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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 42 2 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 16 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 14 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 10 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Thomas H. Benton or search for Thomas H. Benton in all documents.

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tion of the Southern tribes, having mingled much with the whites, and made some progress in the arts of civilized life, have lately attempted to erect an independent government within the limits of the States of Georgia and Alabama. And Colonel Benton, in his Thirty years view, says (vol. i., p. 164), General Jackson refused to sustain those Southern tribes in their attempt to set up an independent government within the State of Alabama and Georgia. Both these gentlemen well knew--ColColonel Benton could not but know — that the Cherokees only claimed or sought the rights which they had possessed and enjoyed from time immemorial, which were solemnly guaranteed to them by treaty after treaty, whereof the subsisting validity and pertinence were clearly affirmed by the tribunal of ultimate resort. Georgia was permitted to violate the faith of solemn treaties and defy the adjudications of our highest court. South Carolina was put down in a similar attempt: for the will of Andrew Ja
State; whereupon Mr. Calhoun raised the question of reception, declaring that the petitions just read contained a gross, false, and malicious slander on eleven States represented on this floor. That Congress had no jurisdiction over the subject, no more in this District than in the State of South Carolina. After a long and spirited debate, mainly by Southern senators, Mr. Calhoun's motion to reject was defeated by a vote to receive the petition — Yeas 35, Nays 10, as follows: Yeas: Messrs. Benton, Brown, Buchanan, Clay, Clayton, Crittenden, Davis, Ewing of Illinois, Ewing of Ohio, Goldsborough, Grundy, Hendricks, Hill, Hubbard, Kent, King of Alabama, King of Georgia, Knight, Linn, McKean, Morris, Naudain, Niles, Prentiss, Robbins, Robinson, Ruggles, Shepley, Southard, Swift, Tallmadge, Tipton, Tomlinson, Wall, Webster, Wright. Nays: Messrs. Black, Calhoun, Cuthbert, Leigh, Moore, Nicholas, Porter, Preston, Walker, White. In the House, February 5, 1836. Mr. Henry L. Pinckn
Houston M. Hunt Webster T. W. Gilmer Jackson J. Q. Adams Van Buren Clay Benton Polk Tyler Calhoun. the name Texas originally designated an ill-defined at had been written in immediate support of the Tyler-Calhoun negotiation. Col. Benton, in his Thirty years view, directly charges that the letter was drawn from Gon recommends to the cordial support of the Democracy of the Union. Col. Thomas H. Benton, in a speech in the Senate, May 6, had set forth the objections to Messics being those of Whigs: Messrs. Allen, Ashley, Atchison, Atherton, Bagby, Benton, Breese, Buchanan, Colquitt, Dickinson, Dix, Fairfield, Hannegan, Haywood, Hendt; while the opposition of Messrs. Niles, of Connecticut, Dix, of New York, and Benton, of Missouri, was deemed invincible; but the Alabamian was tamed by private, buhould defeat the darling project; and the repugnance of Messrs. Niles, Dix, and Benton, was somehow overcome — the Walker amendment serving as a pretext for submissio
for the future organization of the Territories of the United States, in the same sense, and with the same understanding, with which it was generally adopted. This was carried by 33 Yeas — including Messrs. Calhoun, Jefferson Davis, John Bell, Benton, and every member present from the Slave States, with Messrs. Cameron, of Pennsylvania; Douglas, of Illinois; Bright, of Indiana; Dickinson, of New York; and Fitzgerald, of Michigan, from Free States--to 21 Nays, including Messrs. Webster, of MasSo the bill was returned to the Senate with its amendment struck out; and that body thereupon receded--Yeas 29; Nays 25--from its amendment, and allowed the bill to become a law in the shape given it by the House. On this memorable division, Messrs. Benton, Bright, Cameron, Dickinson, Douglas, Fitzgerald, Hannegan, Spruance, of Delaware, and Houston, of Texas, voted to yield to the House, leaving none but Senators from Slave States, and not all of them, insisting on the partition demanded. So
sappointment and displeasure of his constituents did not, that either he had undergone a great transformation, or nearly every one else had. His speech, though it contained little or nothing referring directly to the compromise proposed by Mr. Clay, exerted a powerful influence in favor of its ultimate triumph. Mr. Douglas having reported March 25, 1850. a bill for the admission of California into the Union, as also one to establish territorial governments for Utah and New Mexico, Col. Benton moved April 5th. that the previous orders be postponed, and the California bill taken up. Mr. Clay proposed the laying of this motion on the table, which was carried by 27 Yeas to 24 Nays. The Senate now proceeded, on motion of Mr. Foote, of Mississippi, to constitute a Select Committee of thirteen, to consider the questions raised by Mr. Clay's proposition, and also by resolves submitted a month later by Mr. Bell, of Tennessee; and on the 19th this Committee was elected by ballot and co
uryear, Sion H. Rogers--2. Tennessee.--Robert M. Bugg, William Cullom, Emerson Etheridge, Nathaniel G. Taylor--4. Louisiana.--Theodore G. Hunt--1. Missouri.--Thomas H. Benton--1. Other Southern States.--None. Total--9. members from Slave States opposed it, of whom but two Messrs. Millson, of Virginia, and Benton, of Missouri.Benton, of Missouri. had been regarded as Democrats; and of these Col. Benton was not so regarded thereafter. Of the Whigs who so voted, but two Messrs. Puryear, of North Carolina, and Etheridge, of Tennessee. were returned to the next House. The bill had thus passed the House in form as an original measure of that body, although it was in essCol. Benton was not so regarded thereafter. Of the Whigs who so voted, but two Messrs. Puryear, of North Carolina, and Etheridge, of Tennessee. were returned to the next House. The bill had thus passed the House in form as an original measure of that body, although it was in essence the amended Senate bill. Being sent May 24th. to the Senate as such, an attempt tempt to amend it was voted down, and the bill ordered to be engrossed, by 35 Yeas to 13 Nays. It was immediately passed, and, being approved by President Pierce, became a law of the land. The struggle which ensued for the practical posses
Dred Scott case. Views of President Buchanan Chief Justice Taney Judge Wayne Judge Nelson Judge Grier Judge Daniel Judge Campbell Judge Catron Col. Benton Wm. L. Yancey Daniel Webster Judge McLean Judge Curtis. Dred Scott, a negro, was, previously to 1834, held as a slave in Missouri by Dr. Emerson, a surgeges and immunities of citizens in the several States, gives slaveholders an indefeasible right to carry their slaves into, and hold them in, the territories. Col. Benton In his Historical and Legal Examination of that part of the Decision of the Supreme Court, in the Dred Scott case, which declares the unconstitutionality of th L. Yancey, and unceremoniously rejected by it, 216 to 36, as will have been seen See page 192.--sets forth the same doctrine more concisely and abruptly. Col. Benton, himself a life-long slaveholder and upholder of Slavery, thus forcibly refutes, In his Examination, aforesaid. from a conservative and legal standpoint, the
e with or trouble themselves about the matter. 3. Breckinridge.--The citizen of any State has a right to migrate to any Territory, taking with him anything which is property by the law of his own State, and hold, enjoy, and be protected in, the use of such property in said Territory. And Congress is bound to render such protection wherever necessary, whether with or without the cooperation of the Territorial Legislature. We have seen how thoroughly this last doctrine is refuted by Col. Benton in his strictures on the Dred Scott decision. If it were sound, any blackleg might, with impunity, defy the laws of any Territory for-bidding the sale of lottery tickets or other implements of gambling. Or the Indian trader might say to the United States Agent: Sir, I know you have a law authorizing and directing you to destroy every drop of liquor you find offered or kept for sale on an Indian reservation; but my liquor is property, according to the laws of my State, and you cannot tou
well as that of the nation. Though her slaves were less than a tenth of her total population, and her real interests were bound up in the triumph of Free Labor and the maintenance of the Union, yet her managing politicians, of the Calhoun or extreme pro-slavery school, had contrived for years to wield and enjoy her power and patronage, by keeping a firm and skillful hold on the machinery of the Democratic party. They had thus succeeded, through a long and bitter canvass,in hunting Col. Thomas H. Benton--once the autocrat of the State--out of the Senate, and, ultimately, out of public life. In accordance with their settled policy, the most of them had professed to support Senator Douglas for President in 1860; and, on the strength of their regularity as Democrats, had elected Claiborne F. Jackson as Governor, Thomas C. Reynolds as Lieut. Governor, and a Legislature either thoroughly committed or easily molded to their ultimate schemes. Of this Legislature, the Senate had instruc
egate from Missouri, 74; 75; 89. Scott, Dred, account of his case, 251 to 253; Judge Taney's decision, 253 to 257; Judge Wayne's opinion, 257; Judge Nelson's, Judge Grier's, 257; Judge Daniel's, 257-8; Judge Campbell's, Judge Catron's, 258; Col. Benton's views, 259; Webster's, 260; Judge McLean's opinion, 260; Judge Curtis's, 260 to 263; Buchanan's views, 264; 306 to 309; allusion to, 381. Scott, Lieut.-Col., defeated by Atchison, 587. Scott, Rev. Orange, 126. Scott, T. Parkin, pressketch of, 147-8; early efforts to purchase it, 149); revolution in, 150-1; Webster opposes the Annexation of, 152-8; further efforts to acquire it, 154-8; Whigs in Congress protest against Annexation, 159; Van Buren and Clay oppose it, 161-4; Col. Benton on, 165; influence of the question on the Presidential election, 166-8; Calhoun favors Annexation, 169 to 171; Congressional, 171 to 174; Annexation consummated, 175; admitted into the Union, 185-6; 209; withdraws from the Dem. Convention, 315