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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for J. G. Birney or search for J. G. Birney in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
rator was languishing for want of support. It ought to be adopted as the centre, the organ of the Society. We do not all feel perfectly pleased with all Mr. Garrison says. Like Martin Luther, his language is rough and sometimes violent. But Mr. Birney has said, My anti-slavery trumpet would never have roused the country—Garrison alone could do it. The Liberator's fault and merit was that it is always a little ahead of public sentiment,—i. e., ultra (Lib. 7.26). Bro. May poured out his soulwas general, and applied to the abolitionists in the main: Their writings have been blemished by a spirit of intolerance, sweeping censure, and rash, injurious judgment. But when he expressly made an honorable exception of the Philanthropist, Birney disclaimed the compliment. Our country was asleep, whilst slavery was preparing to pour its leprous distilment into her ears. So deep was becoming her sleep that nothing but a rude and almost ruffianlike shake could rouse her to a contemplation
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
. 9.51. Stanton was on hand, and with him were Birney and Lewis Tappan, representing the New York Exo harmony with them in the same organization. Birney showed the absurdity of non-voters petitioningr. Garrison found time to prepare an answer to Birney's abortive dictation to quit the ranks. On Man a sad state of mind. Your letter respecting Birney is received. I mean to reply to him next weekgan by rebuking the editor for having admitted Birney's essay without comment, which he called a pra peace man and an abolitionist, he denied all Birney's allegations. He rejected the no-government l action were the imperative duty pretended by Birney, how many were needed to begin to perform it, 88. Mr. Garrison said: I am quoted, by Mr. Birney, as having set the example of Lib. 9.102. vntiments—the two instruments being admitted by Birney to be of equal weight. When he says of this ty connected with it. And so, with a denial of Birney's right, as Secretary of the American Society,[11 more...]