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The Mississippi rifle is also too heavy, and carries a large ball; though good for its time, it is now superseded by lighter and more accurate weapons. Take a seat, Adjutant, said Robins, as Lieutenant Nixon entered the tent. We have ,been speaking of the different kinds. of weapons, and by general consent it seems breechloaders are preferred; what think you? I am a better judge of pens than rifles, perhaps, but many old wiseheads still seem to prefer the smooth-bore musket-brown Bess, as it is called-and consider it more destructive than any. Yes, said the Major, their reasons are peculiar; I have frequently heard them. They tell you that at short range, with buckshot, you can kill more than with the rifle. But how often do we get within that short range? If we mutually advanced until within a hundred yards, and then blazed away until one or the other were exterminated, I should decide for a smooth-bore musket, and a sufficiency of buckshot. But suppose the enemy o
hem, with what effect could not be seen, owing to their position. Captain Ward behaved with great coolness, standing by the guns and directing the fire. When his gunner received a wound in the thigh, which disabled him, he immediately took his place, and was sighting the gun when he received a Minie musket ball, which killed him almost instantly. The men left on the shore by the boats in their retreat swam out to the Freeborn--one of the men carrying on his back a wounded comrade named Bess, who had four musket balls shot into him. John Williams, coxswain of the third cutter, received a flesh wound in the leg while waving the Stars and Stripes, which he carried in his hand the whole time, behaving most gallantly under the hottest fire. The American ensign, which he never ceased to wave, was pierced with nineteen musket balls. Only three men of the boats were wounded, and the only life lost was that of the Owens to gallant Ward, who, the moment the enemy was discovered, blew th
or thing, Denied the cover of its mother's wing. One piteous flutter and a plaint — no more I Two wondering faces from the cottage door Peer as the victor with his prey sails o'er. There were bitter tears and tenderness Within that cot, for little Bess Could hardly brook one chick the less. The kitten gambolled, the pet linnet sung; All day old Monument's shadow swung-- She mused and sobbed — her heart was wrung. The mother took her to her arms, and said: “Thy chick my child, is gone, is dead, But a kind All-Father rules o'erhead. “Such little chastenings are meant To probe the secrets in our being pent, Like sun and storm in rainbow blent. “Your father, Bess!” 'twas hard to see His parting look for you and me; His country called — such things must be. “But 'twas a pang we felt we owed For all the land on us bestowed; We faltered — but we've borne the load.” Just then the post-train screeched in sight, Glimpsed on its way with throbbing light, With tidings fraught —
rt! Those days are mostly done; And now we must revive the art Of shooting on the run! If Doodle must be meddling, why, There's only this to do: Select the black spot in his eye, And let the daylight through I And if he doesn't like the way That Bess presents the view, He'll may-be change his mind, and stay Where the good Doodles do! Where Lincoln lives;--the man, you know, Who kissed the Testament, To keep the Constitution?--No! To keep the Government! We'll hunt for Lincoln, Bess!--old toy That Bess presents the view, He'll may-be change his mind, and stay Where the good Doodles do! Where Lincoln lives;--the man, you know, Who kissed the Testament, To keep the Constitution?--No! To keep the Government! We'll hunt for Lincoln, Bess!--old tool-- And take him half-and-half; We'll aim to kit him, if a fool, And miss him, if a calf! We'll teach these shot-gun boys the tricks Fe By which a war is won; Especially how seventy-six Took Tories on the run. --Richmond Dispatch, May 23.
ore famous gala occasion. The pomp and panoply of war are here in the parades and the blare of trumpets and the admiring hosts that line the street—not in the actual service in the field. Harte writes of actual warfare as a sad business, which only the preservation of a nation's existence or honor can justify. The summer day grew cool and late. He went for the cows when the work was done; But down the lane, as he opened the gate, He saw them coming one by one,— Brindle, Ebony, Speckle, and Bess, Shaking their horns in the evening wind; Cropping the buttercups out of the grass,— But who was it following close behind? Loosely swung in the idle air The empty sleeve of army blue; And worn and pale, from the crisping hair, Looked out a face that the father knew. For Southern prisons will sometimes yawn, And yield their dead unto life again; And the day that comes with a cloudy dawn In golden glory at last may wane. The great tears sprang to their meeting eyes; For the heart must speak<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Third Battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
oes, pickles of all sorts, sugar, coffee, rice, ginger, syrup, cheese, butter, oranges, lemons, preserves, canned oysters, whiskey, wines, musquito nets, clothing, stationery, tobacco, etc., etc. To needy Confederates, nothing could have been more acceptable. They sat down to a luxurious dinner, which was in preparation at the time of the attack, and relished it, perhaps, more than those for whom it had been intended. Part of the festivities consisted in breaking a bottle of wine over Black Bess--Lieutenant Ritter's iron twelve-pounder — to a shot from which Major Bridges attributed the speedy surrender of the Minnesota. She had long been familiarly known to the battery by this name, but only now received her formal christening. After everything which would be of service had been brought ashore, the steamer was fired. Her value was estimated at $250,000. About 5 P. M., that day, the enemy's gun-boats appeared, and, without notice to the women and children upon them, began to sh
e since then had the lanes been white, And the orchards sweet with apple-bloom; And now, when the cows came back at night, The feeble father drove them home. For news had come to the lonely farm That three were lying where two had lain; And the old man's tremulous, palsied arm Could never lean on a son's again. * The summer day grew cool and late, He went for the cows when the work was done; But down the lane, as he opened the gate, He saw them coming one by one: Brindle, Ebony, Speckle, and Bess, Shaking their horns in the evening wind; Cropping the butter-cups out of the grass- But who was it following close behind? Loosely swung in the idle air The empty sleeve of army blue; And worn and pale, from the crisping hair, Looked out a face that the father knew. For Southern prisons will sometimes yawn, And yield their dead unto life again; And the day that comes with a cloudy dawn In golden glory at last may wane. The great tears sprang to their meeting eyes; For the heart must speak
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
ts origin is reflected in the absurd request for a military funeral retained in the chorus: O beat the drum slowly and play the fife lowly, Play the Dead March as you carry me along; Take me to the graveyard, there lay the sod o'er me, For I'm a young cowboy and I know I've done wrong. Bury Me not on the Lone prairie is an adaptation of Ocean burial, by W. H. Saunders. The little Old Sod Shanty on My claim is an adaptation of Will S. Hays's The little Old log cabin in the Lane. Bonnie Black Bess, Fair Fannie Moore, Rosin the Bow, The wars of Germany are from the Old World. The Old man under the Hill is a Child piece. The railroad corral was composed by J. M. Hanson, and originally published in an Eastern periodical. The ride of Billy Venero is made over from Eben E. Rexford's Ride of Paul Venarez, first published in The youth's companion, and once a popular declaiming piece. Home on the range was a popular parlour song, while From Markentura's flowery Marge reflects the flowery s
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
0 Blix, 93 Blodgett, S., Jr., 432 Bloodgood, Clara, 283 Blount, J. H., 165 B. L. T. See Taylor, Bert Leston Blue Mouse, the, 284 Blumgarten, S., 603-4 Boas, Franz, 617 n. Boat life in Egypt and Nubia, 163 Bob der Sonderling, 582 Bode, 255 n. Boeckh, 460, 461, 465 Boehme, 529 Boise, 596 Bok, E. W., 315 Boker, George H., 38, 40, 41, 48, 268, 269 Bollman, Erick, 432 Bonn (University), 462, 465 Bonner, Robert, 66 Bonner, T. D., 152 Bonnie Black Bess, 514 Bontoc Igorot, the, 166 Book about the Theatre, a, 273 Book of Commandments, the, 522 Book of doctrine and Covenants, 519. 522 Book of martyrs (Foxe), 521 Book of martyrs, the (Mormon), 522 Book of Mormon, the, 517-21, 522 n. Book of the East, the, 44 Boone, Daniel, 66 Booth, Edwin, 269 Booth, John Wilkes, 269 Boots and Saddles, 160 Bopp, 460, 467, 476 Bordley, J. B., 431 Bornemann, 583 Bornstein, H., 587 Bosanquet, 239, 254, 264 n. Boss, the,
o buy an organ for their church, (beside Gravelly brook then). The Universalist minister (Maxham), and the Orthodox (Marvin), were present and spoke encouraging words. And be it noticed, the levee was opened by singing of hymns and prayer. Their minister was Rev. E. S. Best. Hon. J. M. Usher was there (of course he was) and in his remarks, for he was always ready with a speech, he alluded to the Best Methodists. Mr. Usher's wit seems to have been lost on the Journal man, as he alludes to Mr. Bess several times, and reports Mr. Usher as saying, they have a good organ at one end and soon will have another at the other. Mr. Usher probably put the Best organ in the pulpit end. Samuel Blanchard officiated as auctioneer at the close of the levee. Next came an account, one and a quarter columns, of a meeting in relation to the proposed Medford Horse Railroad. This was on January 2, 1857. One of the three routes proposed was down Ship street. J. O. Curtis was Chairman, J. M. Usher, Se
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