Your search returned 16 results in 6 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bird, Charles, 1838- (search)
Bird, Charles, 1838- Military officer: born in Delaware, June 17, 1838 entered the volunteer service in 1861: appointed to the regular army in 1866; promoted major in 1895: colonel of volunteers throughout the war with Spain, in 1898, serving in the quartermaster-general's office.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Black Hawk (search)
afterwards captured by the commander of the garrison at Fort Snelling and delivered up to the Chippewas, who immediately shot them. The chief of the Sioux (Red Bird) resolved to be revenged, and he and some companions killed several white people. General Atkinson, in command in the Northwest, finally captured Red Bird and a pBird and a party of Winnebagoes. Red Bird died in prison soon afterwards, when Black Hawk, having been released from confinement, at once began hostilities against the white people on the frontier. General Gaines marched to the village of the Sacs, when they humbly sued for peace. At the same time Black Hawk and a band of followers were muBird died in prison soon afterwards, when Black Hawk, having been released from confinement, at once began hostilities against the white people on the frontier. General Gaines marched to the village of the Sacs, when they humbly sued for peace. At the same time Black Hawk and a band of followers were murdering the Menomonees, who were friendly to the white inhabitants. Black Hawk crossed the Mississippi, and General Atkinson took the field against him; but in July the cholera broke out among the troops, and whole companies were almost destroyed. In one instance only nine survived out of a corps of 208. Atkinson was reinforced
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dodge, Theodore Ayrault, 1842- (search)
Dodge, Theodore Ayrault, 1842- Military officer; born in Springfield, Mass., May 28, 1842; graduated at London University in 1861; enlisted in the National army in 1861; promoted first lieutenant Feb. 13, 1862; brevetted colonel in 1866; retired in 1870. He is the author of Bird's-eye view of the Civil War; Campaign of Chancellorsville; Great Captains, etc.
Erastus E. Cole, standing committee, Edwin Munroe, Jr., treasurer, and Joseph Q. Twombly, collector. At this first meeting Charles Tufts offered the society the lot of land upon which the present building stands, which was accepted. A committee to solicit subscriptions for a church was also appointed, the standing committee, the collector, together with Abel Fitz, Francis Russell, and Ira Thorpe constituting the same. At this meeting George Fogg, John Hunnewell, George W. Ireland, Charles Bird, Jr., and Abram Welch were voted into the society. Charles Williams, Jr.'s, name was added March 1, 1854. The location was a convenient one; besides, it was free. The majority of the parishioners lived within a half-mile. Sunday trains did not run. It probably never occurred to these people that they ever would. Therefore the noise of passing trains on the Sabbath was not considered. A good proportion of the members of the new parish had been connected with other churches in East Ca
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Neighborhood Sketch no. 6.
Medford
and
Walnut streets
. (search)
nt toward the railroad were built. There were three houses only on this portion of Barberry Lane, the one I occupied, the one owned and occupied by John W. Mandell next east of it, and a third one adjoining Mandell, owned and occupied by Charles Bird, Jr. Mandell afterward located on Prescott street as a florist, while Bird drifted to Chelsea and became an auctioneer. Northwest from us, along Medford street, there was no house until you came to Captain Brown's, near Central street. OpBird drifted to Chelsea and became an auctioneer. Northwest from us, along Medford street, there was no house until you came to Captain Brown's, near Central street. Opposite Brown, or a little further along, about where Ames street is, stood a small farmhouse and barn. A little more to the north of Medford street stood the home of Charles E. Gilman on Walnut street, also an old house opposite his, both of which are still standing. Mr. Gilman was about fifty years old at this time, and his farm of several acres extended northerly nearly to Gilman square, and southerly about the same distance, Gilman street being laid out through his land. Gilman was a
, 97 Barberry Lane42 Barrell, Joseph53 Barrett, Samuel, Jr., Schoolmaster, 172065 Bartlett's Address, 181360 Bateman,—62 Bates, Gov. John L., Address by77, 78, 86, 87, 92, 93 Bay State Colony, The14 Bedford, Mass.52 Belknap, Hon. Austin100, 101 Belknap, John100 Belknap, Robert W.101 Belknap, Ruth (Fay)100 Bell, Dr. Luther V.2 Berlin, Germany11 Bernon, Gabriel12 Billerica, Mass.52, 54 Billerica Bridge54 Billerica Mills55 Binney, Captain Martin22, 23 Binney, Sally (Ayers)23 Bird, Charles, Jr.42 Bishop of London38 Blessing of the Bay, The81 Blodgett, Daniel14 Blodgett, Samuel50 Bolbee, France12 Bolton, John, Homestead of45 Bonair Street, Somerville43, 44 Bonner Ave., Somerville46 Bonner, ‘Grandma’47 Bonner, William47 Boston Commercial Bulletin, The6 Boston Courier, The6 Boston Evening Transcript, The16 Boston & Lowell R. R.51, 55 Boston & Maine R. R.51 Boston Latin School20, 32 Boston Traveler, The2 BowLocks and Canal50, 57 Bowdoin College102 Bo