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. So I deployed my little force as skirmishers, and we advanced across the clearing as fast as the swampy ground and tall grass would permit, expecting every moment to be fired at from the woods. Nothing was found, however, but the glistening edges of the palmetto leaves, which the boat's captain had mistaken for bayonets, so we loaded our syrup, and steamed back to port, covered with glory and mud. In the sugar-house, a dirty, dilapidated old shed, a poor family had taken shelter when Berwick was first shelled, and had night before last seen their home there burnt to ashes. There was a mother, down with the fever, two very pretty girls between sixteen and twenty, four or five little ones, and a sickly-looking father, with no work and no money. They were, according to their own account, good unionists, and had suffered at the hands of the rebs in consequence, and now were losing their last remaining property by the hands of the Federals. The husband had done some work for the
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 22: the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
nd General Banks, whose force was too light to attempt the capture of Port Hudson at that time, whose garrison was reported to be sixteen thousand effective men, returned to Baton Rouge; not, however, with the intention of abandoning the enterprise. Banks now sent a large portion of his movable troops again into the Louisiana region west of the Mississippi. He concentrated his forces at Brashear City, on the Atchafalaya, when, on the 10th of April, 1863. General Weitzel crossed over to Berwick without opposition, but discovered that the Confederates were in considerable force on his front, under General Richard Taylor, one of the most active of the trans-Mississippi Confederate leaders. General Emory's division crossed on the 12th, and all moved toward Franklin, driving the foe before them until he reached Fort Bisland and his other works near Pattersonville, where he made a stand. On the same day Banks sent General Grover with his division, on transports and four gun-boats,
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 1: the policy of war. (search)
nos, Redings and Balesteros! The means of succeeding in such a war are difficult enough; to display in the first place a mass of forces proportionate to the resistance and to the obstacles which are to be encountered; to calm the popular passions by all the means possible; to use them now and then; to display a great mixture of policy, of mildness and severity, and above all great justice; such are the first elements of success. The examples of Henry IV in the wars of the League, of Marshal Berwick in Catalonia, of Suchet in Aragon and in Valencia, of Hoche in Yendee, are models of different kinds, but which may be employed according to circumstances with the same success. The admirable order and discipline, maintained by the armies of Generals Diebitsch and Paskevitch in the late war, are also models to cite, and contributed not a little to the success of their enterprises. The extraordinary obstacles which a national struggle presents to an army wishing to invade a country,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations of the artillery of the army of Western Louisiana, after the battle of Pleasant Hill. (search)
eerful courage have always imparted additional vigor to our fire. Major Squires reported to me for duty while we were at McNutt's Hill, and was assigned to the command of the reserve battalion of the army, and exhibited in the subsequent operations at Marksville, Mansura, and the bloody combat at Norwood, the high soldierly qualities to be expected from one who had served with such distinction in the army of Northern Virginia. Major Faries, Chief of Artillery of Polignac's division, only took command in the latter days of the campaign, and at Mansura and Norwood displayed the same energy and courage that characterized him as a Captain. I herewith transmit the reports of Major Semmes and Major Faries, of Major Squires, Captains Mosely, McMahon, Benton, Nettles, J. A. A. West, Lieutenant Yoist, Barnes, Lieutenant Berwick, Captains H. C. West and Winchester. I have the honor to be, Major, Yours respectfully, (Signed,) Joseph L. Brent, Colonel and Chief of Artillery, &c.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
son, Miss., July 5-10. Siege of Jackson July 10-17. At Big Black till August. Ordered to New Orleans, La., August 20. At Carrollton, Brashear City and Berwick till October. Western Louisiana Campaign October 3-November 30. Duty in District of LaFourche and Defenses of New Orleans, La., till August, 1864. Operatuly 5-10. Siege of Jackson July 10-17. Duty at Vicksburg till August 20. Ordered to New Orleans, La., August 20. Duty at Carrollton, Brashear City and Berwick till October. Western Louisiana Campaign October 3-November 10. Ordered to New Orleans, La., November 10, thence to Texas November 12. Capture of Mustanguly 5-10. Siege of Jackson July 10-17. Duty at Vicksburg till August 20. Ordered to New Orleans, La., August 20. Duty at Carrollton, Brashear City and Berwick till October. Western Louisiana Campaign October 3-November 9. Moved to New Orleans November 9-12, thence to Mustang Island, Texas, November 16-25. Duty
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
ans, La., August, thence to Brashear City and Berwick; Western Louisiana Teche Campaign October 3-N La. Duty at Carrollton, Brashear City and Berwick till October. Western Louisiana Teche Camp 20. Duty at Carrollton, Brashear City and Berwick till October. Western Louisiana Campaign Ot 5. Duty at Carrollton, Brashear City and Berwick till October. Western Louisiana Campaign O 10. Duty at Carrollton, Brashear City and Berwick till October. Western Louisiana Teche Campugust 10. At Carrollton, Brashear City and Berwick till October. Western Louisiana Teche Camp 13. Duty at Carrollton, Brashear City and Berwick till October. Western Louisiana Teche Camp 13. Duty at Carrollton, Brashear City and Berwick till October. Western Louisiana, Teche Cam 24. Duty at Carrollton, Brashear City and Berwick till October. Expedition to New and Amite 13. Duty at Carrollton, Brashear City and Berwick till October. Western Louisiana Teche Camp
d 22. Advance on Jackson, Miss., July 5-10. Siege of Jackson July 10-17. Ordered to Dept. of the Gulf August 13. Duty at Carrollton, Brashear City and Berwick till October 3. Western Louisiana Campaign October 3-November 17. Expedition to New Iberia October 3-6 and to Vermillion Bayou October 8-30. Moved to Brad 22. Advance on Jackson, Miss., July 5-10. Siege of Jackson July 10-17. Ordered to Dept. of the Gulf August 13. Duty at Carrollton, Brashear City and Berwick till October 3. Western Louisiana Campaign October 3-November 17. Expedition to New Iberia October 3-7 and to Vermillion Bayou October 8-30. Moved to Bra8-July 4. Advance on Jackson July 5-10. Siege of Jackson July 10-17. Ordered to the Dept. of the Gulf August 13. Duty at Carrollton, Brashear City and Berwick till October 3. Western Louisiana Campaign October 3-November 17. Expedition to New Iberia October 3-7, and to Vermillion Bayou October 8-30. Moved to Br
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Kentucky Volunteers. (search)
Near Clinton July 8. Near Jackson July 9. Siege of Jackson July 10-17. Ordered to New Orleans, La., August 13. Duty at Carrollton, Brashear City and Berwick till October. Western Louisiana Campaign October 3-November 20. Duty at Plaquemine till March, 1864. Moved to Baton Rouge, La., March 23, and duty there uly 5-10. Siege of Jackson July 10-17. Camp at Big Black till August 13. Ordered to New Orleans, La., August 13. Duty at Carrollton, Brashear City and Berwick till October. Western Louisiana Campaign October 3-November 30. Grand Coteau November 3. At New Iberia till December 19. Moved to New Orleans Decemberlinton July 8. Siege of Jackson July 10-17. At Big Black till August 13. Ordered to New Orleans, La., August 13. Duty at Carrollton, Brashear City and Berwick till October. Western Louisiana Campaign October 3-November 21. Duty at Plaquemine November 21, 1863, to March 24, 1864; and at Baton Rouge till April. O
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Massachusetts Volunteers. (search)
tion to Alexandria May 2-7. Boyce's Bridge, near Cotile Bayou, May 14. Movement from Alexandria to Port Hudson May 17-30. Near New Iberia May 18. Expedition toward Berwick City May 21-26. Franklin May 25. Siege of Port Hudson May 30-July 9. Clinton June 3-4. Assault on Port Hudson June 14. Surrender of Port Hudson July 9. Moved to Baton Rouge, thence to Donaldsonville and Carrollton July 11-August 1. Moved to Algiers September 17, thence to Brashear City and Berwick. Western Louisiana ( Teche ) Campaign October 3-November 30. Reconnoissance toward Opelousas October 20. Opelousas and Barre Landing October 21. Washington October 24. Carrion Crow Bayou November 3. Bayou Sara November 9. Camp Pratt November 20. At New Iberia till January 8, 1864. Moved to Franklin January 8-11, and duty there till March 13. Red River Campaign March 10-May 22. Advance from Franklin to Alexandria March 14-26. Bayou Rapides March 20. Monet
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
giers April 3, thence to Brashear City April 8. Expedition to Franklin April 11-17. Fort Bisland April 12-13. Franklin April 14. Expedition from Opelousas to Barre Landing April 21. Expedition from Barre Landing to Berwick City May 21-26. Franklin and Centreville May 25. Moved to Port Hudson, La., May 30. Siege of Port Hudson June 3-July 9. Assault on Port Hudson June 14. Surrender of Port Hudson July 9. Duty at Baton Rouge, Donaldsonville, Brashear City and Berwick till October. Western Louisiana (Teche) Campaign October 3-November 30. Vermillionville November 11. Duty at New Iberia till January 7, 1864. Moved to Franklin January 7, thence to Key West, Florida, February, 1864, and garrison duty at Fort Jefferson till August, 1865. Attack on Fort Myers, Florida, February 20, 1865 (Detachment). Mustered out August 28, 1865. Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 14 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 191
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