting me
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