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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 98 14 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 86 10 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 32 4 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 17 1 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 8 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 16, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 25, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 25, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for William Berkeley or search for William Berkeley in all documents.

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the King. During the whole preceding struggle of Charles and the Parliament, Virginia was firm in its adherence to the monarch, and enacted a declaration "that they were born under a monarchy, and would never degenerate from the condition of their birth by being subject to any other government." After the beheading of Charles I., Virginia acknowledged the authority of his son, and actually continued the provincial government under a commission sent by him from his retreat at Breda to Sir William Berkeley. The wrath of Parliament was intensely roused by this bold and persistent contumacy; an ordinance was issued declaring the inhabitants of Virginia notorious robbers and traitors, and all intercourse prohibited with them, either by the people of England, the inhabitants of the other American settlements, or with foreign nations. Finally, a fleet was sent over to overpower the rebellious colony. But observe the difference between the great intellects that then ruled England and the G