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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 30 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 24 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 9 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 23 1 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 15 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 10 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 8 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 7 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Benton or search for Benton in all documents.

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ill and metal, and were being badly worsted. Capt. Davis, on the flag-ship Benton, directed every movement of our fleet with the sagacity and style of a veteran in naval warfare. He made no mistakes. Not a boat was moved but with fearful effect upon the enemy. Did the Carondolet put her bows up-stream, it was to let fly her stern guns; did the Cairo turn about, it was that a broadside might give its destruction to the foe. The Mound City, St. Louis, Cincinnati, and the old war-horse Benton were each and all diligent and effective, while the Conestoga (wooden) lay off at a safe distance and made good use of her long-range guns. The cannonading was fearful and its reverberations most grand and terrible. The noise was almost like one continuous report, while the broad river was covered with a dense volume of smoke that for a time completely enveloped both fleets and hid them from view. It was at this time that a report, louder and more distant than that of a gun, attracted t
he use of the Government as a war vessel. Of the eight vessels of the enemy in this action, but one escaped; three lie buried in the depths of the Mississippi, another is a wreck on the Arkansas shore,;and three damaged by our shot, are saved. I feel great satisfaction in being able to present to the State of Ohio this trophy, taken in an action which terminated so disastrously to the rebel cause. I have the honor to be, respectfully, your obedient servant. S. L. Phelps, Lieutenant Commanding Benton, and Acting ”Fleet Captain.“ Cincinnati Commercial account. Footers Flotilla, Mississippi River, off Memphis, Tennessee, Friday, June 6, 1862, 6 P. M. This morning, at forty-five minutes past twelve, all our fleet, (except the Pittsburgh,) under Commodore Davis, U. S.N., together with the ordnance steamers Great Western, and Judge Torrence, and naval supply steamer J. H. Dickey, was under way and steaming down the Mississippi for Memphis, seventy-six miles below. We p
dark. Capt. Cameron behaved with the greatest gallantry, as did his company K, Ninth regiment Illinois cavalry. I must particularly recommend to your notice the conduct of Major Humphrey, Captains Cameron, Cowan, Blakemore and Perkins; Lieuts. Benton, Hillier, Shear, Conn, Butler and Smith, and First Sergeant Clark, of the Ninth Illinois cavalry, and Capt. Williams, Lieuts. Madison and Ballou, and First Sergeant Miller, of Bowen's cavalry battalion. My thanks are due to Surgeon Jas. the conduct of Major Humphrey of the Ninth Illinois cavalry, Capt. Williams, and Lieuts. Madison and Ballou, and First Sergeant Miller, of Bowen's Missouri cavalry battalion; as also of Capts. Burgh, Knight, Cowen, Blakemore and Perkins, and Lieuts. Benton, Hillier, Shear, Conn, Butler and Smith; Battalion-Adjutant Blackburn, and Sergeant-Major George A. Price; and especially of First Sergeant Clark, of company K, Ninth Illinois cavalry. Dr. James A. Brackett, Surgeon of the Ninth, was prom
ld throughout the action, and his services deserve recognition. Later in the afternoon, reenforcements came up, and Gen. Benton pursued the fleeing foe five or six miles towards Des Are, killing several and taking prisoners. All along the route,dead and wounded; curb-stones were wet with blood, and in one case, even the water of the well was crimson with gore. Gen. Benton's force consisted of the Eighth Indiana, Col. Shunk; a section of Manter's battery, First Missouri light artillery, Lienant-Colonel Wood returned to the Clarendon road and went to the Bayou du View to carry out his original intention. General Benton came up with his brigade and took command. In camp it was supposed that the fight took place on another road, and consequently General Benton's orders were to make a rapid reconnoissance down the Des Arc road. Bowen's howitzers were pushed forward down one road after the enemy. A shot was fired on the rebels and three men killed. Four kegs of powder were found
ce the unfortunate occasion of the loss of field-guns. It affords me great satisfaction to state that the Ordnance Department in the main kept the supply constantly up to the demand, and by the cheerful and ready attention to complaints, and the prompt creation of the requisite means enabled me to withdraw inferior material, and substitute such as was found to be more reliable. To Lieutenant-Colonel Ramsay, in command of Washington Arsenal, to Lieutenant Bradford, his assistant, and to Captain Benton, in the office of the Chief of Ordnance, these remarks in particular apply. To their promptness, industry and active general cooperation am I indebted in a great degree for the means which enabled me to organize such an immense artillery force in so short a time. As has been before stated, the whole of the field-artillery of the Division of the Potomac, July twenty-fifth, 1861, was comprised in nine imperfectly equipped batteries of thirty guns, six hundred and fifty men, and four hu
ce the unfortunate occasion of the loss of field-guns. It affords me great satisfaction to state that the Ordnance Department in the main kept the supply constantly up to the demand, and by the cheerful and ready attention to complaints, and the prompt creation of the requisite means enabled me to withdraw inferior material, and substitute such as was found to be more reliable. To Lieutenant-Colonel Ramsay, in command of Washington Arsenal, to Lieutenant Bradford, his assistant, and to Captain Benton, in the office of the Chief of Ordnance, these remarks in particular apply. To their promptness, industry and active general cooperation am I indebted in a great degree for the means which enabled me to organize such an immense artillery force in so short a time. As has been before stated, the whole of the field-artillery of the Division of the Potomac, July twenty-fifth, 1861, was comprised in nine imperfectly equipped batteries of thirty guns, six hundred and fifty men, and four hu
got my men out in fine order, and upon reaching the turn in the main road halted, but the enemy had been so severely handled that they made no attempt to follow. It was now quite dark, when, seeing nothing further could be done, I returned to this camp. As I left the woods the enemy retreated, leaving their dead men lying in the road, and to-day they have sent in a flag of truce to obtain permission to bury them. On my way in, I met an artillery and infantry force going out under Brig.-Gen. Benton, but it was too dark for him to travel, and he halted. My officers and men are entitled to great praise, and fought with the most perfect coolness and determination. I had with me Majors Humphrey and Wallis, (wounded,) Captains Gifford, Chidister, Knight, (wounded;) Cameron, Blake, more, and Booth; Adjutant Stevenson; Battalion Adjutant Blackburn, (wounded,) Lieuts. Harrington, Shear, Ellsworth, Bayley, and Shattuck, all of the Ninth Illinois cavalry. My guide, William McCulloch