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Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Dr. W. T. G. Morton (search)
one. In July, 1868, a torrid wave swept over the Northern States which carried off many frail and delicate persons in the large cities, and Doctor Morton was one of those who suffered from it. He happened to be in New York City at the time, and went to Central Park to escape the feeling of suffocation which oppressed him, but never returned alive. He now lies in Mount Auburn Cemetery, with a modest monument over his grave erected by his Boston friends, with this epitaph composed by Dr. Jacob Bigelow: William T. G. Morton Inventor and revealer of anaesthetic inhalation by whom, pain in surgery was arrested and annulled before whom, in all time, surgery was agony since whom, science has control of pain Doctor Morton was a self-made man, but not a rough diamond,--rather one of Nature's gentlemen. The pleasant urbanity of his manner was so conspicuous that no person of sensibility could approach him without being impressed by it. His was a character such as those who liv
1830, astronomy and physics were the only sciences to which much attention was paid in Cambridge. There were no laboratories even in chemistry. In 1816, Dr. Jacob Bigelow was appointed Rumford professor and lecturer on the application of science to the useful arts. He was perhaps the earliest citizen of Massachusetts to recogten by Dr. Morrill Wyman. There had been a long period of intellectual inactivity in science from the time of Professor John Winthrop (1779) to the advent of Dr. Bigelow (1816). Men were now awakening to the importance of a knowledge of science, and Dr. Bigelow's plans for technological education doubtless contributed greatlyDr. Bigelow's plans for technological education doubtless contributed greatly to this awakening. In 1842, Dr. Asa Gray, the great botanist, came to Cambridge, and his coming marks an epoch in the scientific life of our city. In 1847, Louis Agassiz, Asa Gray, Jeffries Wyman, and Professor Horsford formed the nucleus of a school of science, which has had more influence on education in America than any othe
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 37: the national election of 1852.—the Massachusetts constitutional convention.—final defeat of the coalition.— 1852-1853. (search)
ccess of our friends. With prudence and firmness liberal principles can be permanently secured in Massachusetts. Your energy and counsels are valuable, and I am glad that they will be felt by the convention. The convention was a representative body well worthy of the State. The Boston delegation included, among lawyers, Rufus Choate, Sidney Bartlett, F. B. Crowninshield, George S. Hillard, Thomas Hopkinson, Samuel D. Parker, George Morey, and Judge Peleg Sprague; among physicians, Jacob Bigelow and George Hayward; among clergymen, Samuel K. Lothrop and George W. Blagden; among editors, Nathan Hale, William Schouler, and J. S. Sleeper; and among merchants, William Appleton, Samuel A. Eliot, John C. Gray, J. Thomas Stevenson, and George B. Upton. Cambridge sent two jurists, Simon Greenleaf and Joel Parker, a former and a present professor in the Law School. Salem sent Otis P. Lord, later a judge; and Pittsfield, George N. Briggs. Against this array of Whigs was an equally form
and by the instance of our respected fellow-citizen, Dr. Jacob Bigelow, on which occasion were present with himself Messrs. mmediate parties. The next movement was in 1830, when Dr. Bigelow, having obtained from George W. Brimmer, Esq., the offerheld on the twenty-third of November, by invitation of Messrs. Bigelow and John C. Gray, to discuss the plan of a Cemetery tonow appointed, consisting of Messrs. H. A. S. Dearborn, Jacob Bigelow, Edward Everett, G. Bond, J. C. Gray, Abbott Lawrence, er, H. A. S. Dearborn, Charles Lowell, Samuel Appleton, Jacob Bigelow, Edward Everett, George W. Brimmer, George Bond, A. H. ry Committee : Messrs. Joseph Story, H. A. S. Dearborn, Jacob Bigelow, E. Everett, G. W. Brimmer, George Bond, Charles Wells,forms the chief entrance to the grounds, was designed by Dr. Bigelow. The first choice of lots was offered for sale, by aue authority of the same, That Joseph Story, John Davis, Jacob Bigelow, Isaac Parker, George Bond, and Charles P. Curtis, toge
Appendix II: list of original subscribers. Samuel Appleton, Nathan Appleton, Abel Adams, James T. Austin, Zabdiel B. Adams, Benjamin Adams, Charles Frederic Adams, William Austin, Jesse Bird, Joshua Blake, George W. Brimmer, Silas Bullard, Charles Barnard, Ebenezer Bailey, Joseph P. Bradlee, Joseph Baker, Jonas B. Brown, John Brown, Charles Brown, Plymouth, Ma. Levi Brigham, George Bond, Jacob Bigelow, Charles Brown, Benjamin Bussey, Dennis Brigham, John Bryant, James Boyd, Joseph T. Buckingham, Edwin Buckingham, Zebedee Cook, Jr. George W. Coffin, Charles P. Curtis, Thomas B. Curtis, Alpheus Cary, Josiah Coolidge, Elizabeth Craigie, Elijah Cobb, George G. Channing, Samuel F. Coolidge, Joseph Coolidge, James Davis, Warren Dutton, Richard C. Derby, James A. Dickson, John Davis, Daniel Denny, H. A. S. Dearborn, George Darracott, David Eckley, Alexander H. Everett, Henry H. Fuller, Robert Farley, Benjamin Fiske, Samuel P. P. Fa
Appendix V: Officers of the corporation. Joseph Story, President. George Bond, Treasurer, Office 9 Kilby Street. B. R. Curtis, Secretary, Office 16 Court Street. Trustees. Samuel T. Armstrong, Jacob Bigelow, George Bond, Martin Brimmer, Charles P. Curtis, Benjamin R. Curtis, Benjamin A. Gould, Isaac Parker, James Read, Joseph Story. Committee on lots. George Bond, Jacob Bigelow, Charles P. Curtis. Superintendent, James W. Russell. Terms of subscrJacob Bigelow, Charles P. Curtis. Superintendent, James W. Russell. Terms of subscription. The price of a lot of 300 superficial feet is Eighty Dollars, and in proportion for a larger lot. Selections may be made on the following terms, and the person who first reports his selection to the Secretary, is entitled to a preference, to wit: 1. From any lots numbered 1 to 350 inclusive and unsold, (a choice from these having been offered by auction) at par. 2. From the remaining lots laid out and unsold, on payment of Ten Dollars. 3. From any other part of the Cemet
walk up Central Avenue, and passing a monument which bears the name of Stillman Lothrop, we come to a handsome white marble column on the left, inscribed thus: To Hannah Adams, Historian of the Jews, and Reviewer of the Christian Sects, this is erected by her Female Friends. First tenant of Mount Auburn, she died Dec. 15th, 1831, aged 76. On Beech Avenue will be seen a monument erected by S. F. Coolidge, with the inscription, The gift of God is eternal life. On the same Avenue is Dr. J. Bigelow's,--a round unfinished column of marble, with a festoon of olive leaves hung about it near the top; and farther onward two granite obelisks, with the names of Stone, and Stephens. This brings us to Cedar Avenue, where we find the name of Melzar Dunbar on one stone, and that of Lienow on another,--the latter an unfinished column, like Dr. Bigelow's. Stillman Lothrop. Peacefully shaded by this oak, sleeps Eliza Ann Lothrop, who died Dec. 7th, 1835, in the 19th year of her age.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays, On an old Latin text-book. (search)
in the Arabian Nights. The epoch of vague dreams will come later; up to the age of thirteen he is a Roman or a Greek. I must honestly say that much of the modern outcry against classical studies seems to me to be (as in the case of good Dr. Jacob Bigelow) a frank hostility to literature itself, as the supposed rival of science; or a willingness (as in Professor Atkinson's case) to tolerate modern literature, while discouraging the study of the ancient. Both seem to commit the error of drawgant imbecility of classical learning. We can spare the Louvre and the Vatican, we can spare Paestum and the Pyramids, as easily as we can spare the purely literary culture from the world. And while watching the seeming death-throes of the one nation on earth which still recognizes literature as a branch of art, we need surely to make some effort to preserve the tradition of the beautiful, lest it vanish from the realm of words. Cambridge: Electrotyped and Printed by Welch, Bigelow, & Co.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Life of George Ticknor. (search)
tin, and repeating passages we had committed to memory, ending the evening with a little supper, which was often a hasty-pudding frolic. When I say that Alexander and Edward Everett, Edward T. Channing, Nathan Hale, William Powell Mason, and Jacob Bigelow constituted this symposium, it is plain that it must have been pleasant and brilliant. The first nucleus of it, for two years, was Hale, Bigelow, Channing, and myself. We kept our records in Latin poetry and prose, but we so abused one anotBigelow, Channing, and myself. We kept our records in Latin poetry and prose, but we so abused one another that I afterwards destroyed them. At this period I very much frequented the families of Mr. Stephen Higginson, Mr. S. G. Perkins, Mr. Richard Sullivan, Mr. William Sullivan, Dr. John C. Warren, Senior, and Mr. William Prescott. But my first real sight and knowledge of the world was in the winter of 1814-15, when I made a journey to Virginia,—then a serious undertaking,—and for three months was thrown much on my own resources, in the Atlantic cities, as far south as Richmond. I was pr
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 16: (search)
6; Prescott, W. H., 1808; Webster, D., 1808, but also slightly 1802, 1805, 1807; Haven, N. A., 1808; Daveis, C. S., 1809; Gardiner, R. H., 1812; Story, J., 1815; Allston, W., 1819. Others who survive, Curtis, T. B., from 1795; Thayer, S., 1805; Bigelow, J., 1808; Savage, J., 1809; Mason, W. P., 1809; Cogswell, J. G., 1810. Five of these gentlemen outlived him. In his old age he still had friends whom he had counted as such for sixty years, although he had outlived so many. With regard to two provided you would let them turn to their libraries to get the information you wanted; but no matter on what subject you talked with him, his knowledge was at his fingers' ends, and entirely at your service.—Life of Prescott, Appendix F. Jacob Bigelow, the eminent and acute physician, the shrewd and witty companion, and James Savage, Mentioned ante, p. 2, as a friend of the father, he survived the son, living to the great age of eighty-seven. He was the author of a Genealogical Diction
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