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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for N. S. Berry or search for N. S. Berry in all documents.

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me an order for detaching three regiments, one from Berry's, the leading brigade, and two from Birney's, the s orders as to the point of onset, I at once deployed Berry's brigade to the left of the Williamsburgh road, andn of the General-in-Chief Gens. Jameson, Birney, and Berry, whose soldierly judgment was alone equalled by theinotice Capt. Smith, Assistant Adjutant-General of Gen. Berry, and predict for him a career of usefulness and gol. Hayman, constituted our extreme left, part of Gen. Berry's brigade. The Thirty-eighth and Fortieth Regimee Generals commanding brigades, (Gen. Jameson and Gen. Berry,) as well as two regiments, the Third Maine, Col.e regiments and Colonels, to bring Gens. Jameson and Berry to the especial attention of yourself and citizens alled the full meed of anticipated distinction. Gen. Berry, charged with the left wing of our line of battleof Kearney's division, consisting of the brigades of Berry, Birney, and Jameson. These good troops, though wea
n it should have done. General Heintzelman arrived on the field at about three P. M., and the two brigades of his corps, Berry's and Jameson's, of Kearney's division, which took part in the battle of the thirty-first, arrived successively; but the ered with fallen trees, I dismounted and mingled with the troops. The first I questioned belonged to Kearney's division, Berry's brigade, Heintzelman's corps; the next to the Fifty-sixth New-York, now under command of its Lieutenant-Colonel; and thast 6 P. M., in company with Gen. Kearney. Finding nearly all the forces here, I took position in the rifle-pit with General Berry's brigade. During the night my troops were supplied with a proper allowance of ammunition, provisions were brought i General Palmer. For these results I was mainly indebted to the cordial cooperation of Generals Wesells, Naglee, Palmer, Berry, and Devens, and Colonels Neill, Innes, Hayden, and Major West, Chief of Artillery. It gives me great pleasure to say
on with Sickles's left, and placed the remainder of the same regiment between the Massachusetts First and Eleventh, where there was some appearance of weakness. Thus strengthened in front, and provided against attack on his flank, he went on. Berry's brigade soon began, however, to push forward on Grover's left, drove the enemy rapidly and easily before it, and advanced until they completed the line from Grover's left. Robinson's brigade (late Jameson's) was subsequently pushed in between Berry's and Grover's, and continued the movement. But the enemy was not at any time in great force beyond Grover's left, so that the fight in that direction was not severe. At half-past 9 our line was brought to a stand-still. It was evident that the enemy was in great force along the whole line. Near that hour the Fifth New-Jersey was sent out as a reserve to Sickles, the Second New-York to reenforce his advance, and a regiment of Sedgwick's division. The Nineteenth Massachusetts was pu
n of affairs. Our reenforcements soon began to arrive. Gen. Berry's brigade was sent into the woods on our left and ordered-pile in rear of the unfinished redoubt. This position Gen. Berry held till dark, when Gen. Jameson's brigade came up, theal regiments across the main road, placing them between General Berry's brigade, part of Jameson's, and the portion of our trwho gave way from the right of the road. These troops, (Gen. Berry's,) however, most gallantly held their position on the rheir horses. I have already mentioned Generals Jameson and Berry, of Gen. Kearny's division, and will refer you to Gen. Keye wing, my left on Leesburgh road. I posted Colonel Poe with Berry's brigade, in first line, General Robinson, First brigade, Capt. Saunders of the sharp-shooters, Lieut. Derby, and Lieut. Berry are killed. Capt. Bartlett and Capt. Jocelyn, Lieut. Soners. Among the rebels killed were Gen. Little and Acting General Berry, beside many field-officers. Gen. Whitfield was mo
To Major-General F. Sigel, Commanding First Corps, Army of Virginia. Report of General Kearny. headquarters First division, Third corps, army of the Potomac, Centreville, Va., Aug. 31, 1862. Col. George D. Ruggles, Chief of Staff to Major-General John Pope: Colonel: I report the part taken by my division in the battle of the two previous days. On the twenty-ninth, on my arrival, I was assigned to the holding of the right wing, my left on Leesburgh road. I posted Colonel Poe with Berry's brigade, in first line, General Robinson, First brigade, on his right, partly in line and partly in support, and kept Birney's most disciplined regiments reserved and ready for emergencies. Toward noon, I was obliged to occupy a quarter of a mile additional on left of said road from Schurz's troops being taken elsewhere. During the first hours of combat, Gen. Birney, on tired regiments in the centre falling back, of his own accord rapidly pushed across to give them a hand to raise them
fourth New-York. They were badly cut up and would not stand. Half their officers were killed or wounded, their colors shot to pieces, the color-sergeant killed, every one of the color-guard wounded. Only thirty-two were afterward got together. The Fifteenth Massachusetts went into action with seventeen officers and nearly six hundred men. Nine officers were killed or wounded, and some of the latter are prisoners. Capt. Simons, Capt. Saunders of the sharp-shooters, Lieut. Derby, and Lieut. Berry are killed. Capt. Bartlett and Capt. Jocelyn, Lieut. Spurr, Lieut. Gale, and Lieut. Bradley are wounded. One hundred and thirty-four men were the only remains that could be collected of this splendid regiment. Gen. Dana was wounded. Gen. Howard, who took command of the division after Gen. Sedgwick was disabled, exerted himself to restore order; but it could not be done there. Gen. Sumner ordered the line to be re-formed. The test was too severe for volunteer, troops under such a f
up at one hundred and forty-eight (148) killed, six hundred and twenty-five (625) wounded, and twenty (20) missing. Among our wounded officers are Col. Eddy, Forty-eighth Indiana, Col. Chambers, Sixteenth Iowa, and Col. Boomer, Twenty-sixth Missouri. The loss of the enemy, according to the most carefully collected accounts, will number over one thousand two hundred (1200) in killed and wounded, while we have taken one thousand prisoners. Among the rebels killed were Gen. Little and Acting General Berry, beside many field-officers. Gen. Whitfield was mortally wounded in the early part of the engagement, but was removed from the field by the enemy. Several of the officers present pronounced the battle one of the most sanguinary and fiercely contested battles of the war, for the number of men engaged, as during the most severe part of the battle not over three thousand men were engaged on our side at any one time, while, from the statements of many of the prisoners taken, three ful
guns in position on the heights of Grand Gulf, we entered Bayou Pierre about three o'clock on the morning of the twenty-fourth, and attempted to reach its point of intersection with the Port Gibson and Grand Gulf Railroad, in order to move from thence on the rear of the town and heights of Grand Gulf. After passing up the bayou some nine miles, and still eight miles from Port Gibson, a raft across the bayou stopped us. We then backed down, for the bayou was too narrow to turn in, to one Colonel Berry's plantation, four miles only by a good wagon-road. Here, at about eleven o'clock in the morning, the troops were landed. The Fourth Wisconsin, Ninth Connecticut and four guns, after marching two miles, taking a branch road by Hamilton's plantation, which led to the rear of the reported rebel camp — some said five hundred, some nine hundred strong, pitched between the Port Gibson Railroad and the road from Grand Gulf to Willow Springs, and which branch road produced the only two roads
and military positions that have been captured by our armies, and to speedily crush the rebellion that still exists in several of the Southern States, thus practically restoring to the civilized world out great and good Government. All believe that the decisive moment is near at hand, and to that end the people of the United States are desirous to aid promptly in furnishing all reinforcements that you may deem needful to sustain our Government. Israel Washburne, Jr., Governor of Maine. N. S. Berry, Governor of New-Hampshire. Frederick Holbrook, Governor of Vermont. Wm. A. Buckingham, Governor of Connecticut. E. D. Morgan, Governor of New-York. Chas. S. Olden, Governor of New-Jersey. A. G. Curtin, Governor of Pennsylvania. A. W. Bradford, Governor of Maryland. F. H. Pierpont, Governor of Virginia. Austin Blair, Governor of Michigan. J. B. Temple, President Military Board of Kentucky. Andrew Johnson, Governor of Tennessee. H. R. Gamble, Governor of Missouri. O. P. Morton,
ld call together, numbering four hundred. and started for the summit. When near our destination we dismounted, and made the attack on foot upon the enemy, who were posted about four hundred yards beyond the top. One company, commanded by Captain Berry, had gone forward, but returned to the top, several men being killed, and Col. Berry having had two horses shot under him. We then moved forward on foot, amid a shower of bullets and shells, which so terrified my raw, undisciplined recruits, Col. Berry having had two horses shot under him. We then moved forward on foot, amid a shower of bullets and shells, which so terrified my raw, undisciplined recruits, that I could not bring more than one hundred of them in sight of the enemy. The great majority, I am sorry to say, mounted their horses and fled, without even getting a look at the foe. It was impossible to rally them, and they continued their flight to some distance north of Richmond, and were only checked by meeting the brigade under Colonel Link, who compelled them to return to Richmond, where they now are. The brave boys who did their duty were sacrificed through these cowards; for I hav
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