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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for M. H. Bingham or search for M. H. Bingham in all documents.

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ood by directing the fire, was thrown to the ground, and at first supposed to be killed. He soon recovered. While several members of company K, First Maryland, were taking breakfast, after the first repulse of the enemy, five different balls struck the table. W. Henior, of the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth New-York, had his hat shot off; Gordon Williams, of the Thirty-second Ohio, had his right lock of hair shot away. A rebel ball carried away a portion of the gun-stock belonging to M. H. Bingham, of company C, Third Ohio, and glancing, struck W. Koff's gun, of the same company. At four o'clock the regiments retreated down the mountain in good order, and the Maryland Heights were thenceforward lost to us. Who gave the order for their evacuation, I am unable to say. Certain it is, that every soldier was ready to stigmatize its author, whoever he may have been, as a coward or traitor. And yet it may have been best under the circumstances. Had more troops been drawn from Boli
ood by directing the fire, was thrown to the ground, and at first supposed to be killed. He soon recovered. While several members of company K, First Maryland, were taking breakfast, after the first repulse of the enemy, five different balls struck the table. W. Henior, of the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth New-York, had his hat shot off; Gordon Williams, of the Thirty-second Ohio, had his right lock of hair shot away. A rebel ball carried away a portion of the gun-stock belonging to M. H. Bingham, of company C, Third Ohio, and glancing, struck W. Koff's gun, of the same company. At four o'clock the regiments retreated down the mountain in good order, and the Maryland Heights were thenceforward lost to us. Who gave the order for their evacuation, I am unable to say. Certain it is, that every soldier was ready to stigmatize its author, whoever he may have been, as a coward or traitor. And yet it may have been best under the circumstances. Had more troops been drawn from Boli
d his brigade on the very spot where it was most needed — a large body of the enemy's cavalry appearing that moment a mile and a half to the front, was admirably shelled and dispersed in great disorder, by Capt. Stone's First Kentucky, artillery. I then directed Col. Starkweather to place Stone's battery and that of Capt. Bush's Fourth Indiana artillery on a high ridge on the extreme left, and extending diagonally to the front, and to support those batteries with the First Wisconsin, Lieut.-Col. Bingham, placed on that ridge, and by the Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania, Col. Hambright, placed on another ridge running at almost right angles to the one on which the batteries were planted. This formation gave a cross-fire, and proved of infinite value in maintaining that all-important position during the day. These formations were made in great haste, and in a few moments, but without the least confusion or disorder, the men moving into line as if on parade. I then returned to Harris's brig