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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 30 0 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 24 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights. You can also browse the collection for James Gillespie Birney or search for James Gillespie Birney in all documents.

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John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights, Chapter 1: Theodore Roosevelt and the Abolitionists (search)
rrison, candidate of the Whigs, was a Virginian by birth and training, and an inveterate pro-slavery man. When Governor of the Territory of Indiana, he presided over a convention that met for the purpose of favoring, notwithstanding the prohibition in the Ordinance of ‘87, the introduction of slavery in that Territory. These were the men between whom the old parties gave the Abolitionists the privilege of pick and choice. Declining to support either of them, they gave their votes to James G. Birney, candidate of the newly formed Liberty party. He was a Southern man by birth and a slave-owner by inheritance, but, becoming convinced that slavery was wrong, he freed his negroes, giving them homes of their own, and so frankly avowed his Anti-Slavery convictions that he was driven from his native State. His supporters did not expect to elect him, but they hoped to begin a movement that would lead up to victory. They were planting seed in what they believed to be receptive soil. A
ous. There will be no cessation of the strife until slavery shall be exterminated or liberty destroyed. The author of the words last above quoted was James Gillespie Birney, who was the first Abolitionist, or Liberty party, candidate for the Presidency, and of whose career a brief sketch is elsewhere given. That the slaveholders reached the same conclusion that Birney and Adams and Lincoln announced, viz., that the country was to be all one thing or all the other thing, is as manifest as any fact in our history. It is equally certain that they had firmly resolved to capture the entire commonwealth for their institution, and had laid their plans towas intended to give them for taking their slave property into free territory, at the time that Garrison was being dragged by a mob through Boston's streets; when Birney's printingpress in Cincinnati was being tumbled into the Ohio River; when Pennsylvania Hall, the Quaker Abolitionists' forty-thousand-dollar construction, was ab
other early Abolitionist, who, in some respects, is entitled to more consideration than any of his co-workers. James Gillespie Birney was a Southerner by birth. He belonged to a family of financial and social prominence. He was a gentleman of edd means when a young man of commanding presence and strength, who happened to be present, announced that while he lived Mr. Birney would not be molested. His opposition broke up the plot. That young man became a leading clergyman and was subsequently for a time Chaplain of the United States Senate. Birney went with his belongings to Ohio, thinking that upon the soil of a free State he would be safe from molestation. He established a newspaper in Cincinnati to advocate emancipation. A mob with his life. More sagacious, although not more zealous, than Lundy and Garrison and a good many of their followers, Birney early saw the necessity of political action in the interest of freedom. He was the real founder of the old Liberty party
rs whom the Lord made for the purpose of serving the white people. Like pretty much all the early Abolitionists, Mr. Chase had a taste of mob violence. He had one singular experience. When the mob destroyed the printing establishment of James G. Birney in Cincinnati, Chase mingled with the crowd. He discovered that personal violence to Mr. Birney was contemplated and that his life was in danger. He made all haste to Birney's residence and gave him warning of his peril. Then he took hison. Garrison and his Liberator violently denounced such action. Moral suasion was urged as the panacea. Chase himself had not been a third party man. In 1840, when there was an Abolition ticket in the field, headed by his personal friend, James G. Birney, he had not supported it. But soon afterwards, becoming firmly convinced that Anti-Slavery people had nothing to hope for from either of the old parties, he set about the work of building a new one. The undertaking was with no mental reser
convention that projected the Liberty party, and of John Kendrick, who executed the first will including a bequest in aid of the Abolition cause. And here must not be omitted the name of John P. Hale, of New Hampshire, who was a candidate for the Presidency on the Liberty party ticket, and also a conspicuous member of the U. S. Senate. Going westward, we come to Ohio, which became, early in the movement, the dominating center of Abolitionist influence. Salmon P. Chase was there. James G. Birney, after being forced out of Kentucky, was there. Ex-United States Senator Thomas Morris, a candidate for the Vice-Presidency on the Liberty party ticket, was there. Leicester King and Samuel Lewis, Abolition candidates for the governorship of the State, were there. Joshua R. Giddings and United States Senator Ben. Wade were there. One great advantage the Ohio Abolitionists enjoyed was that they were harmonious and united. In the East that was not the case. There was a bitter feud
mobs, 008-1 2; in Haverhill, 108; in Nantucket, 09; martyrs, 113-120; sentiment in England, 130. Anti-Slavery societies, organization, 26; in New England, 72, 74, 75, 130, 200; National, 76, 79, 87, 201. Anti-Unionist, 13. B Bacon, Benjamin C., 201. Bailey, Dr. Gamaliel, 100, 207. Ballou, Adin, 205. Barbadoes, James, 202. Bates, Judge, 61. Beecher, Henry Ward, 90, 142, 148; speech in England, 90-93; and Lincoln, 92. Bell, 152. Benson, George W., 203. Benton, Thomas H., 154. Birney, Jas. G., 2, 5, 42, 56-58, 205. Black laws 35;in Ohio, 35. Black Republic of Texas, 135. Blair, Gen. Frank P., 158, 186-191; and Missouri emancipationists, i 6; and Missouri Abolitionists, 188; appearance of, 189; fearlessness, 189; quarrel with Fremont, 189; and capture of Camp Jackson, 189-1911; threats against, 190. Blair, Montgomery, 158, 161. Bonner, Hon. Benjamin R., 155. Border-ruffianism, 153. Border Slave-State message, text of, 213-214. Boyle, James, 205. Bradley, John, 135